Daily Scripture Readings Thursday December 31 2009 7th Day in the Octave of Christmas

December 31 2009 Thursday The Seventh Day in the Octave of Christmas
Saint of the Day – St. Sylvester I

About the sources used. The readings on this site are not official for the Mass of Roman Rite of the Catholic Church in the USA, but are from sources free from copyright. They are here to present the comparable readings alongside traditional Catholic commentary as published in the Haydock Bible for your own personal study. Readings vary depending on your local calendar.

Official Readings of the Liturgy at – http://www.usccb.org/nab/readings/123109.shtml

1 John 2:18-21
Haydock New Testament

Little children, it is the last hour: and as you have heard that antichrist cometh, and now there are many antichrists: whereby we know that it is the last hour. They went out from us, but they were not of us. For if they had been of us, they would have certainly remained with us: but that they may be manifest, that they are not all of us. But you have an unction from the Holy One, and you know all things. I have not written to you as to those who know not the truth, but as to those who know it: and that no lie is of the truth.

Responsorial Psalm 95:1-2, 11-13 (Ps 96 NAB)
DR Challoner Text Only

Sing ye to the Lord a new canticle:
sing to the Lord, all the earth.
Sing ye to the Lord and bless his name:
shew forth his salvation from day to day.
Let the heavens rejoice, and let the earth be glad,
let the sea be moved, and the fulness thereof:
The fields and all things that are in them shall be joyful.
Then shall all the trees of the woods rejoice
before the face of the Lord, because he cometh:
because he cometh to judge the earth.
He shall judge the world with justice,
and the people with his truth.

The Holy Gospel of Jesus Christ According to Saint John 1:1-18
Haydock New Testament

IN the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God. The same was in the beginning with God. All things were made by him: and without him was made nothing that was made. In him was life, and the life was the light of men. And the light shineth in darkness, and the darkness did not comprehend it.

There was a man sent from God, whose name was John. This man came for a witness, to bear witness of the light, that all men might believe through him. He was not the light, but was to bear witness of the light. That was the true light, which enlighteneth every man that cometh into this world.

He was in the world, and the world was made by him, and the world knew him not. He came unto his own, and his own received him not. But as many as received him, he gave to them power to be made the sons of God, to them that believe in his name. Who are born, not of blood, nor of the will of the flesh, nor of the will of man, but of God.

And the Word was made flesh, and dwelt among us: and we saw his glory, the glory as of the only begotten of the Father, full of grace and truth. John beareth witness of him: and crieth out, saying:

This was he of whom I spoke, He that shall come after me, is preferred before me, because he was before me.

And of his fullness we all have received, and grace for grace. For the law was given by Moses, grace and truth came by Jesus Christ. No man hath seen God at any time: the only begotten Son who is in the bosom of the Father, he hath declared him.

Haydock Commentary 1 John 2:18-21
Notes Copied From Haydock Commentary Site

  • Ver. 18. It is the last hour. That is, according to the common interpretation, the last age of the world, from the coming of Christ to the day of judgment, and the end of the world, which S. Paul calls the end and consummation of ages.  Heb. ix. 26. And as you have heard that antichrist (the great antichrist) cometh, or is to come in this last age: now there are already many antichrists; i.e. as the word signifies, many adversaries to Christ, who are forerunners of the great and last antichrist.  Wi. Many antichrists; that is, many heretics, enemies of Christ and his Church, and forerunners of the great antichrist.  Ch. S. Cyprian says all are called antichrists that have divided themselves from the charity and unity of the Catholic Church.  Ep. lxxvii. ad Magnum. Whereby we know that it is the last hour, it being foretold that many false prophets should rise in the last days.  Mat. xxiv. 11. &c.  Wi.
  • Ver. 19. They were not of us, true and profitable members; though it can scarce be doubted but that some of them, at least for some time, truly believed: and by their going off, God was pleased to make it manifest that they were not of his faithful members.  Such were Simon Magus, Cerinthus, Ebion, Nicolas of Antioch, &c.  Wi. They, &c.  That is, they were not solid, steadfast, genuine Christians, otherwise they would have remained in the Church.  Ch. The true note or mark of heresy, is the going out of or leaving the Catholic Church.  God permitteth some to go out, that the true and tried faithful may be known.
  • Ver. 20. You have an unction from the holy one. You are sufficiently instructed by the grace and spirit of God against such false teachers.  Wi. An unction, &c.  That is, grace and wisdom from the Holy Ghost.  Ch. And you know all things, as to what you ought to believe and practise, and therefore I have not written to you as to ignorant persons.  Wi. The true children of God’s Church, remaining in unity, under the guidance of their lawful pastors, partake of the grace of the Holy Ghost, promised to the Church and her pastors; and have in the Catholic Church all necessary knowledge and instruction, so as to have no need to seek it elsewhere, since it can be only found in that society of which they are members.  Ch.

