Sunday Scripture Readings September 26 2010 26th Sunday in Ordinary Time

September 26 2010 Twenty Sixth Sunday in Ordinary Time
Disclaimer – Official Readings of the Liturgy at – http://www.usccb.org/nab/

Amos 6:1a,4-7
Douay-Rheims Challoner

Woe to you that are wealthy in Sion; You that sleep upon beds of ivory, and are wanton on your couches: that eat the lambs out of the flock, and the calves out of the midst of the herd; You that sing to the sound of the psaltery: they have thought themselves to have instruments of music like David; That drink wine in bowls, and anoint themselves with the best ointments: and they are not concerned for the affliction of Joseph.

Wherefore now they shall go captive at the head of them that go into captivity: and the faction of the luxurious ones shall be taken away.

Responsorial Psalm 145:7, 8-9, 9-10 (Ps 146 NAB)
DR Challoner Text Only

Blessed is he
Who keepeth truth for ever:
who executeth judgment for them that suffer wrong:
who giveth food to the hungry.
The Lord looseth them that are fettered:

The Lord enlighteneth the blind.
The Lord lifteth up them that are cast down:
the Lord loveth the just.

The Lord keepeth the strangers,
he will support the fatherless and the widow:
and the ways of sinners he will destroy.

The Lord shall reign for ever:
thy God, O Sion, unto generation and generation.

1 Timothy 6:11-16
Haydock New Testament

But thou, O man of God, fly these things: and pursue justice, piety, faith, charity, patience, meekness. Fight the good fight of faith, lay hold on eternal life whereunto thou art called, and hast confessed a good confession before many witnesses.

I charge thee before God, who quickeneth all things, and before Christ Jesus, who gave testimony under Pontius Pilate, a good confession: That thou keep the commandment without spot, blameless, unto the coming of our Lord Jesus Christ: Which in his times he shall shew, who is the Blessed and only Mighy, the King of kings, and Lord of lords: Who only hath immortality, and inhabiteth light inaccessible, whom no man hath seen, nor can see: to whom be honour and empire everlasting. Amen.

The Holy Gospel of Jesus Christ According to Saint Luke 16:19-31
Haydock New Testament

There was a certain rich man, who was clothed in purple and fine linen: and feasted sumptuously every day. And there was a certain beggar, by name Lazarus, who lay at his gate, full of sores, Desiring to be filled with the crumbs that fell from the rich man’s table; and no one did give him: moreover, the dogs came and licked his sores.

And it came to pass that the beggar died, and he was carried by the Angels into Abraham’s bosom. And the rich man also died: and he was buried in hell. And lifting up his eyes when he was in torments, he saw Abraham afar off, and Lazarus in his bosom: And he cried, and said:

Father Abraham, have mercy on me, and send Lazarus, that he may dip the tip of his finger in water, to cool my tongue, for I am tormented in this flame.

And Abraham said to him:

Son, remember that thou didst receive good things in thy life-time, and likewise Lazarus evil things: but now he is comforted, and thou art tormented. And besides all this, between us and you there is fixed a great chaos: so that they who would pass from hence to you, cannot, nor from thence come hither.

And he said:

Then, Father, I beseech thee that thou wouldst send him to my father’s house: For I have five brethren, that he may testify to them, lest they also come into this place of torments.

And Abraham said to him:

They have Moses and the prophets; let them hear them.

But he said:

No, father Abraham; but if one went to them from the dead, they will do penance.

And he said to him:

If they hear not Moses and the prophets, neither will they believe if one rise again from the dead.

Haydock Commentary Amos 6:1a,4-7

  • Ver. 1. Wealthy. Sept. Syr. and Arab. “despisers of Sion.” Heb. also, “who hate Sion.” The prophecy wholly regards Israel. C.—It is a great crime for the rich to neglect the poor; but still more so, when wealthy clergymen shew no compassion for the spiritual or corporal wants of their neighbours. W.—State. Heb. “to whom the house of Israel comes” for judgment.
  • Ver. 4. Ivory, with which the beds for eating were adorned. v. 7. C.—Wanton. Heb. “stretch themselves out upon their,” &c. H.
  • Ver. 5. David. They think they excel him in music; but he consecrated his talent to a better purpose. C.—Sept. “they deemed them stable, and not fugitive things.” H.—They have placed their chief good in such pleasures. Theod. C.
  • Ver. 6. In bowls. Sept. “refined,” (H.) or cleared of the dregs.—Joseph, of their brethren, or they seem to have no share in the sufferings of mankind. Ps. lxxii. 5.
  • Ver. 7. Luxurious. Heb. “the feast of those who stretch themselves out, shall,” &c. Sept. “the neighing shall be removed from Ephraim.” His luste shall be punished. Jer. v. 8.—Some translate Heb. “the mourning of those who stretch themselves on their beds is at hand.” Others, “their funeral feast is distant.” None shall bewail their death. So ambiguous is the original. C.

Haydock Commentary 1 Timothy 6:11-16

  • Ver. 11. But thou, O man of God. This, says S. Chrys. is one of the highest titles and commendations that can be given to any man. So are called Samuel, Elias, Eliseus. 1 K. ii. and ix. 3 K. xxxiii. Wi.
  • Ver. 12. Fight the good fight. Lit. strive a good strife. S. Paul oftentimes brings this comparison of men striving for a prize.—And hast confessed a good confession before many witnesses, not only when baptized, not only when thou wast ordained a bishop, but by thy constancy and sufferings, and persecutions, says S. Chrys. though we know not the particulars. Wi.—Timothy had made profession of his faith at his baptism, at his ordination, and during the whole course of a life which, through many labours and persecutions, had been dedicated entirely to promote the faith. D. Thomas.—Like him let us also combat, if we aspire after the same triumph and prize.
  • Ver. 13. Under Pontius Pilate, &c. Some expound it of the words and particular testimony Christ gave when he said he was king, but not of this world, who came to teach the truth. We may rather understand it with others, of all Christ taught and suffered under Pilate, or whilst he was governor of Judea. Wi.
  • Ver. 14. That thou keep the commandment. Some understand that of fighting manfully; others of loving God; others rather comprehend all that S. Paul had commanded him, and all the instructions given.—Unto the coming of our Lord; which coming, he in due time will shew. This is the construction by the Greek. Wi.00This coming will be desirable for Christians who have preserved or recovered their baptismal innocence, and for pastors who have faithfully fulfilled their ministry; but terrible, in the extreme, for all who have lived in the constant neglect and omission of their duties.
  • Ver. 16. Who only hath immortality; i.e. is immortal of himself, and by his own nature.—Light inaccessible;

to human eyes or understandings. Wi.

Haydock Commentary Luke 16:19-31

  • Ver. 19. There was a certain rich man, &c. By this history of the rich man and Lazarus, he declares that those who are placed in affluent circumstances, draw upon themselves a sentence of condemnation, if seeing their neighbor in want, they neglect to succour him. S. Cyril, in Cat. Graec. Partum.—He that hath the substance of this world, and shall see his brother in need, and shut up his bowels against him, how doth the charity of God abide in him? John, 1 Ep. iii. 17. A received tradition of the Jews informs us, that this Lazarus was a beggar, then at Jerusalem, suffering in the most wretched condition of poverty, and infirmity: him our Saviour introduces, to manifest more plainly the truth of what he had been saying. S. Cyril, ut supra.—By this, we are not to understand that all poverty is holy, and the possession of riches criminal; but, as luxury is the disgrace of riches, so holiness of life is the ornament of poverty. S. Ambrose.—A man may be reserved and modest in the midst of riches and honours, as he may e proud and avaricious in the obscurity of a poor and wretched life.—Divers interpreters have looked upon this as a true history; but what is said of the rich man seeing Lazarus, of his tongue, or his finger, cannot be literal: souls having no such parts. Wi.—In this parable, which S. Ambrose takes to be a real fact, we have the name of the poor mendicant; but our Lord suppresses the name of the rich man, to signify that his name is blotted out of the book of life: besides, the rich man tells Abraham, that he has five brothers, who were probably still living; wherefore, to save their honour, our Lord named not their reprobated brother.
  • Ver. 22. Abraham’s bosom. The place of rest, where the souls of the saints resided, till Christ had opened heaven by his death. Ch.—It was an ancient tradition of the Jews, that the souls of the just were conducted by angels into paradise. The bosom of Abraham (the common Father of all the faithful) was the place where the souls of the saints, and departed patriarchs, waited the arrival of their Deliverer. It was thither that Jesus went after his death; as it is said in the Creed, “he descended into hell,” to deliver those who were detained there, and who might at Christs’s ascension enter into heaven. Calmet. See 1 Pet. iii. 19.—“Many shall come from the east and the west, and shall sit down with Abraham.” Matt. viii. 11.
  • Ver. 25. It appears from Philo, (de Execrat. p. 9, 37 b.) that the Jews not only acknowledged the existence of souls, and their state of happiness or misery after this life, but also that the souls of the saints and patriarchs interceded with God for their descendants, and obtained for them the succour they stood in need of. Calmet.
  • Ver. 26. Between us and you is fixed a great chaos, or gulf; i.e. God’s justice has decreed, that the bad should forever be separated from the good. We may here take notice that the Latin and Greek word, (v. 22) translated hell, even in the Prot. translation, cannot signify only the grave. Wi.
  • Ver. 27. If they hear not Moses, &c. We think that if we saw a man raised from the dead, who should tell us what he had seen and suffered in another world, it would make more impression upon us than past miracles, which we hear of, or the promises and threats of the prophets, apostles, and our blessed Saviour, which are contained in the Scripture; but it is a false notion, a vain excuse. The wicked, and unbelievers, would even in that case find pretexts and objections for not believing. S. Chrys. hom. iv.—They would say that the dead man was a phantom; that his resurrection was not real; his assertion nugatory. When Christ raised Lazarus from the dead, the miracle was known, evident and public, yet we find none of the Pharisees converted by it. They were even so mad as to enter into a design to kill Lazarus, to get rid of a witness who deposed against their incredulity. How many other miracles did he not perform in their sight, which they attributed to the prince of darkness, or to magic? Christ raised himself from the dead. This fact was attested by many unexceptionable witnesses. And what do the hardened Jews do? They object, that his disciples, stealing away the body, maliciously persuaded the people that he had risen again. Such is the corruption of the human heart, that when once delivered up to any passion, nothing can movie it. Every day we see or hear of malefactors publicly executed yet their example has no effect on the survivors, nor does it prevent the commissions of fresh crimes. Calmet.—“We have also the more firm prophetical word; whereunto you do well to attend, as to a light that shineth in a dark place, until the day dawn, and the day-star arise in your hearts.” 2 Pet. i. 19.—We may learn many very instructive lessons from this affecting history of Lazarus.—The rich may learn the dreadful consequences to be apprehended from riches, when made subservient to sensuality, luxury, and ambition. The poor may learn to make their poverty and sufferings however grievous the nature, instrumental to their future happiness, by bearing them with patience and resignation and resignation to the will of heaven. The former are taught that to expose a man to eternal misery, nothing more is required than to enjoy all the good things of this world according to their own will; the latter that however they may be despised and rejected of men, they may still have courage, knowing that the short day of this fleeting life, with all its apparent evils will soon be over; and that the day of eternity is fast approaching, when everyone shall receive according as he has done good or evil in his body.
Advertisements