Haydock Commentary John 1:1-18

  • Ver. 1. In the beginning was the word:[1] or rather, the word was in the beginning. The eternal word, the increated wisdom, the second Person of the blessed Trinity, the only begotten Son of the Father, as he is here called (v. 14.) of the same nature and substance, and the same God, with the Father and Holy Ghost.  This word was always; so that it was never true to say, he was not, as the Arians blasphemed.  This word was in the beginning. Some, by the beginning, expound the Father himself, in whom he was always.  Others give this plain and obvious sense, that the word, or the Son of God, was, when all other things began to have a being; he never began, but was from all eternity. And the word was with God; i.e. was with the Father; and as it is said, (v. 18) in the bosom of the Father; which implies, that he is indeed a distinct person, but the same in nature and substance with the Father and the Holy Ghost.  This is repeated again in the second verse, as repetitions are very frequent in S. John. And the word was God. This without question is the construction; where, according to the letter we read, and God was the word. Wi. The Greek for the word is LogoV, which signifies not only the exterior word, but also the interior word, or thought; and in this latter sense it is taken here.  V. Philo Judæus, in the apostolic age, uses the word LogoV, p. 823, to personify the wisdom and the power of God.  LogoV estin eikwn Qeou di ou sumpaV o KosmoV edhmiourgeito.  By a similar metonymy, Jesus Christ is called the way, the truth, the life, the resurrection. And the word was God. Here the eternity and the divinity of the second Person are incontrovertibly established; or, we must say that language has no longer a fixed meaning, and that it is impossible to establish any point whatever from the words of Scripture.  A.
  • Ver. 2. The same was in the beginning with God. In the text is only, “this was in the beginning;” but the sense and construction certainly is, this word was in the beginning.  Wi.
  • Ver. 3. All things were made by him,[2] and without him was made nothing that was made. These words teach us, that all created being, visible or invisible on earth, every thing that ever was made, or began to be, were made, produced, and created by this eternal word, or by the Son of God.  The same is truly said of the Holy Ghost; all creatures being equally produced, created, and preserved by the three divine Persons as, by their proper, principal, and efficient cause, in the same manner, and by the same action: not by the Son, in any manner inferior to the Father; nor as if the Son produced things only ministerially, and acted only as the minister, and instrument of the Father, as the Arians pretended.  In this sublime mystery of one God and three distinct Persons, if we consider the eternal processions, and personal proprieties, the Father is the first Person, but not by any priority of time, or of dignity; all the three divine Persons being eternal, or co-eternal, equal in all perfections, being one in nature, in substance, in power, in majesty: in a word, one and the same God.  The Father in no other sense is called the first Person, but because he proceeds from none, or from no other person: and the eternal Son is the second Person begotten, and proceeding from him, the Father, from all eternity, proceeds now, and shall proceed from him for all eternity; as we believe that the third divine Person, the Holy Ghost, always proceeded without any beginning, doth now proceed, and shall proceed for ever, both from the Father and the Son.  But when we consider and speak of any creatures, of any thing that was made, or had a beginning, all things were equally created in time, and are equally preserved, no less by the Son, and by the Holy Ghost, than by the Father. For this reason S. John tells us again in this chapter, (v. 10.) that the world was made by the word.  And our Saviour himself (Jo. v. 19.) tells us, that whatsoever the Father doth, these things also in like manner, or in the same manner, the Son doth. Again the apostle, (Heb. i. v. 2.) speaking of the Son, says, the world was made by him: and in the same chapter, (v. 10.) he applies to the Son these words, (Psalm ci. 26.) And thou, O Lord, in the beginning didst found the earth: and the heavens are the works of thy hands, &c.  To omit other places, S. Paul again, writing to the Colossians, (C. i. v. 16, 17.) and speaking of God’s beloved Son, as may be seen in that chapter, says, that in him all things were created, visible and invisibleall things were created in him, and by him, or, as it is in the Greek, unto him, and for him; to shew that the Son was not only the efficient cause, the Maker and Creator of all things, but also the last end of all.  Which is also confirmed by the following words: And he is before all, and all things subsist in him, or consist in him; as in the Rheims and Protestant translations.  I have, therefore, in this third verse, translated, all things were made by him, with all English translations and paraphrases, whether made by Catholics or Protestants; and not all things were made through him, lest through should seem to carry with it a different and a diminishing signification; or as if, in the creation of the world, the eternal word, or the Son of God, produced things only ministerially, and, in a manner, inferior to the Father, as the Arians and Eunomians pretended; against whom, on this account, wrote S. Basil, lib. de spiritu Sto. S. Chrysostom, and S. Cyril, on this very verse; where they expressly undertake to shew that the Greek text in this verse no ways favours these heretics.  The Arians, and now the Socinians, who deny the Son to be true God, or that the word God applies as properly to him as to the Father, but would have him called God, that is, a nominal god, in an inferior and improper sense; as when Moses called the goa of Pharao; (Exod. vii. 1.) or as men in authority are called gods; (Psalm lxxxi. 6.) pretend, after Origen, to find another difference in the Greek text; as if, when mention is made of the Father, he is styled the God; but that the Son is only called God, or a God. This objection S. Chrysostom, S. Cyril, and others, have shewn to be groundless: that pretended significant Greek article being several times omitted, when the word God is applied to God the Father; and being found in other places, when the Son of God is called God.  See this objection fully and clearly answered by the author of a short book, published in the year 1729, against Dr. Clark and Mr. Whiston, p. 64, and seq.  Wi. Were made, &c.  Mauduit here represents the word: “1. As a cause, or principle, acting extraneously from himself upon the void space, in order to give a being to all creatures:” whereas there was no void space before the creation.  Ante omnia Deus erat solus, ipse sibe et mundus et locus, et omnia.  Tertullian, l. cont. Prax. c. v.  And S. Aug. in Ps. cxxii. says: antequam faceret Deus Sanctos, ubi habitabat? In se habitabat, apud se habitabat. The creation of all things, visible and invisible, was the work of the whole blessed Trinity; but the Scriptures generally attribute it to the word; because wisdom, reason, and intelligence, which are the attributes of the Son, are displayed most in it.  Calmet. What wonderful tergiversations the Arians used to avoid the evidence of this text, we see in S. Austin, l. iii. de doct. Christ. c. 2; even such as modern dissenters do, to avoid the evidence of This is my Body, concerning the blessed Eucharist.  B.
  • Ver. 4. In him: i.e. in this word, or Son of God, was life; because he give life to every creature.  Or, as Maldonatus expounds it, because he is the author of grace, which is the spiritual life of our souls. And the life was the light of men, whether we expound it of a rational soul and understanding, which he gives to all men; or of the spiritual life, and those lights of graces, which he gives to Christians.  Wi.
  • Ver. 5. And the light shineth, or did shine, in darkness. Many understand this, that the light of reason, which God gave to every  one, might have brought them to the knowledge of God by the visible effects of his Providence in this world: but the darkness did not comprehend it, because men, blinded by their passions, would not attend to the light of reason.  Or we may again understand it, with Maldonatus, of the lights of grace, against which obstinate sinners wilfully shut their eyes.  Wi.
  • Ver. 7. That all men might believe through him; i.e. by John the Baptist’s preaching, who was God’s instrument to  induce them to believe in Jesus the Christ, or the Messias, their only Redeemer.  Wi.
  • Ver. 8-9. He; that is John the Baptist, was not the true light: but the word was the true light.  In the translation, it is necessary to express that the word was the true light, lest any one should think that John the Baptist was this light.  Wi.
  • Ver. 10. He was in the world, &c.  Many of the ancient interpreters understand this verse of Christ as God, who was in the world from its first creation, producing and governing all things: but the blind sinful world did not know and worship him.  Others apply these words to the Son of God made man; whom even God’s own chosen people, the Jews, at his coming, refused to receive and believe in  him.  Wi.
  • Ver. 11. His own. This regards principally the Jews.  Jesus came to them as into his own family, but they did not receive him.  It may likewise be extended to the Gentiles, who had groaned so long a time in darkness, and only seemed to wait for the rising sun of justice to run to its light.  They likewise did not receive him.  These words, though apparently general, must be understood with restriction; as there were some, though comparatively few, of both Jews and Gentiles, who embraced the faith.  Calmet.
  • Ver. 12. He gave to them  power to be made the adoptive sons of God, and heirs of the kingdom of heaven.  They are made the children of God by believing and by a new spiritual birth in the sacrament of baptism, not of blood; (literally, no of bloods) not by the will, and desires of the flesh, not by the will of men, nor by human generation, as children are first born of their natural parents, but of God, by faith and divine grace.  W.
  • Ver. 14. And the word was made flesh. This word, or Son of God, who was in the beginning, from all eternity, at the time appointed by the divine decrees, was made flesh, i.e. became man, by a true and physical union of his divine person, (from which the divine nature was inseparable) to our human nature, to a human soul, and a human body, in the womb, and of the substance, of his virgin Mother.  From the moment of Christ’s incarnation, as all Christians are taught to believe, he that was God from eternity, became also true man.  In Jesus Christ, our blessed Redeemer, we believe one divine Person with two natures, and two wills; the one divine, the other human: by which substantial union, one and the same Person became truly both God and man; not two persons, or two sons, as Nestorius, the heretic, pretended.  By this union, and a mutual communication of the proprieties of each nature, it is true to say, that the Son of God, remaining unchangeably God, was made man; and therefore that God was truly conceived and born of the virgin Mary, who, on this account, was truly the Mother of God: that God was born, suffered, and died on the cross, to redeem and save us.  The word, in this manner made man, dwelt in us, or among us, by this substantial union with our human nature, not morally only, nor after such a manner, as God is said to dwell in a temple;  nor as he is in his faithful servants, by a spiritual union, that the same person  is truly both God and man. And we saw his glory, manifested to the world by many signs and  miracles; we in particular, who were present at his transfiguration.  Matt. xvii. Full of grace and truth. These words, in the construction, are to be joined in this manner: the word dwelt in us, full of grace and truth; and we have seen his glory, &c.  This fulness of grace in Christ Jesus, infinitely surpassed the limited fulness, which the Scripture attributes to S. Stephen, (Acts vi. 8.) or to the blessed virgin Mother: (Luke i. 28.) they are said to be full of grace, only because of an extraordinary communication and greater share of graces than was given to other saints.  But Christ, even as man, his grace and sanctity were infinite, as was his person. As of the only begotten of the Father.[3]  If we consider Christ in himself, and not only as he was made known to men by outward signs and miracles, S. Chrysostom and others take notice that the word as, no ways diminisheth the signification; and that the sense is, we have seen the glory of him, who is truly from all eternity the only begotten Son of the Father: who, as the Scriptures assure us, is his true, his proper Son, his only begotten, who was sent into the world, who descended from heaven, and came from the Father, and leaving the world, returned where he was before, returned to his Father. We shall meet with many such Scripture texts, to shew him to be the eternal Son of his eternal Father; or to shew that the Father was always his Father, and the Son always his Son: as it was the constant doctrine of the Catholic Church, and as such declared in the general council of Nice, that this, his only Son, was born or begotten of the Father before all ages . . . God from God, the true God from the true God. It was by denying this truth, “that the Son was the Son always, and the Father always, and from all eternity, the Father;” that the blaspheming Arius began his heresy in his letter to Eusebius of Nicomedia, against his bishop of Alexandria, S. Alexander.  See the letter copied by S. Epiphan. Hær. 69. p. 731. Ed. Petavii.  Wi. Dwelt among us. In a material body, like ours, clothed with our nature.  He is become mortal, and like us in every thing, but sin and concupiscence.  The Greek literally translated, is, he has pitched his tent amongst us, like a stranger and passenger, who makes no long stay in one place.  The body in Scripture, is sometimes called a tent or tabernacle, in which the soul dwells, as 2 Pet. i. 14.  Calmet.
  • Ver. 15. Is preferred before me.[4]  Lit. is made before me. The sense, says S. Chrys. is, that he is greater in dignity, deserves greater honour, &c. though born after me, he was from eternity.  Wi.
  • Ver. 16. And of his fulness we all have received; not only Jews, but also all nations. And grace for grace.[5]  It may perhaps be translated grace upon grace, as Mr. Blackwall observes, and brings a parallel example in Greek out of Theognis, p. 164.  It implies abundance of graces, and greater graces under the new law of Christ than in the time of the law of Moses; which exposition is confirmed by the following verse.  Wi. Before the coming of the Messias all men had the light of reason.  The Greeks had their philosophy, the Jews the law and prophets.  All this was a grace and favour bestowed by God, the author of all good.  But since the word was made flesh, and caused the gospel of salvation to be announced to all men; he has invited all nations to the faith and knowledge of the truth.  Thus he has given us one grace for another; but the second is infinitely greater, more excellent, and more abundant than the first.  The following verse seems to insinuate, that the evangelist means the law by the first grace, and the gospel by the second.  Compare likewise Rom. i. 17.  The Jews were conducted by faith to faith; by faith in God and the law of Moses, to the faith of the gospel, announced by Christ.  Calmet.
  • Ver. 18. No man hath seen God. No mortal in this life by a perfect union and enjoyment of him.  Nor can any creature perfectly comprehend his infinite greatness: none but his only begotten divine Son, who is in the bosom of his Father, not only by an union of grace, but by an union and unity of substance and nature; of which Christ said, (Jo. xiv. 11.) I am in the Father, and the Father in me. Wi.
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Sunday Scripture Readings January 3 2010 The Epiphany of the Lord