Daily Scripture Readings Wednesday September 15 2010 Memorial of Our Lady of Sorrows

September 15 2010 Wednesday Memorial of Our Lady of Sorrows
Disclaimer – Official Readings of the Liturgy at – http://www.usccb.org/nab/

1 Corinthians 11:17-26, 33
Haydock New Testament

Now this I ordain: not praising you, that you come together not for the better, but for the worse. For first of all I hear, that when you come together in the church, there are divisions among you, and in part I believe it. For there must be also heresies: that they also, who are reproved, may be made manifest among you.

When you come together therefore into one place, it is not now to eat the Lord’s supper. For every one taketh before his own supper to eat. And one indeed is hungry, and another is drunk. What, have you not houses to eat and to drink in? Or despise ye the church of God, and put them to shame that have not? What shall I say to you? Do I praise you? In this I praise you not.

For I have received of the Lord that which also I delivered to you, that the Lord Jesus, the night in which he was betrayed, took bread, And giving thanks, broke, and said: Take ye, and eat: this is my body, which shall be delivered for you: do this for the commemoration of me. In like manner also the chalice, after he had supped, saying: This chalice is the new testament in my blood: this do ye, as often as you shall drink it for the commemoration of me. For as often as you shall eat this bread, and drink the chalice, you shall shew the death of the Lord until he come.

Wherefore, my brethren, when you come together to eat, wait for one another.

Responsorial Psalm 39:7- 10, 17 (Ps 40 NAB)
DR Challoner Text Only

Sacrifice and oblation thou didst not desire;
but thou hast pierced ears for me.
Burnt offering and sin offering
thou didst not require:
Then said I, Behold I come.
In the head of the book it is written of me
That I should do thy will:
O my God, I have desired it,
and thy law in the midst of my heart.
I have declared thy justice in a great church,
lo, I will not restrain my lips:
O Lord, thou knowest it.
Let all that seek thee
rejoice and be glad in thee:
and let such as love thy salvation say always:
The Lord be magnified.

The Holy Gospel of Jesus Christ According to Saint John 19:25-27
Haydock New Testament

Now there stood by the cross of Jesus, his mother, and his mother’s sister, Mary of Cleophas, and Mary Magdalene. When Jesus, therefore, saw his mother, and the disciple standing, whom he loved, he saith to his mother;

Woman, Behold thy son.

After that, he saith to the disciple;

Behold thy mother.

And from that house the disciple took her to his own.

OR
The Holy Gospel of Jesus Christ According to Saint Luke 2:33-35
Haydock New Testament

And his father and mother were wondering at these things which were spoken concerning him. And Simeon blessed them, and said to Mary, his mother:

Behold, this child is set for the ruin, and for the resurrection of many in Israel, and for a sign which shall be contradicted. And thy own soul a sword shall pierce, that out of many hearts thoughts may be revealed.

Haydock Commentary 1 Corinthians 11:17-26, 33
Notes Copied From Haydock Commentary Site

  • Ver. 17. Now this I ordain, &c.  S. Paul found that several abuses had crept in among the Corinthians at their Church meetings, where before the holy mysteries (though S. Chrys. thinks after them) they used to have those charitable suppers, called the Agape. For as our Saviour eat first a common supper with his apostles, before he instituted the holy sacrament, so the Christians in may places brought meats with them, and eat a supper together, in token of that friendship and union, which they had with all their brethren, before they began to celebrate the holy mysteries.  It is this supper, which according to the common interpretation S. Paul here (v. 20.) calls the Lord’s supper,[3] (though S. Aug. and some others by the Lord’s supper, understand the holy sacrament itself of Christ’s body and blood.)  The apostle tells them, he hears there are divisions among them at their meetings, which he says will happen, as there must be also heresies, which God permits, that they who are approved, may be made manifest, that is, that on such occasions, the just may shew their fidelity and constancy in their duty to God.  The apostle tells them, that it is not now to eat the Lord’s supper, that is, there were such abuses among them, that it was not now to imitate the supper, which Christ made with his apostles, or, according to the exposition of S. Aug. this was not becoming persons, who, before the end of their meetings, were to partake of the divine mysteries.  Wi.
  • Ver. 19. There must be also heresies: By reason of the pride and perversity of man’s heart; not by God’s will or appointment; who nevertheless draws good out of this evil, manifesting, by that occasion, who are the good and firm Christians, and making their faith more remarkable.  Ch. Not that God hath directly so appointed, as necessary: this originates in man’s malice, and his sole pride, and great abuse of free-will.  The providence of God draweth good out of evil, but wo to the man, says the Scripture, by whom scandal cometh, such as sects and heresies.  Hence S. Augustin, c. viii. de vera relig. says: “Let us use heretics not so as to approve their errors, but to make us more wary and vigilant, and more strenuous in defending Catholic doctrine against their deceits.”
  • Ver. 20. The Lord’s supper. So the apostle here calls the charity feasts observed by the primitive Christians; and reprehends the abuses of the Corinthians on these occasions: which were the more criminal, because these feasts were accompanied with the celebrating the eucharistic sacrifice and sacrament.  Ch.
  • Ver. 21. Every one taketh before his own supper to eat. The sense seems to be, that he took and brought with him, what he designed to eat with others, and give at that supper: but as soon as some were met (without staying for others, as he orders them, v. 33. when he again speaks of these suppers) the rich placing themselves together, began this supper, and did not take with them their poor brethren, who had brought nothing, or had nothing to bring; by this means, one indeed is hungry, and another is drunk, that is, had at least drunk plentifully, while the poor had nothing but shame, and confusion. By this means of eating and drinking without temperance and moderation, they were by no means disposed to receive afterwards the holy Eucharist.  He tells such persons that committed these disorders, that if they be so hungry that they cannot fast, they should eat (v. 34.) before they come from home.  We find these Agape forbidden to be made in the Churches, in the 28th canon of the council of Laodicea, a little before the general council of Nice.  In S. Chrys.’s time, and from the first ages, every one received the sacrament of the holy eucharist fasting, as it is probable this was one of the things which S. Paul gave orders about, (v. 34.) when he came to Corinth.  We must not imagine, that because Christ instituted the holy sacrament, and gave it to his apostles after he had supped with them, that the apostles, or the pastors of the Church, their successors, could not order it to be received fasting, and kneeling, for greater reverence and devotion.  See S. Aug. on this same subject, in his letter to Januarius, liv. tom. 2. part 2. p. 126. Nov. edit.  He says, that though it is evident that apostles did not receive the body and blood of Christ fasting, yet we must not on that account calumniate, or blame the universal Church, in which it is received only by those who are fasting.  He says, it is most insolent madness to dispute against what is a custom in the universal Church.  Wi.
  • Ver. 23. I have received from the Lord. That is, by revelation from Christ, as well as from others, who were present with him, that which also I delivered to you by word of mouth, &c.  Here he speaks of the holy sacrament itself, of the words of consecration, as the evangelists had done, and of the real presence of Christ’s body and blood. Which shall be delivered for you. In the common Greek copies, which is broken for you, to wit, on the cross. You shall shew the death of the Lord. As often as you receive, it shall be with a devout and grateful remembrance of his sufferings and death for your sake.  He puts every one in mind, that whosoever shall eat this bread, (v. 27.) so called from the outward appearances, or drink the chalice of the Lord unworthily, shall, by such a sacrilege, be guilty of the body and of the blood of the Lord. And (v. 29.) that he eateth, and drinketh judgment, or condemnation to himself, not discerning the difference betwixt celestial food and other meats, and not considering it to be truly the body of the Lord. See S. Chrys. hom. xxvii.  If the words of our Saviour, this is my body, &c. were to be understood in a metaphorical and figurative sense only, is it probable that S. Paul, writing twenty-four years afterwards, to the new converted Gentiles at Corinth, would have used words, which full as clearly express a true and real presence of Christ’s body in the eucharist, without one word to signify that this was to be understood in a figurative sense only? Wi.
  • Ver. 24. Juvenius, a native of Spain, and a priest, who flourished under Constantine the Great, about the year 329, has left us the life of Christ in hexameter verse, where speaking of the institution of the eucharist, he says, “Christ taught his disciples, that he delivered to them his own body;” and when he gave them the chalice, “he taught them that he had distributed to them his blood: and said, this blood remits the sins of the people: drink this, it is mine.”  Bibl. Max. P. P. T. iv. p. 74.
    • Discipulos docuit proprium se tradere corpus,
    • Edocuitque suum se divisisse cruorem.
    • Atque ait: Hic sanguis populi delicta remittit:
    • Hunc potate meum.