Post moved to match the calendar. These posts were published before their proper calendar day to give those who wish to prepare before Sunday Mass time to reflect on the readings and commentaries and are then moved to the proper day once traffic has diminished. CLICK HERE to find the readings for January 3 2010 The Epiphany of the Lord 2010

Daily Scripture Readings Wednesday 6th Day in the Octave of Christmas

December 30 2009 Wednesday The Sixth Day in the Octave of Christmas
Saint of the Day – St. Egwin

About the sources used. The readings on this site are not official for the Mass of Roman Rite of the Catholic Church in the USA, but are from sources free from copyright. They are here to present the comparable readings alongside traditional Catholic commentary as published in the Haydock Bible for your own personal study. Readings vary depending on your local calendar.

Official Readings of the Liturgy at – http://www.usccb.org/nab/readings/123009.shtml

1 John 2:12-17
Haydock New Testament

I write to you, little children, because your sins are forgiven you for his name’s sake. I write to you, fathers, because you have known him, who is from the beginning. I write to you, young men, because you have overcome the wicked one. I write to you, infants, because you have known the Father. I write to you, young me, because you are strong, and the word of God abideth in you, and you have overcome the wicked one. Love not the world, nor those things which are in the world. If any man love the world, the charity of the Father is not in him: For all that is in the world, is the concupiscence of the flesh, and the concupiscence of the eyes, and the pride of life: which is not of the Father, but is of the world. And the world passeth away, and the concupiscence thereof. But he that doth the will of God, abideth for ever.

Responsorial Psalm 95:7-8a, 8b-9, 10 (Ps 96 NAB)
DR Challoner Text Only

Bring ye to the Lord, O ye kindreds of the Gentiles,
bring ye to the Lord glory and honour:
Bring to the Lord glory unto his name.
Bring up sacrifices, and come into his courts:
Adore ye the Lord in his holy court.
Let all the earth be moved at his presence.
Say ye among the Gentiles, the Lord hath reigned.
For he hath corrected the world, which shall not be moved:
he will judge the people with justice.

The Holy Gospel of Jesus Christ According to Saint Luke 2:36-40
Haydock New Testament

And there was on Anna, a prophetess, the daughter of Phanuel, of the tribe of Aser: she was far advanced in years, and had lived with her husband seven years from her virginity. And she was a widow until fourscore and four years: who departed not from the temple, by fastings and prayers serving night and day. Now she at the same hour coming in, gave praise to the Lord: and spoke of him to all that looked for the redemption of Israel. And after they had performed all things according to the law of the Lord, they returned into Galilee, to their own city Nazareth. And the child grew and waxed strong, full of wisdom, and the grace of God was in him.

Haydock Commentary 1 John 2:12-17
Notes Copied From Haydock Commentary Site

  • Ver. 12. I write to you, little children, &c.  S. Aug. and divers others think that by these different words, he only means Christians more or less instructed and advanced in the knowledge and practice of the Christian faith.  Others expound it with a regard also to their different ages and advancement in years.  Wi.
  • Ver. 15. If any man love the world, this wicked world, or any thing in it, as pleasures, riches, honours, so that his affections be more upon these then upon God, the charity of the Father (or of God) is not in him. Wi.
  • Ver. 16-17. All that is in the world, is the concupiscence of the flesh, under which is comprehended all that pleaseth the senses, or the concupiscence of the eyes; i.e. a longing after such things which enter by the eyes, as of riches in gold and silver, in apparel, in houses and palaces, train and equipage, &c. curiosity as to vain arts and sciences; or, the pride of life, as to honours, dignities, and preferments.  But the world passeth away, and all these things that belong to it. He that doth the will of God, abideth for ever, with God in heaven.  Wi.

Haydock Commentary Luke 2:36-40

  • Ver. 36. Anna, a prophetess. She was another witness that Jesus was the Messias, venerable for age, and more for her piety. And had lived with her husband seven years from her virginity; i.e. had been seven years a wife: and from the death of her husband, had remained always a widow: now 84 years of age: who departed not from the temple, but was constantly there at the times of prayer, with fastings and prayers, serving God day and night. Wi.
  • Ver. 40. The child grew, and waxed strong, full of wisdom, and (52) increased in wisdom and age. The Arians from this, pretend to prove that Christ was not truly God, who cannot advance or increase in wisdom.  The true meaning is, that Jesus, as he advanced in age as man, gave greater marks of his divine wisdom, and discovered himself full of knowledge, wisdom, &c.  Wi.

Catena Aurea Luke 2:36-40
From Catechetics Online

  • AMBROSE; Simeon had prophesied, a woman united in marriage had prophesied, a virgin had prophesied, it was meet also that a widow should prophesy, that there might lack no sex or condition of life, and therefore it is said, And there was one Anna a prophetess.
  • THEOPHYL. The Evangelist dwells some time on the account of Anna, mentioning both her father’s tribe, and adding, as it were, many witnesses who knew her father and her tribe.
  • GREG. NYSS. Or because at that time there were several others who were called by the same name, that there might be a plain way of distinguishing her, he mentions her father, and describes the quality of her parents.
  • AMBROSE; Now Anna, both from the duties of her widowhood and her manner of life, is found to be such that she is thought worthy to announce the Redeemer of the world. As it follows, She was of a great age, and had lived with her husband, &c.
  • ORIGEN; For the Holy Spirit dwelt not by chance in her. For the highest blessing, if any can possess it, is the grace of virginity, but if this cannot be, and it chance to a woman to lose her husband, let her remain a widow, which indeed not only after the death of her husband, but even while he is living, she ought to have in her mind, that supposing it should not happen, her will and determination might be crowned by the Lord, and her words should be, “This I vow, and promise, that if a certain condition of this life be mine, (which yet I wish not,) I will do nothing else but remain inviolate and a widow.” Most justly then was this holy woman thought worthy to receive the gift of prophecy, because by long chastity and long fastings she had ascended to this height of virtue, as It follows, Who departed not from the temple with fastings and prayers, &c.
  • ORIGEN; From which it is plain that she possessed a multitude of other virtues, and mark how she resembles Simeon in his goodness, for they were both in the temple together, anti both counted worthy of prophetic grace, as it follows, And she coming in at this very instant, gave thanks to the Lord.
  • THEOPHYL. That is, returned thanks for seeing in Israel the Savior of the world, and she confessed of Jesus that He was the Redeemer and the Savior. Hence it follows, And she spoke of him to all, &c.
  • ORIGEN; But because Anna’s words were nothing remarkable, and of no great note respecting Christ, the Gospel does not give the particulars of what she said, and perhaps for this reason one may suppose that Simeon anticipated her, since he indeed bore the character of the law, (for his name signifies obedience,) but she the character of grace, (which her name is by interpretation,) and Christ came between them. Therefore He let Simeon depart dying with the law, but Anna he sustains living beyond through grace.
  • THEOPHYL; According to the mystical meaning, Anna signifies the Church, who at present is indeed a widow by the death of her Husband ; the number also of the years of her widowhood marks the time of the Church, at which established in the body, she is separated from the Lord. For seven times twelve make eighty-four, seven indeed referring to the course of this world, which revolves in seven days; but twelve had reference to the perfection of Apostolic teaching, and therefore the Universal Church, or any faithful soul which strives to devote the whole period of its life to the following of Apostolic practice, is said to serve the Lord for eighty-four years. The term also of seven years, during which she lived with her husband, coincides. For through the prerogative of our Lord’s greatness, whereby abiding in the flesh, He taught, the simple number of seven years was taken to express the sign of perfection. Anna also favors the mysteries of the Church, being by interpretation its “grace,” and being both the daughter of Phanuel, who is called “the face of God,” and descended from the tribe of Aser, i.e. the blessed.
  • THEOPHYL; Luke has omitted in this place what he knew to have been sufficiently set forth by Matthew, that the Lord after this, for fear that He should be discovered and put to death by Herod, was carried by His parents into Egypt, and at Herod’s death, having at length returned to Galilee, came to dwell in His own city Nazareth. For the Evangelists individually are wont to omit certain things which they either know to have been, or in the Spirit foresee will be, related by others, so that in the connected chain of their narrative, they seem as it were to have omitted nothing, whereas by examining the writings of another Evangelist, the careful reader may discover the places where the omissions have been. Thus after omitting many things, Luke says, And when they had accomplished all things, &c.
  • THEOPHYL. Bethlehem was indeed their city, their paternal city, Nazareth the place of their abode.
  • AUG. Perhaps it may strike you as strange that Matthew should say that His parents went with the young Child into Galilee because they were unwilling to go to Judea for fear of Archelaus, when they seem to have gone into Galilee rather because their city w as Nazareth in Galilee, as Luke in this place explains it. But we must consider, that when the Angel said in a dream to Joseph in Egypt, Rise, and take the young child and his mother, and go into the land of Israel, it was at first understood by Joseph as a command to go into Judea, for so at first sight the land of Israel might have been taken to mean. But when afterwards he finds that Herod’s son Archelaus was king, he was unwilling to be exposed to that danger, seeing the land of Israel might also be understood to include Galilee also as a part of it, for there also the people of Israel dwelt.
  • GREEK EX. Or again, Luke is here describing the time before the descent to Egypt, for before her purification Joseph had not taken Mary there But before they went down into Egypt, they were not told by God to go to Nazareth but as living more freely in their own country, thither of their own accord they went; for since the going up to Bethlehem was for no other reason but the taxing, when that was accomplished they go down to Nazareth.
  • THEOPHYL. Now our Lord might have come forth from the womb in the stature of mature age, but this would seem like something imaginary; therefore His growth is gradual, as it follows, And the child grew, and waxed strong.
  • THEOPHYL; We must observe the distinction of words, that the Lord Jesus Christ in that He w as a child, that is, had put on the condition of human weakness, was daily growing and being strengthened.
  • ATHAN. But if as some say the flesh was changed into a Divine nature, how did it derive growth? for to attribute growth to an uncreated substance is impious.
  • CYRIL; Rightly with the A growth in age, St. Luke has united increase in wisdom, as he says, And he was strengthened, (i.e. in spirit.) For in proportion to the measure of bodily growth, the Divine nature developed its own wisdom.
  • THEOPHYL. For if while yet a little child, He had displayed His wisdom, He would have seemed a miracle, but together with the advance of age He gradually showed Himself, so as to fill the whole world. For not as receiving wisdom is He said to be strengthened in spirit. For that which is most perfect in the beginning, how can that become any more perfect. Hence it follows, Filled with wisdom, and the grace of God was in him.
  • THEOPHYL; Wisdom truly, for in Him dwells all the fullness of the Godhead bodily, but grace, because it was in great grace given to the man Christ Jesus, that from the time He began to be man He should be perfect man and perfect God. But much rather because He was the word of God, and God needed not to be strengthened, nor was in a state of growth. But while He was yet a little child He had the grace of God, that as in Him all things were wonderful, His childhood also might be wonderful, so as to be filled with the wisdom of God. It follows, And his parents went every year to Jerusalem, at the feast of the Passover.
  • CHRYS. At the feast of the Hebrews the law commanded men not, only to observe the time, but the place, and so the Lord’s parents wished to celebrate the feast of the Passover only at Jerusalem.

Daily Scripture Readings Tuesday 5th Day in the Octave of Christmas

December 29 2009 Tuesday The Fifth Day in the Octave of Christmas
Saint of the Day – St. Thomas Becket

About the sources used. The readings on this site are not official for the Mass of Roman Rite of the Catholic Church in the USA, but are from sources free from copyright. They are here to present the comparable readings alongside traditional Catholic commentary as published in the Haydock Bible for your own personal study. Readings vary depending on your local calendar.

Official Readings of the Liturgy at – http://www.usccb.org/nab/readings/122909.shtml

1 John 2:3-11
Haydock New Testament

And in this we know that we have known him, if we keep his commandments. He that saith he knoweth him, and keepeth not his commandments, is a liar, and the truth is not in him. But he that keepeth his word, in him the charity of God is truly perfect: and by this we know that we are in him. He that saith he abideth in him, ought himself also to walk even as he walked.

Dearly beloved, I write not a new commandment to you, but an old commandment, which you have from the beginning: The old commandment is the word which you have heard. Again, a new commandment I write to you, which thing is true both in him, and in you: because the darkness is past, and the true light now shineth. He that saith he is in the light, and hateth his brother, is in darkness even until now. He that loveth his brother, abideth in the light, and there is no scandal in him. But he that hateth his brother, is in darkness, and walketh in darkness, and knoweth not whither he goeth: because the darkness hath blinded his eyes.

Psalm 95:1-6 (Ps 96 Hebrew)
Douay-Rheims Challoner Text Only

Sing ye to the Lord a new canticle: sing to the Lord, all the earth.
Sing ye to the Lord and bless his name: shew forth his salvation from day to day.
Declare his glory among the Gentiles: his wonders among all people.
For the Lord is great, and exceedingly to be praised: he is to be feared above all gods.
For all the gods of the Gentiles are devils: but the Lord made the heavens.
Praise and beauty are before him: holiness and majesty in his sanctuary.

The Gospel According to Saint Luke 2:22-35
Haydock NT

And after the days of her purification, according to the law of Moses, were accomplished, they carried him to Jerusalem, to present him to the Lord, As it is written in the law of the Lord: that every male opening the womb shall be called holy to the Lord. And to offer a sacrifice, according as it is written in the law of the Lord, a pair of turtle-doves, or two young pigeons.

And behold there was a man in Jerusalem named Simeon, and this man was just and devout, waiting for the consolation of Israel, and the Holy Ghost was in him. And he had received an answer from the Holy Ghost, that he should not see death, before he had seen the Christ of the Lord. And he came by the spirit into the temple. And when his parents brought in the child Jesus, to do for him according to the custom of the law; He also took him into his arms, and blessed God, and said:

Now thou dost dismiss thy servant, O Lord, according to thy word, in peace: Because my eyes have seen thy salvation, Which thou hast prepared before the face of all people: A light to the revelation of the Gentiles, and the glory of thy people, Israel.

And his father and mother were wondering at these things which were spoken concerning him. And Simeon blessed them, and said to Mary, his mother:

Behold, this child is set for the ruin, and for the resurrection of many in Israel, and for a sign which shall be contradicted. And thy own soul a sword shall pierce, that out of many hearts thoughts may be revealed.