Haydock Commentary John 19: 25-27

  • Ver. 25. There stood by the cross . . . his mother. And so near to him, that from the cross he both spoke to her, and also to S. John.  Wi.
  • Ver. 26. Though there were other holy women standing by the cross, he takes notice of none but his mother, teaching us, by this, what we owe to our parents.  For although it is our duty to disown them, when they place obstacles in our way to salvation; yet when they do not thus impede us, we owe every thing to them, and must prefer them to all.  S. Chrys. hom. lxxxiv. in Joan. We learn also here, what should be our respect and confidence in this Virgin Mother, so highly honoured by her divine Son.
  • Ver. 27. The disciple took her to his own[1] home, or into his own are, not for his mother, by the Greek expression.  See S. Chrys. and S. Aug.  Wi.

Haydock Commentary Luke 2:33-35

  • Ver. 33. In the Greek, Joseph and the mother of Jesus. V.
  • Ver. 34. Is set for the ruin. Christ came for the redemption and salvation of all men: but Simeon prophesies what would happen in consequence of the wilful blindness and obstinacy of many. Wi. Not that God sent his Son for the fall of any man; but that many, by their own perverseness, in wilfully refusing to receive and obey him, would take occasion of falling.  Ch. And for a sign which shall be contradicted, to signify that Christ, and his doctrine, should be as it were a mark, or butt, against whom the Jews should discharge the arrows and darts of their malice.  Wi. Hence S. Paul, (2 Cor. ii. 16.) We are to one the odour of death unto death, but to the other the odour of life unto life.
  • Ver. 35. And thy own soul a sword shall pierce. These words, which figuratively express the grief of the blessed Virgin mother, when present at the death of her Son, are to be taken by way of a parenthesis. That out of many hearts thoughts may be revealed, and these are to be joined with what went before; to wit, that child shall be a sign of contradiction, set unto the fall and resurrection of many, that the thoughts of many hearts may be revealed and disclosed; when some shall believe, and others remain in their obstinacy.  Wi. Bede, and many others, understand this of the sharp sorrow, which wounded the soul of the blessed Virgin Mary, at the time of Christ’s passion.  Barradius. Carthusianus and Jansenius explain this passage as follows: Behold, this child is placed for a sign that shall be contradicted, which as a sword of most poignant grief will pierce thy soul, O Virgin!  But Christ shall be contradicted, that the thoughts of the Jews may be revealed from many hearts, and it may appear who among them are good, and who are wicked and hypocrites.  Barradius.

Daily Scripture Readings Tuesday Sept 14

September 14 2010 Tuesday Feast of the Exaltation of the Holy Cross
Disclaimer – Official Readings of the Liturgy at – http://www.usccb.org/nab/

Numbers 21:4b-9
DR Challoner

And the people began to be weary of their journey and labour: And speaking against God and Moses, they said:

Why didst thou bring us out of Egypt, to die in the wilderness? There is no bread, nor have we any waters: our soul now loatheth this very light food.

Wherefore the Lord sent among the people fiery serpents, which bit them and killed many of them. Upon which they came to Moses, and said;

We have sinned, because we have spoken against the Lord and thee: pray that he may take away these serpents from us.

And Moses prayed for the people. And the Lord said to him:

Make a brazen serpent, and set it up for a sign: whosoever being struck shall look on it, shall live.

Moses therefore made a brazen serpent, and set it up for a sign: which when they that were bitten looked upon, they were healed.

Responsorial Psalm 77:1bc-2, 34-38 (Ps 78 NAB)
DR Challoner Text Only

Attend, O my people, to my law:
incline your ears to the words of my mouth.
I will open my mouth in parables:
I will utter propositions from the beginning.
When he slew them, then they sought him:
and they returned, and came to him early in the morning.
And they remembered that God was their helper:
and the most high God their redeemer.
And they loved him with their mouth:
and with their tongue they lied unto him:
But their heart was not right with him:
nor were they counted faithful in his covenant.
But he is merciful, and will forgive their sins:
and will not destroy them.
And many a time did he turn away his anger:
and did not kindle all his wrath.

Philippians 2:6-11
Haydock New Testament

Who being in the form of God, thought it not robbery*, to be himself equal to God: But debased himself, taking the form of a servant, being made to the likeness of men, and in shape found as a man. He humbled himself, becoming obedient unto death, even the death of the cross. Wherefore God also hath exalted him, and hath given him a name which is above every name: That in the name of Jesus, every knee should bow of those that are in heaven, on earth, and under the earth; And that every tongue should confess that the Lord Jesus Christ is in the glory of God the Father. *note from Bob: this word robbery is translated differently as grasped in newer Bibles. I have personally checked this and the newer version is correct, but both translations can technically be made. Both give you great thoughts to meditate on.

The Holy Gospel of Jesus Christ According to Saint John 3:13-17
Haydock New Testament

Jesus explained to Nicodemus:

And no man hath ascended into heaven, but he that descended from heaven, the Son of man, who is in heaven. And as Moses lifted up the serpent in the desert, so much the Son of man be lifted up: That whosoever believeth in him, may not perish, but may have life everlasting.

For God so loved the world, as to give his only begotten Son: that whosoever believeth in him, may not perish, but may have life everlasting. For God sent not his Son into the world, to judge the world, but that the world may be saved by him.

Haydock Commentary Numbers 21:4b-9
Notes Copied From Haydock Commentary Site

  • Ver. 4. Edom, one of the princes, had refused them a passage; upon which they went by Salmona to Phunon, (C. xxxiii. 37. 42,) where they probably murmured, (C. v.) and were bitten by the serpents, as we read in this chapter.  C.
  • Ver. 5. God. They had before often directed their complaints against the two brothers.  Now, Aaron being no more, they attack God himself, who had always resented the injury done to his ministers. — Food. So they call the heavenly manna: thus worldlings loathe the things of heaven, for which they have no relish. Ch. — Sept. “our soul is indignant at this most empty bread,” which has no solidity in it, nor support.  Many translate the Heb. “most vile bread.”  Thus, in the blessed eucharist, the substance of bread is removed, and the accidents only appear; so that to the worldly receiver, it seems very empty and light, though in reality it be supersubstantial; containing Christ himself, who fills the worthy communicant with grace and comfort, and enables him to go forward on the road to heaven, without fainting.  H.
  • Ver. 6. Fiery serpents. They are so called, because they that were bitten by them were burnt with a violent heat.  Ch. — Hence they are called seraphim, by which name an order of angels are known.  The Egyptians adored a serpent which they called serapis, at Rome; and they represented their god serapis, with a serpent entwining a monstrous figure, composed of a lion, a dog, and a wolf.  Macrob. Saturn i. 20.  The seraph was a winged serpent.  Isai. xiv. 29. and xxx. 6.  Such often infested Egypt, in spring, coming from Arabia, unless they were intercepted by the ibis.  Their wings resembled those of bats.  Herod. ii. 76. Mela, &c.  God probably sent some of this description into the camp of the Israelites.  C. — Some call them prœster, (Plin. xxiv. 13,) from their burning; others the hydra, or, when out of water, the chershydra, the venom of which is most dangerous.  The Sept. style them simply, “the destroying, or deadly serpents.”  See Bochart. T. ii. B. iii. 13.  Deut. viii. 15.  Wisd. xvi. 5. 10.  H.
  • Ver. 8. Brazen. Heb. “fiery.”  But, in the following verse, it is said to have been “of brass.”  We might translate, “make a seraph, and fix it upon a standard,” (C.) in which form it would resemble one suspended on a cross.  It was placed at the entrance of the tabernacle.  S. Just. apol.  Ezechias afterwards destroyed it, because it was treated with superstitious honours.  4 K. xviii. 4.  Thus the best things are often abused.  H. — God commands this image to be erected, while he forbids all images of idols.  W. — By comparing the different passages of Scripture we may discern the true import of them.  Pictures may often prove very useful and instructive.  They serve the ignorant instead of books.  But then the ignorant must be carefully instructed not to treat them with improper respect, as S. Gregory admonishes.  And is not the same caution requisite for those who read even the word of God, lest they wrest it to their own destruction, as both the unlearned and the unstable frequently do.  2 Pet. iii. 16.  If every thing must be rejected which is liable to abuse, what part of the creation will be spared?  The Bible, the sacraments, all creatures must be laid aside.  For we read, (Rom. viii. 20. 22,) the creature was made subject to vanity — every creature groaneth. H. — It is probable that Moses represented on the standard such a serpent, as had been the instrument of death.  This was not intended for a charm or talisman, as Marsham would impiously pretend.  Chron. x. p. 148.  Such inventions proceed from the devil; and the Marsi were famous for curing the bites of serpents, by giving certain plates of brass.  Arnob. ii.  See Psal. lviii. 5.  But this image was set up by God’s express command; and the Book of Wisdom (xvi. 5. 7,) assures us, that the effect was entirely to be attributed to him, the figure of a brazen serpent being rather calculated to increase than to remove the danger.  Kimchi.  Muis.  Hence Jonathan well observes, that only those were healed who raised their hearts to God.  C.
  • Ver. 9. A brazen serpent. This was a figure of Christ crucified, and of the efficacy of a lively faith in him, against the bites of the hellish serpent.  John iii. 14.  (Ch.)  S. Amb.  Apol. i. 3.  As the old serpent infected the whole human race, Jesus Christ gives life to those that look at him with entire confidence.  Theod. q. 38.  The brazen serpent was destitute of poison, though it resembled a most noxious animal; so Jesus Christ assumed our nature, yet without sin.  C.