Haydock Commentary 1 John 2:3-11

  • Ver. 3. We have known him, if we keep his commandments. He speaks of that practical knowledge by love and affection, which can be only proved by our keeping his commandments; and without which we cannot be said to know God, as we should. Ch.
  • Ver. 4. He that says he knoweth him, &c. To know, in this and many other places, is not taken for a speculative knowledge alone, but is joined with a love of God, and an earnest desire of serving him and keeping his commandments. Wi.
  • Ver. 5. The charity of God is truly perfect. Notwithstanding his lesser failings, he retains the habit of charity and grace, by which he remains united to God.—And bythis we know that we are in him; i.e. we are morally, though not absolutely, certain that we are in the state of grace. Wi.
  • Ver. 7-8. An old commandment…. And again, a new commandment. He means the commandment of charity, or of the love of God and the love of our neighbour. This he calls both an old and a new precept. It may be called old, not only as being a precept of the law of nature, and always obligatory, but because S. John and the apostles had delivered it to them long ago, i.e. when these persons were first converted. It may also be called a new precept, S. John recommending it anew to them in this epistle, and declareing it to be enjoined in a particular manner by our Saviour Christ, after it had been misconstrued and neglected, especially as it regards our neighbour, that is, ever one without exception; so that if any one hate another, it is in vain that he pretends to walk in the light of the gospel. Wi.—A new commandment; viz. the commandment of love, which was given in the old law, but was renewed and extended by Christ. See John xiii 33. Ch.

Haydock Commentary Luke 2:22-35

  • Ver. 22. Of her purification. The blessed Virgin mother stood not in need of this ceremony, to which she submitted herself, as her Son did to that of circumcision. Wi.—Whence S. Laur. Justin. In his sermon on the purification, very well observes: grace raise the Virgin above the law; humility subjected her to it. Jesus Christ, in subjecting himself to the law of Moses, has left an example to princes and magistrates, to obey their own laws; for then they may expect them to be observed by others, when themselves shew respect to them. Barradius.
  • Ver. 23. Every male opening the womb. This translation is more conformable to the doctrine of the Fathers, that Christ was born without opening the womb; which Bede calls the doctrine of the Catholic Church. Wi.—See Exod. xiii. 2. and Num. 8:16
  • Ver. 24. This was the offering of the poor classes.
  • Ver. 25. A man… named Simeon, whom some conjecture to have been one of the Jewish priests.—Waiting for the consolation of Israel, for the happy coming of the Messiah.—And the Holy Ghost was in him, by the spirit of grace and of prophecy. Wi.—The consolation here expected by Holy Simeon, was the coming of the Messiah, and the consequent redemption of mankind from sin and the devil; not a redemption only, as some carnal Jews thought, from the power of temporal enemies. These supposed the Messiah was to come in order to raise them in power above all nations, to whom before his coming they had been subject. S. Greg. of Nyssa in Diony.—Many have pretended that Simeon was a priest, the best and oldest interpreters say he was a laic. V.
  • Ver. 26. And he had received an answer, … that he should not see death; i.e. die. Wi.
  • Ver. 27. And he came by the spirit, or moved by the holy Spirit. Wi.
  • Ver. 30. Thy salvation; i.e. the Saviour, whom thou hast sent. Wi.
  • Ver. 31. Before the face of all people; not of Israel only, but also as a light to be revealed to the Gentiles, the spiritual children of Abraham: to whom also the promises were made. Wi.
  • Ver. 33. In the Greek, Joseph and the mother of Jesus. V.
  • Ver. 34. Is set for the ruin. Christ came for the redemption and salvation of all men: but Simeon prophesies what would happen in consequences of the willful blindness and obstinacy of many. Wi.—Not that God sent his Son for the fall of any man; but that many, by their own perverseness, in wilfully refusing to receive and obey him, would take occasion of falling. Ch.—And for a sign which shall be contradicted, to signify that Christ, and his doctrine, should be as it were a mark, or butt, against whom the Jews should discharge the arrows and darts of their malice. Wi.—Hence S. Paul, (2. Cor. ii. 16.) We are to one the odour of death unto death, but to the other the odour of life unto life.
  • Ver. 35. And thy own soul a sword shall pierce. These words, which figuratively express the grief of the blessed Virgin mother, when present at the death of her Son, are to be taken by way of a parenthesis.—That out of many hearts thoughts may be revealed, and these are to be joined with what went before; to wit, that child shall be a sign of contradiction, set unto the fall and resurrection of many, that the thoughts of many hearts may be revealed and disclosed; when some shall believe, and others remain in their obstinacy. Wi.—Bede, and most others, understand this of the sharp sorrow, which wounded the soul of the blessed Virgin Mary, at the time of Christ’s passion. Barradius.—Carthusianus and Jansenius explain this passage as follows: Behold, this child is placed for a sign that shall be contradicted, which as a sword of most poignant grief will pierce thy soul, O Virgin! But Christ shall be contradicted, that the thoughts of the Jews may be revealed from many hearts, and it may appear who among them are good, and who are wicked and hypocrites. Barradius.

Daily Scripture Readings Monday December 28 2009 Feast of the Holy Innocents

December 28 2009 Monday Feast of the Holy Innocents, martyrs
Saint of the Day – Feast of the Holy Innocents

About the sources used. The readings on this site are not official for the Mass of Roman Rite of the Catholic Church in the USA, but are from sources free from copyright. They are here to present the comparable readings alongside traditional Catholic commentary as published in the Haydock Bible for your own personal study. Readings vary depending on your local calendar.

Official Readings of the Liturgy at – http://www.usccb.org/nab/readings/122809.shtml

1 John 1:5—2:2
Haydock New Testament

And this is the declaration which we have heard from him, and declare unto you: That God is light, and in him there is no darkness. If we say that we have fellowship with him, and walk in darkness, we lie, and do not the truth. But if we walk in the light, as he also is in the light, we have fellowship one with another; and the blood of Jesus Christ, his Son, cleanseth us from all sin. If we say that we have no sin: we deceive ourselves, and the truth is not in us. If we confess our sins: he is faithful and just, to forgive us our sins, and to cleanse us from all iniquity. If we say that we have not sinned: we make him a liar, and his word is not in us.

My little children, these things I write to you, that you may not sin.  But if any man sin, we have an advocate with the Father, Jesus Christ the Just: And he is the propitiation for our sins: and not for ours only, but also for those of the whole world.

Responsorial Psalm PS 123:2-3, 4-5, 7cd-8 (Ps 124 NAB)
DR Challoner Text Only

If it had not been that the Lord was with us,
When men rose up against us,
Perhaps they had swallowed us up alive.
When their fury was enkindled against us,
Perhaps the waters had swallowed us up.
Our soul hath passed through a torrent:
perhaps our soul had passed through a water insupportable.
The snare is broken, and we are delivered.
Our help is in the name of the Lord, who made heaven and earth.

The Holy Gospel of Jesus Christ According to Saint Matthew 2:13-18
Haydock New Testament

And when they were departed, behold an angel of the Lord appeared in sleep to Joseph, saying:

Arise, and take the child and his mother, and fly into Egypt, and be there until I shall tell thee.  For it will come to pass that Herod will seek the child to destroy him.

Who, rising up, took the child and his mother by night, and retired into Egypt: And he was there until the death of Herod: that it might be fulfilled which the Lord spoke by the prophet, saying:

Out of Egypt have I called my son.

Then Herod perceiving that he was deluded by the wise men, was exceeding angry, and sending, killed all the men children that were in Bethlehem, and in all the borders thereof, from two years old and under, according to the time which he had diligently inquired of the wise men. Then was fulfilled that which was spoken by Jeremias the prophet, saying:

A voice in Rama was heard, lamentation and great mourning: Rachel bewailing her children, and would not be comforted, because they are not.