Haydock Commentary Philippians 2:6-11

  • Ver. 6. Who being in the form[1] of God, (that is truly, properly, and essentially God from eternity, as the ancient Fathers here observed against the Arians) taking the form of a servant, (i.e. taking upon him our human nature) became truly a man, and as man the servant of God, but remaining always God as before, thought it not robbery, no injury to his eternal Father, to be equal, to be esteemed, and to declare himself equal to God, to be one thing with him: as on divers occasions he taught the people, as we have observed in the notes on S. John’s gospel, &c.  Wi.
  • Ver. 7. But debased himself: divested himself of all the marks of greatness, for the love of mankind.  The Greek text signifies, he made himself void;[2] on which account Dr. Wells, instead of made himself of no reputation, as in the Prot. translation, has changed it into emptied himself; not but that the true Son of God must always remain truly God, as well as by his incarnation truly man, but that in him as man appeared no marks of his divine power and greatness. Made to the likeness[3] of men, not only as to an exterior likeness and appearance, but at the same time truly man by uniting his divine person to the nature of man. In shape[4] (or habit) found as a man: not clothed exteriorly only, as a man is clothed with a garment or coat, but found both as to shape and nature a man; and, as S. Chrys. says, with the appearance of a sinful man, if we consider him persecuted by the Jews, and nailed to an infamous cross.  Wi.
  • Ver. 9. God . . . hath given him a name, &c.  The name or word Jesus represents the dignity of him who is signified by the name, and who is exalted even as man, above all creatures in heaven, earth, and hell; all which creatures either piously reverence him, or are made subject to him against their will, that every tongue may confess our Lord Jesus to be now, and to have been always, in the glory of his Father, equal to him in substance and in all perfections.  Wi.
  • Ver. 10. If we shew respect when the name of our sovereign is mentioned, may we not express our respect also at the name of Jesus; and if to his name, why not to his cross as well as to the throne of the king?

Haydock Commentary John 3:13-17

  • Ver. 14-15. We know that we have passed from death to life; i.e. from the death of sin to the life of grace: we know it by a moral certainty, when we experience in our heart a love of our neighbour. He that loveth not God and his neighbour, abideth in death. He that hateth his brother with a mortal hatred, or to a considerable degree, is a murderer. Wi.
  • Ver. 16. The charity of God,[2] because he hath laid down his life for us. Jesus Christ, therefore, who laid down his life for us, was God.  It is true at present the words of God are wanting in most Greek MSS.: yet the Prot. translation has them.  Wi.

Sunday Scripture Readings September 12 2010 24th Sunday in Ordinary Time

September 12 2010 Twenty Fourth Sunday in Ordinary Time
Disclaimer – Official Readings of the Liturgy at – http://www.usccb.org/nab/

Exodus 32:7-14
Douay-Rheims Challoner

And the Lord spoke to Moses, saying:

Go, get thee down: thy people, which thou hast brought out of the land of Egypt, hath sinned. They have quickly strayed from the way which thou didst shew them: and they have made to themselves a molten calf, and have adored it, and sacrificing victims to it, have said: These are thy gods, O Israel, that have brought thee out of the land of Egypt.

And again the Lord said to Moses:

I see that this people is stiffnecked: Let me alone, that my wrath may be kindled against them, and that I may destroy them, and I will make of thee a great nation.

But Moses besought the Lord his God, saying:

Why, O Lord, is thy indignation enkindled against thy people, whom thou hast brought out of the land of Egypt, with great power, and with a mighty hand? Let not the Egyptians say, I beseech thee: He craftily brought them out, that he might kill them in the mountains, and destroy them from the earth: let thy anger cease, and be appeased upon the wickedness of thy people. Remember Abraham, Isaac, and Israel, thy servants, to whom thou sworest by thy own self, saying: I will multiply your seed as the stars of heaven: and this whole land that I have spoken of, I will give to your seed, and you shall possess it for ever:

And the Lord was appeased from doing the evil which he had spoken against his people.

1 Timothy 1:12-17
Haydock NT

I give thanks to him who hath strengthened me, Christ Jesus our Lord, that he deemed me faithful, putting me in the ministry: Who before was a blasphemer, and a persecutor, and contumelious: but I obtained the mercy of God, because I did it ignorantly in unbelief.

Now the grace of our Lord hath abounded exceedingly with faith and love, which is in Christ Jesus. A faithful saying, and worthy of all acceptation: that Christ Jesus came into this world to save sinners, of whom I am the chief. But for this cause have I obtained mercy: that in me first Christ Jesus might shew forth all patience, for the information of those who shall believe in him unto life everlasting. Now to the king of ages, immortal, invisible, the only God, be honour and glory for ever and ever. Amen.

The Holy Gospel of Jesus Christ According to Saint Luke 15:1-32
Haydock New Testament

NOW the publicans and sinners drew near unto him, to hear him. And the Pharisees and the Scribes murmured, saying:

This man receiveth sinners, and eateth with them.

And he spoke to them this parable, saying:

What man among you that hath a hundred sheep, and if he shall lose one of them, doth he not leave the ninety-nine in the desert, and go after that which is lost until he find it? And when he hath found it, doth he not lay it upon his shoulders rejoicing: And coming home call together his friends and neighbors, saying to them: Rejoice with me, because I have found my sheep that was lost?

I say to you, that even so there shall be joy in heaven upon one sinner that doth penance, more than upon ninety-nine just who need not penance. Or what woman, having ten groats, if she lose one groat, doth not light a candle and sweep the house, and seek diligently, till she find it? And when she hath found it, call together her friends and neighbours, saying:

Rejoice with me, because I have found the groat which I had lost.

So I say to you, there shall be joy before the Angels of God upon one sinner doing penance.

And he said:

A certain man had two sons: And the younger of them said to his father:

Father, give me the portion of substance that falleth to me.

And he divided until them his substance. And not many days after, the younger son gathering all together, went abroad into a far country: and there wasted his substance by living riotously. And after he had spent all, there came a might famine in that country, and he began to be in want. And he went, and joined himself to one of the citizens of that country. And he sent him into his farm to feed swine. And he would fain have filled his belly with the husks the swine did eat: and no man gave unto him. And returning to himself, he said:

How many hired servants in my father’s house have plenty of bread, and I here perish with hunger? I will arise, and will go to my father, and say to him: ‘Father, I have sinned against heaven, and before thee: I am not now worthy to be called thy son: make me as one of thy hired servants.’

And rising up, he went to his father. And when he was yet a great way off, his father saw him, and was moved with compassion, and running to him, fell upon his neck and kissed him. And the son said to him:

Father, I have sinned against heaven and before thee: I am not now worthy to be called thy son.

But the father said to his servants:

Bring forth, quickly, the first robe, and put it on him, and put a ring on his hand, and shoes on his feet: And bring hither the fatted calf, and kill it, and let us eat and make merry: Because this, my son, was dead, and is come to life again: he was lost and is found.

And they began to be merry. Now his elder son was in the field: and when he came and drew nigh to the house, he heard music and dancing: And he called one of the servants, and asked what these things meant. And he said to him:

Thy brother is come, and thy father hath killed the fatted calf, because he hath received him safe.

And he was angry, and would not go in. His father, therefore, coming out, began to entreat him. And he answering, said to his father:

Behold, for so many years do I serve thee, and I have never transgressed thy commandment, and yet thou hast never given me a kid to make merry with my friends: But as soon as this, thy son, is come, who hath devoured his substance with harlots, thou hast killed for him the fatted calf.