Haydock Commentary 1 John 1:5—2:2
Notes Copied From Haydock Commentary Site

  • Ver. 5. God is light,[3] &c.  We cannot have this fellowship with God the Father and his Son Jesus Christ, if we walk in the darkness of sin: we must walk as the children of light.  Wi.
  • Ver. 8. Not that we say or pretend we have no sin;[4] thus truth would not be in us, and we should even make God a liar, who has declared all mankind guilty of sin.  We were all born guilty of original sin; we have fallen, and still frequently fall into lesser sins and failings.  We can only except from this number our Saviour Christ, who, even as man, never sinned, and his blessed Virgin Mother, by a special privilege, preserved from all kind of sin: and of whom S. Aug.[5] says, “that for the honour of our Lord, when we speak of the holy Virgin Mary, he will have no mention at all made of any sin.”  Wi.
  • 1 JOHN 2
  • CHAPTER II.
  • Ver. 1. That you may not sin, or not lose the grace of God by any considerable sin. — But if any man sin, we have an advocate with the Father, Jesus Christ, the eternal Son of the Father, who being made man to redeem us from sin, is our great Advocate, our chief Mediator, and only Redeemer, by whose merits and grace we have been reconciled, after we had lost and forfeited the grace and favour of God by our offences.  He is the only propitiation for the sins of the whole world; for, as S. Paul says, (Heb. x. 14.) Christ, for one oblation on the cross, hath perfected for ever them that are sanctified. All remission of sins, all sanctification, is derived from the merits and satisfaction of our Redeemer, Jesus Christ; not but that the Angels and saints in heaven, and virtuous persons upon earth, when they pray to God for us, may be called advocates, mediators, and intercessors (though not redeemers) in a different sense, and in an inferior manner, without any injury, but on the contrary with an honour done to Christ; because what they pray and ask for us, is only begged and hoped for through Christ, and by his merits.  S. Aug.[1] in his commentary on this epistle, on these very words, we have an advocate, &c. prevents and answers this very objection of the late pretended reformers: (tom. iii, part 2. p. 831. Nov. Edit.) “Some one will say: therefore the saints do not ask for us, therefore the bishops and governors of the Church do not ask for the people.”  He denies that this follows, the saints being advocates in a different sense.  Though God be our protector and defender from dangers, this does not hinder us from owning the Angels to be our defenders in an inferior manner under God, as the Church of England acknowledges in the common prayer book on the feast of S. Michael, and all Angels, which runs thus: “mercifully grant, that as thy holy Angels always do thee service in heaven, so by thy appointment they may succour and defend us on earth through Jesus Christ, our Lord.  Amen.”  Wi. — The calling and office of an advocate is in many things proper to Christ, and in every condition more singularly and excellently applying to him than to any Angel, saint, or living creature, though these also may be truly so called without any derogation from Christ.  To him solely it belongs to procure us mercy before God, by the general ransom of his blood for our delivery; hence he is our only advocate of redemption, though others may be and are advocates of intercession.  Hence S. Irenæus (l. iii. c. 33. et l. v. post med.) says: “the obedient Virgin Mary is made the advocate of the disobedient Eve.”  Our Saviour declares that Angels are deputed for the protection of infants; (Mat. xviii.) and frequent are the examples we find in the old Scripture, such as Gen. xlviii. 16.  Tob v. 27. and xii. 12.  Dan. x.  See also the common prayer book, in the collect of Michaelmas day.

Haydock Commentary Matthew 2:13-18

  • Ver. 14. It is very probable that Joseph, with Jesus and his Mother, remained in some part of Egypt, where the Jews were settled, as at Alexandria.  That many Jews dwelt in Egypt, particularly from the time of the prophet Jeremy, is evident from Josephus, and also from the first chapter of the second book of Machab. Mention is also made of them in Acts ii. and Act. iv. under the name of Alexandrines.
  • Ver. 15. Out of Egypt have I called my son.[3]  S. Jerom understands these words to be taken out of the prophet Osee, (C. xi. 2.) and granted they might be literally spoken of the people of Israel: yet as their captivity in Egypt was a figure of the slavery of sin, under which all mankind groaned, and as their delivery by Moses was a figure of man’s redemption by our Saviour Christ, so these words in a mystical and spiritual sense apply to our Saviour, who in a more proper sense was the Son of God, than was the people of Israel.  Wi. — The application of this passage of the prophet to Christ, whereas in the simple letter it might appear otherwise, teaches us how to interpret the Old Testament; and that the principal sense is of Christ and his Church.  B.
  • Ver. 16. By this example, we learn how great credit we owe to the Church in canonizing saints, and celebrating their holydays: by whose only warrant, without any word of Scripture, these holy Innocents have been honoured as martyrs, and their holyday kept ever since the apostles’ time, although they died not voluntarily, nor all, perhaps, circumcised, and some even children of pagans.  Aug. ep. 28.  Orig. hom. iii. in diversos.  B.
  • Ver. 18. A voice was heard in Rama.[4]  S. Jerom takes Rama, not for the name of any city, but for a high place, as appears by his Latin translation.  Jerem. xxxi. 15.  But in all Greek copies here in S. Matthew, and in the Sept. in Jeremy, we find the word itself Rama, so that it must signify a particular city.  Rachel, who was buried at Bethlehem, is represented weeping (as it were in the person of those desolate mothers) the murder, and loss of so many children: and Rama being a city not far from Bethlehem, in the tribe of Benjamin, built on a high place, it is said that the cries and lamentations of these children, and their mothers, reached even to Rama.  Cornel. a Lapide on Jerem. xxxi. thinks that these words were not only applied by the evangelist in a figurative sense, but that the prophet in the literal sense foretold these lamentations.  Wi.

Sunday Scripture Readings December 27 2009 Feast of the Holy Family of Jesus, Mary and Joseph

December 27 2009 Sunday The Holy Family of Jesus, Mary and Joseph

About the sources used. The readings on this site are not official for the Mass of Roman Rite of the Catholic Church in the USA, but are from sources free from copyright. They are here to present the comparable readings alongside traditional Catholic commentary as published in the Haydock Bible for your own personal study. Readings vary depending on your local calendar.

Official Readings of the Liturgy at – http://www.usccb.org/nab/122709.shtml

All choices the readings are included.

Sirach 3:2-7, 12-14 (Ecclesiasticus)
Douay-Rheims Challoner

Children, hear the judgment of your father, and so do that you may be saved. For God hath made the father honourable to the children: and seeking the judgment of the mothers, hath confirmed it upon the children. He that loveth God, shall obtain pardon for his sins by prayer, and shall refrain himself from them, and shall be heard in the prayer of days. And he that honoureth his mother is as one that layeth up a treasure. He that honoureth his father shall have joy in his own children, and in the day of his prayer he shall be heard. He that honoureth his father shall enjoy a long life: and he that obeyeth the father, shall be a comfort to his mother.

Son, support the old age of thy father, and grieve him not in his life; And if his understanding fail, have patience with him, and despise him not when thou art in thy strength: for the relieving of the father shall not be forgotten. For good shall be repaid to thee for the sin of thy mother. And in justice thou shalt be built up, and in the day of affliction thou shalt be remembered: and thy sins shall melt away as the ice in the fair warm weather.

1 Samuel 1:20-22, 24-28
Douay-Rheims Challoner

And it came to pass when the time was come about, Anna conceived and bore a son, and called his name Samuel: because she had asked him of the Lord. And Elcana, her husband, went up, and all his house, to offer to the Lord the solemn sacrifice, and his vow. But Anna went not up: for she said to her husband:

I will not go till the child be weaned, and till I may carry him, that he may appear before the Lord, and may abide always there.

And after she had weaned him, she carried him with her, with three calves, and three bushels of flour, and a bottle of wine, and she brought him to the house of the Lord in Silo. Now the child was as yet very young: And they immolated a calf, and offered the child to Heli. And Anna said:

I beseech thee, my lord, as thy soul liveth, my lord: I am that woman, who stood before thee here praying to the Lord. For this child did I pray, and the Lord hath granted me my petition, which I asked of him. Therefore I also have lent him to the Lord all the days of his life, he shall be lent to the Lord.

And they adored the Lord there. And Anna prayed.

Psalm 127 Douay-Rheims or 128 NAB
Douay-Rheims Challoner. Text Only

Blessed are all they that fear the Lord: that walk in his ways.
For thou shalt eat the labours of thy hands:
blessed art thou, and it shall be well with thee.
Thy wife as a fruitful vine, on the sides of thy house.
Thy children as olive plants, round about thy table.
Behold, thus shall the man be blessed that feareth the Lord.
May the Lord bless thee out of Sion:
and mayst thou see the good things of Jerusalem all the days of thy life.
And mayst thou see thy children’s children, peace upon Israel.

Psalm 83:2-3, 5-6, 9-10 (Ps 84 NAB)
DR Challoner Text Only

How lovely are thy tabernacles, O Lord of hosts!
my soul longeth and fainteth for the courts of the Lord.
My heart and my flesh have rejoiced in the living God.
Blessed are they that dwell in thy house, O Lord:
they shall praise thee for ever and ever.
Blessed is the man whose help is from thee:
in his heart he hath disposed to ascend by steps,
O Lord God of hosts, hear my prayer: give ear, O God of Jacob.
Behold, O God our protector: and look on the face of thy Christ.

Colossians 3:12-21
Haydock New Testament

Put ye on, therefore, as the elect of God, holy and beloved, the bowels of mercy, benighnity, humility, modesty, patience: Bearing with one another, and forgiving one another, if any of you have a complaint against another: even as the Lord hath forgiven you, so do you also.

But above all these things have charity, which is the bond of perfection: And let the peace of Christ rejoice in your hearts, wherein also you are called in one body: and be ye thankful. Let the word of Christ dwell in you abundantly, in all wisdom, teaching, and admonishing one another in psalms, hymns, and spiritual canticles, singing in grace in your hearts to God. All whatsoever you do in word or in work, do all in the name of the Lord Jesus Christ, giving thanks to God and the Father by him.

Wives, be subject to your husbands, as it behoveth in the Lord. Husbands, love your wives, and be not bitter towards them. Children, obey your parents in all things: for this is pleasing to the Lord. Fathers, provoke not your children to anger, lest they be discouraged.

1 John 3:1-2, 21-24
Haydock New Testament

Behold what manner of charity the Father hath bestowed upon us, that we should be called, and should be the sons of God. Therefore the world knoweth not us, because it hath not known him. Dearly beloved, we are now the sons of God: and it hath not yet appeared what we shall be. We know, that, when he shall appear, we shall be like to him: because we shall see him as he is.

Dearly beloved, if our heart do not reprehend us, we have confidence towards God: And whatsoever we shall ask, we shall receive of him: because we keep his commandments, and do those things that are pleasing in his sight. And this is his commandment: that we should believe in the name of his Son, Jesus Christ: and love one another, as he hath given commandment unto us. And he that keepeth his commandments, abideth in him, and he in him: and in this we know that he abideth in us, by the Spirit which he hath given us.

The Holy Gospel of Jesus Christ According to Saint Luke 2:41-52
Haydock New Testament

And his parents went every year to Jerusalem, at the solemn day of the Pasch. And when he was twelve years old, they went up to Jerusalem, according to the custom of the feast. And after they had fulfilled the days, when they returned, the child, Jesus, remained in Jerusalem, and his parents knew it not. And thinking that he was in the company, they came a day’s journey, and sought him among their kinsfolks and acquaintance. And not finding him, they returned into Jerusalem, seeking him.

And it came to pass, that after three days they found him in the temple, sitting in the midst of the doctors, hearing them, and asking them questions. And all, that heard him, were astonished at his wisdom, and his answers. And seeing him, they wondered. And his mother said to him:

Son, why hast thou done so to us? behold, thy father and I have sought thee, sorrowing.

And he said to them:

How is it that you sought me? did you not know, that I must be about the things that are my Father’s?

And they understood not the word that he spoke unto them. And he went down with them, and came to Nazareth: and was subject to them. And his mother kept all these words in her heart. And Jesus increased in wisdom, and age, and grace with God and men.

Haydock Commentary Sirach (Ecclesiasticus) 3:2-7, 12-14
Notes Copied From Haydock Commentary Site

  • Ver. 3. Seeking. Greek, “and hath confirmed the judgment,” &c. H. — God will revenge any disrespect shewn to parents. M.
  • Ver. 7. Father. Greek, “Lord…mother (8.) and will serve them,” &c. H. — Though you may feed your parents, you are still much in their debt. S. Amb. in Lu. ii. and xviii. Ex. xx. 12. Job iv. 3.
  • Ver. 12. Thee. Boast not of thy superior talents, nor say any thing disrespectful.
  • Ver. 13. A father. Greek, “mother.” Alexander was ashamed of having Philip for his father, pretending that he was the son of Jupiter Ammon. His mother Olympias, with much ingenuity, wrote to him, that he would thus make Juno her powerful rival!

Haydock Commentary 1 Samuel 1:20-22, 24-28

  • Ver. 20. About, at the expiration of the year, which term the ancients frequently allowed between the conception and the nativity. Gen. xviii. 10. — Samuel. This name imports, asked of God. Ch. — Some letters are omitted for the easier pronunciation, as the Hebrews would now write it, Saul-meel; (C.) or it may signigy, “God placed him,” sum-hal. T. — Shaal means, “to ask.” But Vatable thinks that Anna retained only the first letter. M.
  • Ver. 21. Vow, in consequence of his son’s nativity. The sacrifice might be of precept, such as the paschal lamb, or for his wife’s purification and the redemption of his first-born, as they could not attend in person. C. — Heb. “the victim of days and his vow,” which he had probably made in conjunction with Anna. M.
  • Ver. 22. Weaned. The mother of the Machabees weaned her children when they were three years old; (2 Mac. vii. 27.) which Gallien asserts as the proper time, though Avicenna fixes upon two years. See Gen. xxi. 8. Iremellius translates, “till the child be grown up.” But we must not allow any long term, since he was very young when he was presented to the Lord. v. 24.
  • Ver. 24. Three calves. Sept. “a calf three years old,” such as Abraham sacrificed, Gen. xv. 9. We only find one offered up, v. 25. — Bushels. Heb. epha, (C.) each of which contained three bushes or measures. Ruth ii. 17. H. — Bottle. Heb. nebel, a large measure containing above 87 pints. C. — The sacrifices seem to have been for thanksgiving, accompanied with an ephi for each calf, and with wine. Num. xv. Ezec. xlvi. 7.
  • Ver. 26. Liveth: a strong attestation. M. — As sure as you live; or, may you enjoy a long and happy life. See C. xvii. 55. and xx. 3. Dan. iii. 9. 2 Esd. ii. 3.
  • Ver. 28. Lent. This is equivalent to giving entirely. Anna presents her son to the Lord, to serve in his tabernacle as long as God shall think proper. He dispensed with his personal attendance, when he appointed him judge. C. vii. 15. C. — As much as depended on Samuel’s mother, he was consecrated for ever. But he was at liberty to ratify the vow if he pleased. M. — The expression, lent, seems to reserve the dominion of the thing, which Anna had entirely given up, so that we might translate the Heb. “Therefore I have him simply as one lent…he is a thing lent, which belongs to the Lord.” C. — They. Heb. “he worshipped the Lord there.” Grabe found not these words in the Alex. copy, which by comparison of this chapter with the the Vatican edition, appears, to be more accurate. Both omit this sentence: but it is found in the Aldine edition of the Sept. Proleg. C. iv. The Targum adds, “and she prayed in the spirit of prophecy, and said.” H.

Haydock Commentary Colossians 3:12-21

  • Ver. 14. Above all these things have charity, the love of God, and of your neighbour, which is the bond of perfection, the end of all virtues, which unites the hearts of all to God. Wi.
  • Ver. 15. The peace of Christ rejoice:[2] reign, conquer, bear away the prize. Wi.
  • Ver. 16. Employ yourselves in studying and reading the Scriptures; meditating on what our Saviour has done and suffered for you. It is a calumny of our enemies, that we forbid the reading of the Testament. But the Church, fearing lest the faithful should read to their own destruction what was ordained for their salvation, wisely ordains that they should have recourse to their pastors, and receive from them those versions which she approves as most conformable to the Latin Vulgate, which has received the sanction of the holy Catholic Church, and at the same time forbids them those which might corrupt their faith. In this she acts the part of a good and provident mother, conducting her children to the rich and salutary pastures of peace and plenty, and carefully guarding then from others where tempting but noxious weeds luxuriantly grow up, watered with the baneful streams of polluted and poisoned sources.
    If pure be the steams from the fountain,
    As purely the river will flow;
    If noxious the stream from the mountain,
    It poisons the valley below.
  • Ver. 17. Do all in the name of the Lord Jesus Christ. Let all be done for his honour and glory. See 1 Cor. x. 31. Wi.

Haydock Commentary 1 John 3:1-2, 21-24

  • Ver. 1. Behold what manner of charity (or of love) the Father hath bestowed upon us. S. John had said in the last verse of the foregoing chap. that every one who doth justice, is born of him; i.e. is the son of God by adoption. But the world knoweth us not, nor esteems and values us as such: and no wonder, because they have not known, nor acknowledged, nor reverenced God as they ought. We indeed are the sons of God; we believe it, because God has assured us of it; but it hath not yet appeared what we shall be, (v. 2) to what glory or happiness we shall thereby be exalted hereafter, for neither the eye hath seen, nor the ear heard, nor hath it entered into the heart of man, what things God hath prepared for those who love him. 1 Cor. ix. 2. We only know this, that his elect shall be like to him, because they shall see him as he is, when they shall enjoy him in heaven. Wi.
  • Ver. 24. We know that he abideth in us, by the Spirit which he hath given us. These words may be either referred to the body of the Church in general or to the apostles, or to every one in particular. It is certain that God gave his Spirit to his Church and to the apostles, by the coming of the Holy Ghost in a visible manner, and by the miraculous gifts bestowed upon the apostles; but every one in particular has only a moral certainty that he has the Spirit of God, and his sanctifying grace in his soul. Wi.