But he said to him:

Son, thou art always with me, and all I have is thine. But it was fit that we should make merry and be glad, for this, thy brother, was dead, and is come to life again: he was lost, and is found.

Haydock Commentary Exodus 32:7-14

  • Ver. 7. Thy people. They are not worthy to be styled my people; and thou didst ratify the covenant with me, in their name, and as their interpreter. They have sinned, giving way to idolatry in thought, word, and deed.
  • Ver. 9. And again. The Sept. omit this verse. Moses, at the first intimation of the people’s sin, fell prostrate before the Lord, to sue for pardon, and pleaded the natural weakness of an ungovernable multitude, in order to extenuate their fault. This God admits.—I see, &c. But while he seems bent on punishing them, to try his servant, he encourages him inwardly to pray with fervour. Salien.
  • Ver. 10. Alone One fully determined on revenge will bear with no expostulation; whence S. Greg. (Mor. ix. 11,) and Theodoret (q. 67,) look upon this as an incitement to pray more earnestly, seeing God’s servants have such influence over Him. The mercy of God struggled with his justice, and stopped its effects.—Nation, as I promised to Abraham; or I will make thee ruler over a nation greater than this, as Moses explains it, (Deut. ix. 14,) and as the like offer is made, Num. xiv. 12. The Sam. Subjoins here, “And God was likewise much irritated against Aaron, and would have destroyed him; but Moses prayed for him:” which we are assured was the case. Deut. ix. 20. C.
  • Ver. 11. Why, &c. Calvin here accuses Moses of arrogance, in prescribing laws to God’s justice. But S. Jerome (ep. ad Gaud.) commends his charity and “prayer, which hindered God’s power.” W.
  • Ver. 12. Craftily. Heb. “with a malicious design.” Moses insinuates, that the glory of God is interested not to punish the Hebrews, lest the Gentiles should *plaspheme, particularly as the land of Chanaan seemed to be promised unconditionally to the posterity of Abraham, who were now, all but one, to be exterminated. H.
  • Ver. 13. Thy servants. Thus God honours his friends, and rewards their merits, which are the effects of his grace. W.
  • Ver. 14. Appeased. Yet of this Moses was not fully assured, and in effect only those who had been less guilty, were reprieved to be punished afterwards. V. 30. 35. H.

Haydock Commentary 1 Timothy 1:12-17

  • Ver. 13. Because I did it ignorantly in unbelief, or in incredulity. Not that we can think it an invincible and altogether an inculpable ignorance, such as would have made S. Paul blameless in the sight of God. It was through his pure mercy that he called S. Paul, when his great sins and false zeal made him a greater object of the divine mercy: and God in him was pleased to make known to all men his wonderful patience, that no sinners might despair. The grace of God was superabounding, or exceedingly abundant in him. Wi.
  • Ver. 15. Christ Jesus, the true Son of God, came into this world to save sinners, of whom (says S. Paul) I am the chief, the first, the greatest. Wi.

Haydock Commentary Luke Chapter 15

  • Ver. 4. What man, &c. Christ left the ninety-nine in the desert, when he descended from the angelic choirs, in order to seek last man on the earth, that he might fill up the number of the sheepfold of heaven, from which his sins had excluded him. S. Amb.—Neither did his affection for the last sheep make him behave cruelly to the rest; for he left them in safety, under the protection of his omnipotent hand. S. Cyril ex D. Thoma Aquin.
  • Ver. 7. Joy in heaven, &c. What incitement ought it not to be to use to practise virtue, when we reflect that our conversion causes joy to the troops of blessed spirits, whose protection we should always seek, and whose presence we should always revere. S. Amb.—There is greater joy for the conversion of a sinner, than for the perseverance of the just; but it frequently happens, that these being free from the chain of sin, remain indeed in the path of justice, but press not on eagerly to their heavenly country; whilst such as have been sinners, are stung with grief at the remembrance of their former transgressions, and calling to mind how they have forsaken their God, endeavour by present fervour to compensate for their past misconduct. But it must be remembered that there are many just, whose lives cause such joy to the heavenly court, that all the penitential exercises of sinners cannot be preferred before them. S. Gregory, hom. xxxiv.
  • Ver. 8. In the preceding parable, the race of mankind is compared to a lost sheep, to teach us that we are the creatures of the most high God, who made us, and not we ourselves, of whose pasture we are the sheep. Ps. xcix. And in this parable mankind are compared to the drachma, which was lost, to shew us that we have been made to the royal likeness and image even of the omnipotent God; for the drachma is a piece of money, bearing the image of the king. S. Chrysos. In S. Tho. Aquin.
  • Ver. 10. Before the angels. By this it is plain that the spirits in heaven have a concern for us below, and a joy at our repentance, and consequently a knowledge of it. Ch.
  • Ver. 11. A certain man had two sons. By the elder son is commonly expounded the Jewish people, who for a long time had been chosen to serve God; and by the younger son, the Gentiles, who for so many ages had run blindly on in their idolatry and vices. Wi.—Some understand this of the Jews and Gentiles, others of the just and sinners. The former opinion seems preferable. The elder son, brought up in his father’s house, &c. represents the Jews; the younger prodigal is a figure of the Gentiles. Calmet.
  • Ver. 12. It is very probable, from this verse, that the children of the family, when come to age, could demand of their parents the share of property which would fall to their lot. For these parables suppose the ordinary practices of the country, and are founded on what was customarily done. Grotius thinks this was the common law among the Phoenicians.—The Gentiles, prefigured by the prodigal son, received from their father, (the Almighty,) free-will, reason, mind, health, natural knowledge, and the goods which are common to mankind, all which they dissipated and abused. Sinners who have besides received the gift of faith and sanctification, by baptism, and who have profaned the holiness of their state, by crimes, are more express figures of the bad conduct of this son. Calmet.
  • Ver. 16. Husks. This expresses the extreme misery of his condition. There is no need of seeking any other mystery in this world. Horace, by a kind of hyperbole, (B. ii, Ep. 1) represents the miser as living upon husks, to be able to save more.
    Vivit silquis et pane secundo.
    –And no man gave unto him;
    i.e. gave him bread, mentioned before; for as for the husks, he could take what he pleased. Wi.
  • Ver. 18. How merciful is the Almighty, who, though so much offended, still does not disdain the name of father.—I have sinned. These are the first words of a sinner’s confession to the author of nature. God knows all things; still does he expect to hear the voice of your confession. It is in vain to think of concealing your sins from the eyes of him whom nothing can escape; and there can be no danger of acknowledging to him what his infinite knowledge has already embraced. Confess then that Christ may intercede for you, the Church pray for you, the people our forth their tears for you. Fear not that you cannot obtain pardon, for pardon is promised to you; grace, and a reconciliation with a most tender parent, are held out to you. S. Ambrose.—Before thee, &c. By this does our Redeemer shew, that the Almighty is here to be understood by the name of father: for the all-seeing eye of God only beholds all things, from whom even the secret machinations of the heart cannot be concealed. S. Chrys. ex D. Tho.
  • Ver. 22. The first; i.e. the best robe: by it, is meant the habit of grace. Wi.
  • Ver. 24. Was dead, and is come to life again. A sinner, in mortal sin, is deprived of the divine grace, which is the spiritual life of the soul. At his conversion it is restored to him, and he begins to live again. Wi.
  • Ver. 25. His elder son, &c. We have already remarked, that this son represents the Jews. He boasts of having always served his father faithfully, and of never disobeying him. This is the language of that presumptuous people, who believe themselves alone holy; and despising the Gentiles with sovereign contempt, could not bear to see the gates of salvation laid open also to them. The 28th, 29th, and 30th verses express admirably the genius of the Jewish people; particularly his refusing to enter his father’s house, shews their obstinacy. Calmet.
  • Ver. 29. I have never transgressed, &c. With what face could the Jews, represented here by the eldest son, say they had never transgressed the commandments of their father? This made Tertullian think that this was not the expression of the Jews, but of the faithful Christians; and, therefore, he interprets the whole parable as applied to a disciple of Christ. But we should recollect, that it is not uncommon for the presumption to boast of what it never has done. The whole history of the Jews is full of numberless details of their prevarication and disobedience. Calmet.—A kid, &c. The Jews demanded a kid, but the Christians a lamb; therefore was Barabbas set at liberty for them, whilst for us the lamb was immolated. S. Amb.

Daily Scripture Readings Thursday September 9 2010 Memorial of St Peter Claver Priest

September 9 2010 Thursday Memorial of Saint Peter Claver, priest
Disclaimer – Official Readings of the Liturgy at – http://www.usccb.org/nab/

1 Corinthians 8:1b-7, 11-13
Haydock New Testament

NOW concerning those things that are sacrificed to idols, we know that we all have knowledge. Knowledge puffeth up; but charity edifieth. And if any man think that he knoweth any thing, he hath not yet known, as he ought to know. But if any man love God, the same is known by him.

But as for the meats that are offered in sacrifice to idols, we know that an idol is nothing in the world, and that there is no God but one. For though there be that are called gods, either in heaven or on earth (for there are many gods, and many lords);  Yet to us there is but one God, the Father; of whom are all things, and we unto him: and one Lord Jesus Christ: by whom are all things, and we by him.

And through thy knowledge shall the weak brother perish, for whom Christ died? Now when you sin thus against the brethren, and wound their weak conscience, you sin against Christ. Wherefore, if meat scandalize my brother, I will never eat flesh, lest I should scandalize my brother.

Responsorial Psalm 138:1b-3, 13-14ab, 23-24 (Ps 139 NAB/Hebrew)
DR Challoner Text Only

Lord, thou hast proved me,
and known me:
Thou hast known my sitting down,
and my rising up.
Thou hast understood my thoughts afar off:
my path and my line thou hast searched out.
For thou hast possessed my reins:
thou hast protected me from my mother’s womb.
I will praise thee, for thou art fearfully magnified:
wonderful are thy works,
and my soul knoweth right well.
Prove me, O God, and know my heart:
examine me, and know my paths.
And see if there be in me the way of iniquity:
and lead me in the eternal way.

The Holy Gospel of Jesus Christ According to Saint Luke 6:27-38
Haydock New Testament

Jesus said:

But I say to you that hear:
Love your enemies, do good to them that hate you. Bless them that curse you, and pray for them that calumniate you. And to him that striketh thee on the one cheek, offer also the other. And him that taketh away from thee thy cloak, hinder not to take thy coat also. Give to every one that asketh thee, and of him that taketh away thy goods, ask them not again.

And as you would that men should do to you,  do you also to them, in like manner. And if you love them that love you, what thanks have you? For sinners also love those that love them. And if you do good to them that do good to you; what thanks have you? For sinners also do this. And if you lend to them of whom you hope to receive; what thanks have you? For sinners also lend to sinners, to receive as much.

But love ye your enemies:  do good, and lend, hoping for nothing thereby:  and your reward shall be great,  and you shall be the sons of the Most High:  for he is kind to the unthankful, and to the evil.
Be ye, therefore, merciful,  as your father also is merciful.  Judge not, and you shall not be judged:
condemn not, and you shall not be condemned.  Forgive, and you shall be forgiven.

Give, and it shall be given to you: good measure, and pressed down, and shaken together, and running over, shall they give into your bosom. For with the same measure that you shall mete, it shall be measured to you again.

Haydock Commentary 1 Corinthians 8
Notes Copied From Haydock Commentary Site

  • Ver. 1. Now concerning those things. It appears from  this whole passage that the Corinthians had, in a former letter, consulted this apostle, upon the subject of eating meats offered to idols.  It was not unusual to reserve some part of the sacrifice of which they made a supper, either in their own family, with their friends, or sometimes even in the temple.  Some of the Christians of Corinth attended without scruple at these sorts of feasts, and eat of the meats offered to idols; whilst others, on the contrary, took scandal at this conduct, and thought it a tacit approbation of idolatry.  S. Paul being consulted upon this difficulty, gives them his advice in this chapter.  Calmet. We know that we all have knowledge about it.  That is, all we, who are sufficiently instructed, have knowledge enough to be convinced, that idols are nothing in themselves, nor the meats offered to them better nor worse upon that account.  Wi. Knowledge puffeth up, &c.  Knowledge, without charity and humility, serveth only to puff persons up.  Ch.
  • Ver. 4. An idol is nothing. The apostle seems to allude in this place to the Greek signification of this word, eidwlon, signifying a false representation; as for instance in ghosts, which are said to appear sometimes at night.  Umbræ tenues, simulacra luce carentium. Calmet.
  • Ver. 5. Many gods, &c.  Reputed for such among the heathens.  Ch.
  • Ver. 6. To us there is but one God, the Father; of whom all things, and we unto him. Of or from the Father are all things, even the eternal Son and the Holy Ghost, though they are one and the same God with the Father. And one Lord Jesus Christ: by whom are all things, and we by him. All things were created by the Son of God, the eternal and uncreated wisdom of the Father, from whom he proceeds from eternity, and also by the Holy Ghost, all creatures being equally the work of the three divine persons.  The Arians and Socinians pretend from this place, that only the Father is truly and properly God.  The Catholics answer, that he is called the God, of whom all, because from him always proceeded, do proceed, and shall always proceed the Son and the Holy Ghost, though one and the same God in nature, substance, &c.  And that when he is called the one God, by these words are excluded the false gods of the heathens, not the Son, and the Holy Ghost, who are but one God with the Father.  S. Chrys. also here observes, (hom. xx.) that if the two other persons are excluded, because the Father is called one God, by the same way of reasoning it would follow, that because Jesus Christ is called the one Lord, neither the Holy Ghost, nor even the Father, are the one Lord, whereas the Scriptures many times express the divine majesty, as well by the word Lord as by the word God.  Wi.
  • Ver. 7. But knowledge is not in every one, &c.  The new converts, who had been Jews, thought that things which had been offered to idols were defiled, unclean, and could not be lawfully eaten: they who had been Gentiles looked upon them as victims offered to idols, in which there was some virtue of enchantment, &c.  Their weak consciences judged they could not be lawfully eaten: and when they were induced to eat them by the example of others, it was still against their consciences.  The infidels also might sometimes think that the Christians, in eating such things, honoured their idols; in such cases, they who were better instructed, were to abstain, not to give offence to weak consciences, and lest they should make them sin.  And a weak brother shall perish, for whom Christ died; where we may learn, that Christ died also for those the shall perish, and not only for the predestinate.  Wi.
  • Ver. 8-9. Meat doth not commend us to God. It is an admonition to those, who because they knew that meats offered to idols were not worse, would not abstain, even when this scandalized the weak brethren: he tells them that eating or not eating of them, does not make them more acceptable to God, nor puts them to any inconvenience, since they may get other meats: therefore they ought not to make use of their liberty, when it proves a stumbling-block to the weak, and makes them sin.  Wi.
  • Ver. 10. In the idol’s temple.[1]  It does not seem likely that any Christians would go to eat with idolaters in their very temples, of things offered to their idols: so that we may rather understand any place where infidels and Christians eat together, and where it happened that some meats were brought which had been first offered to idols, which the well-instructed Christians regarded not, nor asked any questions about, but the weak scrupled to eat them.  Wi. Shall not his conscience. The meaning of S. Paul’s words is this: Will not your weak brother, who is not endowed with so great a knowledge as you, be induced, from your example, to eat these meats offered to idols, believing that he will derive therefrom some benefit.  Estius.
  • Ver. 13. If meat scandalize. That is, if my eating cause my brother to sin.  Ch. Can we put any meat, or life itself, in competition with a soul, and the blood of Christ, which has been shed for that soul, when we know the value of each!

Haydock Commentary Luke 6:27-38

  • Ver. 30. Jesus Christ does not order us never to refuse a petition: but the meaning of his words is, that we are to give what is just and reasonable, what will be neither injurious to yourself nor your family; for what is unjustly asked, may be justly denied.  S. Austin, l. x. c. 40. de serm. Dom. in Monte. But in this, the sin we commit is often far from trivial; particularly, when to the refusal of a just request, we add also reprehensions and complaints.  For why, say we, does he not labour? why has he reduced himself to penury, through his own indolence? But, tell me, do you live upon the fruits of your own industry?  On the supposition that you do, is it not that you may have some plea to reprehend another for the morsel of bread he begs at your hands?  You give him no charitable relief, give him then no contumelious words: if you have no compassion for him yourself, do not prevent others from shewing him commiseration.  Abraham, in the number of guests he received, had the honour of receiving under his roof even angels.  Let us not, therefore, be strict and unfavourable judges in regard of our suffering and distressed neighbours, lest perhaps we ourselves come to be more severely judged.  S. Chrys. collected from hom. xxi. in ep. ad. Rom. Hom. xi. in ep. ad. Heb. and hom. ii. de Lazaro.
  • Ver. 35. Hoping for nothing, but merely impelled by a desire of doing good.  They who only give when sure of having a greater return, do not give, but traffic with their generosity; in which there is no charity.  A.
  • Ver. 37. What can be imagined more kind, what more merciful, than this conduct of our Sovereign Lord, that the sentence of the judge should be left in the hands of the person to judged?  Jans. Comment. in sanct. Evang.
  • Ver. 38. Here all solicitude of diffidence, all delay of avarice, is cut off; for what truth promises to repay, humility may safe expend.  S. Leo. Serm. vi.

Sunday Scripture Readings September 12 2010 24th Sunday in Ordinary Time

September 12 2010 Twenty Fourth Sunday in Ordinary Time
Disclaimer – Official Readings of the Liturgy at – http://www.usccb.org/nab/

Exodus 32:7-14
Douay-Rheims Challoner

And the Lord spoke to Moses, saying:

Go, get thee down: thy people, which thou hast brought out of the land of Egypt, hath sinned. They have quickly strayed from the way which thou didst shew them: and they have made to themselves a molten calf, and have adored it, and sacrificing victims to it, have said: These are thy gods, O Israel, that have brought thee out of the land of Egypt.

And again the Lord said to Moses:

I see that this people is stiffnecked: Let me alone, that my wrath may be kindled against them, and that I may destroy them, and I will make of thee a great nation.

But Moses besought the Lord his God, saying:

Why, O Lord, is thy indignation enkindled against thy people, whom thou hast brought out of the land of Egypt, with great power, and with a mighty hand? Let not the Egyptians say, I beseech thee: He craftily brought them out, that he might kill them in the mountains, and destroy them from the earth: let thy anger cease, and be appeased upon the wickedness of thy people. Remember Abraham, Isaac, and Israel, thy servants, to whom thou sworest by thy own self, saying: I will multiply your seed as the stars of heaven: and this whole land that I have spoken of, I will give to your seed, and you shall possess it for ever:

And the Lord was appeased from doing the evil which he had spoken against his people.

1 Timothy 1:12-17
Haydock NT

I give thanks to him who hath strengthened me, Christ Jesus our Lord, that he deemed me faithful, putting me in the ministry: Who before was a blasphemer, and a persecutor, and contumelious: but I obtained the mercy of God, because I did it ignorantly in unbelief.

Now the grace of our Lord hath abounded exceedingly with faith and love, which is in Christ Jesus. A faithful saying, and worthy of all acceptation: that Christ Jesus came into this world to save sinners, of whom I am the chief. But for this cause have I obtained mercy: that in me first Christ Jesus might shew forth all patience, for the information of those who shall believe in him unto life everlasting. Now to the king of ages, immortal, invisible, the only God, be honour and glory for ever and ever. Amen.

The Holy Gospel of Jesus Christ According to Saint Luke 15:1-32
Haydock New Testament

NOW the publicans and sinners drew near unto him, to hear him. And the Pharisees and the Scribes murmured, saying:

This man receiveth sinners, and eateth with them.

And he spoke to them this parable, saying:

What man among you that hath a hundred sheep, and if he shall lose one of them, doth he not leave the ninety-nine in the desert, and go after that which is lost until he find it? And when he hath found it, doth he not lay it upon his shoulders rejoicing: And coming home call together his friends and neighbors, saying to them: Rejoice with me, because I have found my sheep that was lost?

I say to you, that even so there shall be joy in heaven upon one sinner that doth penance, more than upon ninety-nine just who need not penance. Or what woman, having ten groats, if she lose one groat, doth not light a candle and sweep the house, and seek diligently, till she find it? And when she hath found it, call together her friends and neighbours, saying:

Rejoice with me, because I have found the groat which I had lost.

So I say to you, there shall be joy before the Angels of God upon one sinner doing penance.

And he said:

A certain man had two sons: And the younger of them said to his father:

Father, give me the portion of substance that falleth to me.

And he divided until them his substance. And not many days after, the younger son gathering all together, went abroad into a far country: and there wasted his substance by living riotously. And after he had spent all, there came a might famine in that country, and he began to be in want.  And he went, and joined himself to one of the citizens of that country. And he sent him into his farm to feed swine. And he would fain have filled his belly with the husks the swine did eat: and no man gave unto him. And returning to himself, he said:

How many hired servants in my father’s house have plenty of bread, and I here perish with hunger? I will arise, and will go to my father, and say to him: ‘Father, I have sinned against heaven, and before thee: I am not now worthy to be called thy son: make me as one of thy hired servants.’

And rising up, he went to his father. And when he was yet a great way off, his father saw him, and was moved with compassion, and running to him, fell upon his neck and kissed him. And the son said to him:

Father, I have sinned against heaven and before thee: I am not now worthy to be called thy son.

But the father said to his servants:

Bring forth, quickly, the first robe, and put it on him, and put a ring on his hand, and shoes on his feet: And bring hither the fatted calf, and kill it, and let us eat and make merry: Because this, my son, was dead, and is come to life again: he was lost and is found.

And they began to be merry. Now his elder son was in the field: and when he came and drew nigh to the house, he heard music and dancing: And he called one of the servants, and asked what these things meant. And he said to him:

Thy brother is come, and thy father hath killed the fatted calf, because he hath received him safe.

And he was angry, and would not go in. His father, therefore, coming out, began to entreat him. And he answering, said to his father:

Behold, for so many years do I serve thee, and I have never transgressed thy commandment, and yet thou hast never given me a kid to make merry with my friends: But as soon as this, thy son, is come, who hath devoured his substance with harlots, thou hast killed for him the fatted calf.

But he said to him:

Son, thou art always with me, and all I have is thine. But it was fit that we should make merry and be glad, for this, thy brother, was dead, and is come to life again: he was lost, and is found.

Haydock Commentary Exodus 32:7-14

  • Ver. 7. Thy people. They are not worthy to be styled my people; and thou didst ratify the covenant with me, in their name, and as their interpreter. They have sinned, giving way to idolatry in thought, word, and deed.
  • Ver. 9. And again. The Sept. omit this verse. Moses, at the first intimation of the people’s sin, fell prostrate before the Lord, to sue for pardon, and pleaded the natural weakness of an ungovernable multitude, in order to extenuate their fault. This God admits.—I see, &c. But while he seems bent on punishing them, to try his servant, he encourages him inwardly to pray with fervour. Salien.
  • Ver. 10. Alone One fully determined on revenge will bear with no expostulation; whence S. Greg. (Mor. ix. 11,) and Theodoret (q. 67,) look upon this as an incitement to pray more earnestly, seeing God’s servants have such influence over Him. The mercy of God struggled with his justice, and stopped its effects.—Nation, as I promised to Abraham; or I will make thee ruler over a nation greater than this, as Moses explains it, (Deut. ix. 14,) and as the like offer is made, Num. xiv. 12. The Sam. Subjoins here, “And God was likewise much irritated against Aaron, and would have destroyed him; but Moses prayed for him:” which we are assured was the case. Deut. ix. 20. C.
  • Ver. 11. Why, &c. Calvin here accuses Moses of arrogance, in prescribing laws to God’s justice. But S. Jerome (ep. ad Gaud.) commends his charity and “prayer, which hindered God’s power.” W.
  • Ver. 12. Craftily. Heb. “with a malicious design.” Moses insinuates, that the glory of God is interested not to punish the Hebrews, lest the Gentiles should *plaspheme, particularly as the land of Chanaan seemed to be promised unconditionally to the posterity of Abraham, who were now, all but one, to be exterminated. H.
  • Ver. 13. Thy servants. Thus God honours his friends, and rewards their merits, which are the effects of his grace. W.
  • Ver. 14. Appeased. Yet of this Moses was not fully assured, and in effect only those who had been less guilty, were reprieved to be punished afterwards. V. 30. 35. H.

Haydock Commentary 1 Timothy 1:12-17

  • Ver. 13. Because I did it ignorantly in unbelief, or in incredulity. Not that we can think it an invincible and altogether an inculpable ignorance, such as would have made S. Paul blameless in the sight of God. It was through his pure mercy that he called S. Paul, when his great sins and false zeal made him a greater object of the divine mercy: and God in him was pleased to make known to all men his wonderful patience, that no sinners might despair. The grace of God was superabounding, or exceedingly abundant in him. Wi.
  • Ver. 15. Christ Jesus, the true Son of God, came into this world to save sinners, of whom (says S. Paul) I am the chief, the first, the greatest. Wi.

Haydock Commentary Luke Chapter 15

  • Ver. 4. What man, &c. Christ left the ninety-nine in the desert, when he descended from the angelic choirs, in order to seek last man on the earth, that he might fill up the number of the sheepfold of heaven, from which his sins had excluded him. S. Amb.—Neither did his affection for the last sheep make him behave cruelly to the rest; for he left them in safety, under the protection of his omnipotent hand. S. Cyril ex D. Thoma Aquin.
  • Ver. 7. Joy in heaven, &c. What incitement ought it not to be to use to practise virtue, when we reflect that our conversion causes joy to the troops of blessed spirits, whose protection we should always seek, and whose presence we should always revere. S. Amb.—There is greater joy for the conversion of a sinner, than for the perseverance of the just; but it frequently happens, that these being free from the chain of sin, remain indeed in the path of justice, but press not on eagerly to their heavenly country; whilst such as have been sinners, are stung with grief at the remembrance of their former transgressions, and calling to mind how they have forsaken their God, endeavour by present fervour to compensate for their past misconduct. But it must be remembered that there are many just, whose lives cause such joy to the heavenly court, that all the penitential exercises of sinners cannot be preferred before them. S. Gregory, hom. xxxiv.
  • Ver. 8. In the preceding parable, the race of mankind is compared to a lost sheep, to teach us that we are the creatures of the most high God, who made us, and not we ourselves, of whose pasture we are the sheep. Ps. xcix. And in this parable mankind are compared to the drachma, which was lost, to shew us that we have been made to the royal likeness and image even of the omnipotent God; for the drachma is a piece of money, bearing the image of the king. S. Chrysos. In S. Tho. Aquin.
  • Ver. 10. Before the angels. By this it is plain that the spirits in heaven have a concern for us below, and a joy at our repentance, and consequently a knowledge of it. Ch.
  • Ver. 11. A certain man had two sons. By the elder son is commonly expounded the Jewish people, who for a long time had been chosen to serve God; and by the younger son, the Gentiles, who for so many ages had run blindly on in their idolatry and vices. Wi.—Some understand this of the Jews and Gentiles, others of the just and sinners. The former opinion seems preferable. The elder son, brought up in his father’s house, &c. represents the Jews; the younger prodigal is a figure of the Gentiles. Calmet.
  • Ver. 12. It is very probable, from this verse, that the children of the family, when come to age, could demand of their parents the share of property which would fall to their lot. For these parables suppose the ordinary practices of the country, and are founded on what was customarily done. Grotius thinks this was the common law among the Phoenicians.—The Gentiles, prefigured by the prodigal son, received from their father, (the Almighty,) free-will, reason, mind, health, natural knowledge, and the goods which are common to mankind, all which they dissipated and abused. Sinners who have besides received the gift of faith and sanctification, by baptism, and who have profaned the holiness of their state, by crimes, are more express figures of the bad conduct of this son. Calmet.
  • Ver. 16. Husks. This expresses the extreme misery of his condition. There is no need of seeking any other mystery in this world. Horace, by a kind of hyperbole, (B. ii, Ep. 1) represents the miser as living upon husks, to be able to save more.
    Vivit silquis et pane secundo.
    –And no man gave unto him;
    i.e. gave him bread, mentioned before; for as for the husks, he could take what he pleased. Wi.
  • Ver. 18. How merciful is the Almighty, who, though so much offended, still does not disdain the name of father.—I have sinned. These are the first words of a sinner’s confession to the author of nature. God knows all things; still does he expect to hear the voice of your confession. It is in vain to think of concealing your sins from the eyes of him whom nothing can escape; and there can be no danger of acknowledging to him what his infinite knowledge has already embraced. Confess then that Christ may intercede for you, the Church pray for you, the people our forth their tears for you. Fear not that you cannot obtain pardon, for pardon is promised to you; grace, and a reconciliation with a most tender parent, are held out to you. S. Ambrose.—Before thee, &c. By this does our Redeemer shew, that the Almighty is here to be understood by the name of father: for the all-seeing eye of God only beholds all things, from whom even the secret machinations of the heart cannot be concealed. S. Chrys. ex D. Tho.
  • Ver. 22. The first; i.e. the best robe: by it, is meant the habit of grace. Wi.
  • Ver. 24. Was dead, and is come to life again. A sinner, in mortal sin, is deprived of the divine grace, which is the spiritual life of the soul. At his conversion it is restored to him, and he begins to live again. Wi.
  • Ver. 25. His elder son, &c. We have already remarked, that this son represents the Jews. He boasts of having always served his father faithfully, and of never disobeying him. This is the language of that presumptuous people, who believe themselves alone holy; and despising the Gentiles with sovereign contempt, could not bear to see the gates of salvation laid open also to them. The 28th, 29th, and 30th verses express admirably the genius of the Jewish people; particularly his refusing to enter his father’s house, shews their obstinacy. Calmet.
  • Ver. 29. I have never transgressed, &c. With what face could the Jews, represented here by the eldest son, say they had never transgressed the commandments of their father? This made Tertullian think that this was not the expression of the Jews, but of the faithful Christians; and, therefore, he interprets the whole parable as applied to a disciple of Christ. But we should recollect, that it is not uncommon for the presumption to boast of what it never has done. The whole history of the Jews is full of numberless details of their prevarication and disobedience. Calmet.—A kid, &c. The Jews demanded a kid, but the Christians a lamb; therefore was Barabbas set at liberty for them, whilst for us the lamb was immolated. S. Amb.

Daily Scripture Readings Tuesday September 7 2010 23rd Week in Ordinary Time

September 7 2010 Tuesday Twenty Third Week in Ordinary Time
Disclaimer – Official Readings of the Liturgy at – http://www.usccb.org/nab/

The First Epistle of S Paul, the Apostle, to the Corinthians 6:1-11
Haydock New Testament

DARE any of you, having a matter against another, go to the law before the unjust, and not before the saints? Know you not that the saints shall judge this world? And if the world shall be judged by you, are you unworthy to judge the smallest matters? Know you not that we shall judge angels? How much more things of this world? If therefore you have judgments about the things of this world: set them to judge, who are the most despised in the church.

I speak to your shame. Is it so that there is not among you any wise man that is able to judge between his brethren? But brother goeth to law with brother: and that before unbelievers? Already indeed there is plainly a fault among you, that you have law-suits one with another. Why do you not rather take the injury? Why do you not rather suffer fraud? But you do wrong and defraud: and that to your brethren.

Know you not that the unjust shall not possess the kingdom of God? Be not deceived: neither fornicators, nor idolaters, nor adulterers, Nor the effeminate, nor sodomites, nor thieves, nor the covetous, nor drunkards, nor railers, nor extortioners, shall possess the kingdom of God. And such some of you were: but you are washed, but you are sanctified, but you are justified in the name of our Lord Jesus Christ, and in the spirit of our God.

Ps 149:1b-6a and 9b
DR Challoner Text Only

Sing ye to the Lord a new canticle:
let his praise be in the church of the saints.
Let Israel rejoice in him that made him:
and let the children of Sion be joyful in their king.
Let them praise his name in choir:
let them sing to him with the timbrel and the psaltery.
For the Lord is well pleased with his people:
and he will exalt the meek unto salvation.
The saints shall rejoice in glory:
they shall be joyful in their beds.
The high praises of God shall be in their mouth
This glory is to all his saints. Alleluia.

The Holy Gospel of Jesus Christ According to Saint Luke 6:12-19
Haydock New Testament

And it came to pass in those days, that he (Jesus) went out into a mountain to pray, and he passed the whole night in the prayer of God. And when it was day, he called his disciples: and he chose twelve of them, (whom also he named apostles: ) Simon, whom he surnamed Peter, and Andrew, his brother, James and John, Philip and Bartholomew, Matthew and Thomas, James, the son of Alpheus, and Simon, who is called Zelotes: And Jude, the brother of James, and Judas Iscariot, who was the traitor.

And coming down with them, he stood in an open plain, and the company of his disciples, and a very great multitude of people from all Judea and Jerusalem, and the sea-coast both of Tyre and Sidon, Who had come to hear him, and to be healed of their diseases. And they that were troubled with unclean spirits, were cured. And all the multitude sought to touch him, for virtue went out from him, and healed all.

Haydock Commentary 1 Corinthians 6:1-11
Notes Copied From Haydock Commentary Site

  • Ver. 1. Go to law before the unjust. S. Paul here dissuades the new Christians from carrying their differences and causes about their temporal concerns before judges who were infidels, especially seeing the saints and the elect shall one day judge, that is, condemn all the wicked, and even the apostate angels, by approving the sentence which Christ shall pronounce against them at the day of judgment.  Wi. It was not unusual in the primitive ages, and even under Christian emperors, for the Catholics to refer their disputes to the bishop, and to abide by his decision, as Possidius informs us, in the life of S. Augustin.  Est.
  • Ver. 3. Judge angels? That is, the wicked angels, the devils.  S. Tho. Aqui.
  • Ver. 4-7. Set them to judge, who are the most despised in the Church. Rather make choice of Christians of lesser parts and talents, than have recourse to infidels, who will be scandalized at the injuries and injustice done by Christians to each other.  Besides you cannot but have some wise men among you to decide such matters.  Wi. S. Paul does not here mean to tell the Corinthians that they must choose the most despised and the most ignorant, but he wishes to inform them that if there were none but men of this description in the Church, it would still be more preferable to appoint these judges than to go to law before idolatrous judges.  Estius. It is plainly a fault,[1] weakness in you to run to such heathen judges: you should rather bear, and put up with the injuries done to you. A fault. Law-suits can hardly ever be without a fault, on one side or the other; and oftentimes on both sides.  Ch.
  • Ver. 8-11. Defraud . . . your brethren. That is, you still make yourselves much more guilty by the injustices done to one another: for the unjust, and all they who are guilty of such crimes as I have mentioned, shall not possess the kingdom of God. And some of you were guilty of part of them, which have been washed off by your conversion, and your baptism, when you were justified. Wi. And such some of you were. It is probable that this was added by the apostle, to soften his preceding words, lest he might seem to accuse all the Corinthians of each of these sins, and he likewise adds, such indeed you were, but now you are washed, &c. &c.  Estius, S. Tho. Aq.

Haydock Commentary Luke 6:12-19

  • Ver. 13. These twelve Christ chose as individual companions and domestics.  To these he committed the charge of founding and governing his Church.  He sent them as legates, or ambassadors, (for this is the import of the word apostle) to all the world.  Hence their power was more universal than that of bishops, which is confined to their own dioceses or districts.  The jurisdiction of the apostles was not limited to place.  Tirinus. This power which Jesus Christ delegated to his apostles, and which was for the benefit and regulation  of the universal Church in all future ages, the apostles, in their turn, delegated to their successors in the ministry, with such regulations and limitations as have been judged in the Holy Ghost necessary for the proper government of the spiritual kingdom of God upon earth.  And it is the height of presumption to question any ordinations that come to us with the authority of the Catholic Church: for, “whatever the Church says, is true; whatever she permits is lawful; whatever she forbids, is evil; whatever she ordains, is holy; whatever she institutes, is good.”  S. Augustine. How futile then is the objection of Calvin, who pretends that an apostle, being nothing but a legate, can make no laws, nor prescribe or teach any thing not expressed in his mandatum! Calvin, Inst. l. iv. c. 8.
  • Ver. 16. Judas, surnamed Thaddeus in S. Matt. x. 3. and in S. Mark iii. 18.  At the head of his epistle he styles himself Judas, brother of James.  V.
  • Ver. 17. To a more extended and even part of the mountain, as we learn from comparing this text with S. Matt. v. 1. as it was from the mountain that Jesus Christ addressed to the people the following discourse.  V.