Haydock Commentary Luke 2:41-52

  • Ver. 41. How can we account for what is related in this verse, that his parents went up every year to Jerusalem, during the childhood of Jesus, when, as we are taught in other parts, his parents did not dare to fix their abode in Jerusalem, for fear of Archelaus: but this, says S. Austin, will not be very difficult to answer; for, it might be easier for them to ascend up to Jerusalem on these particular occasions, without being noticed in so numerous a crowd, and privately return; though it might not be prudent for them to fix their habitation there, lest they might be too much noticed: and, as no one has yet informed us how long Archelaus continued to reign, what S. Luke relates might have taken place after the death of that prince. S. Austin.
  • Ver. 44. It may be asked how the blessed Virgin and S. Joseph could possibly have come so far without missing him; but we must take notice, that when the people went up to the temple from remote parts of Judea, the men went in one company, and the women in a separate company, whilst the children went in either company indifferently: so that S. Joseph imagined that he was with Mary, his mother, whilst she imagined he was with S. Joseph. Nic. de Lyra.
  • Ver. 49. I must be about the things that are my Father’s? By these words he shewed, that not S. Joseph, but only God, was his father. Wi.
  • Ver. 50. They understood not, &c. That is, knew not when, or by what means, Christ designed to make himself known to the world. Wi.
  • Ver. 51. Was subject to them. Astonishing humility! which the Son of God was pleased to teach by his example, as also obedience to parents. Wi. — The evangelist relates nothing of our Saviour from the age of twelve till the age of thirty, except that he was subject to S. Joseph and the blessed Virgin. The divine Spirit shewing by this, that nothing is so great and amiable in Christians, as ready obedience to the directions of their superiors. Barradius. — All children are hereby taught what subjection and obedience is due from them to their parents.
  • Ver. 52. Not that he was wiser at any future period of his life, than he was at the moment of his conception, but this is said, because he chose to manifest increasing signs of wisdom as he increased in years. — In the same manner also he increased in grace, by displaying, as he advanced in age, the gifts of grace with which he was endowed; and by this excited men to the praise of God, from the consideration of favours God had bestowed upon him; and thus he conduced to the honour of God, and the salvation of men. S. Greg. — The sun, always equally brilliant in itself, is said to increase in splendour, till it has reached its meridian brilliancy.

Christmas Scripture Readings Friday December 25 2009 Mass During the Day

December 25 2009 Friday Christmas Mass During the Day
Solemnity of the Nativity of the Lord

About the sources used. The readings on this site are from the Haydock Bible according to the daily Lectionary readings for the American Roman Catholic Church. The Haydock Bible contains traditional Catholic commentary and is free from copyright. Due to verse numbering differences and pastoral deletions in the actual Lectionary, these readings may at times vary from the actual readings.

Official Readings of the Liturgy at – http://www.usccb.org/nab/122509c.shtml

Isaiah 52:7-10
Douay-Rheims Challoner

How beautiful upon the mountains are the feet of him that bringeth good tidings, and that preacheth peace: of him that sheweth forth good, that preacheth salvation, that saith to Sion: Thy God shall reign! The voice of thy watchmen: they have lifted up their voice, they shall praise together: for they shall see eye to eye when the Lord shall convert Sion. Rejoice, and give praise together, O ye deserts of Jerusalem: for the Lord hath comforted his people: he hath redeemed Jerusalem. The Lord hath prepared his holy arm in the sight of all the Gentiles: and all the ends of the earth shall see the salvation of our God.

Psalm 97:1-6 Latin/Greek (98 NAB)
Douay-Rheims Challoner

Sing ye to the Lord a new canticle:
because he hath done wonderful things.
His right hand hath wrought for him salvation, and his arm is holy.
The Lord hath made known his salvation:
he hath revealed his justice in the sight of the Gentiles.
He hath remembered his mercy
and his truth toward the house of Israel.
All the ends of the earth have seen the salvation of our God.
Sing joyfully to God, all the earth;
make melody, rejoice and sing.
Sing praise to the Lord on the harp, on the harp,
and with the voice of a psalm:
With long trumpets, and sound of cornet.
Make a joyful noise before the Lord our king:

Hebrews 1:1-6
Haydock New Testament

God having spoken at different times and in many ways, in times past, to the fathers, by the prophets: last of all, In these days hath spoke to us by his Son, whom he hath appointed heir of all things, by whom also he made the world: Who being the splendour of his glory, and the figure of his substance, and upholding all things by the word of his power, making purgation of sins, sitteth on the right hand of the majesty on high: Being made so much better than the Angels, as he hath inherited a more excellent name than they.

For, to which of the Angels hath he said at any time:

Thou art my Son, this day have I begotten thee?

And again:

I will be to him a Father, and he shall be to me a Son?

And again, when he introduceth the first begotten into the world, he saith:

And let all the Angels of God adore him.

The Gospel According to Saint John 1:1-18
Haydock NT

In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God. The same was in the beginning with God. All things were made by Him: and without Him was made nothing that was made. In Him was life, and the life was the Light of men. And the Light shineth in darkness, and the darkness did not comprehend it.

There was a man sent from God, whose name was John. This man came for a witness, to bear witness of the Light, that all men might believe through Him. He was not the Light, but was to bear witness of the Light. That was the true Light, which enlighteneth every man that cometh into this world. He was in the world, and the world was made by Him, and the world knew Him not. He came unto His own, and His own received Him not. But as many as received Him, He gave to them power to be made the sons of God, to them that believe in His Name. Who are born, not of blood, nor of the will of the flesh, nor of the will of man, but of God.

And the Word was made flesh, and dwelt among us: and we saw His glory, the glory as of the only begotten of the Father, full of grace and truth. John beareth witness of Him: and crieth out, saying: This was He of whom I spoke, He that shall come after me, is preferred before me, because He was before me. And of His fulness we all have received, and grace for grace. For the law was given by Moses, grace and truth came by Jesus Christ. No man hath seen God at any time: the only begotten Son who is in the bosom of the Father, He hath declared Him.

Haydock Commentary Isaiah 52:7-10

  • Ver. 7. Peace. He comes like a conqueror to save his people. It may also be applied to the prophets and apostles, (C.) as S. Paul explains it. Rom. 10:15. M.
  • Ver. 8. Watchmen, prophets. The angels sung at the birth of Christ. Luke 2:14.
  • Ver. 10. Arm. The Saviour. Luke. 1:51.

Haydock Commentary Hebrews 1:1-6

  • Ver. 1. At different times, and in many ways. The first word signifies that God revealed the incarnation of his Son, as it were, by parcels, and by degrees, at different times, and to different persons, to Adam, to Abraham, to Moses, to David, &c. The latter word expresseth the different ways and manners, as by angels, by immediate inspirations, and revelations, by types, figures, and ceremonies.—Last of all, by his Son, his true, natural, eternal Son, of whom we must always take notice, that being both true God, and true man, by the union of the divine and human nature to one and the same divine persons, S. Paul speaks of him sometimes as God, sometimes mentions what applies to him as man, sometimes as our Redeemer, both God and man. This must necessarily happen in speaking of Christ; but when we find things that cannot be understood of one that is a pure or mere man only, or that cannot be true but of him, who is truly God, these are undeniable proofs against the errors of the Arians and Socinians.
  • Ver. 2. Whom he hath appointed heir of all things. Heir is here not taken for one that succeeds another at his death, but for the same as Master or Lord. And though Christ be inseparably God and man, yet this applies to him, as man, because as God, he was not constituted in time, but was always from eternity, Lord of all things, with the Father and the Holy Ghost: by whom also he made the world. That is, all created beings, and in such a manner that all creatures were equally produced by the three divine persons. See. Jo. 1:3 and the annotations on that place. Wi.
  • Ver. 3. Who being the splendour, or brightness of his glory, not as beams or rays are derived from a lightsome body, but by a necessary and eternal communication of the same substance, and of the whole light; in which sense the council of Nice understood the eternal Son of God to be light of light. This partly helps us to conceive the eternal generation of the Son from the Father, because the brightness is at the same time without the sun, though all comparisons fall short of this mystery. Wi.—We may here observe the two natures of Christ. As God, he is the creator of all things; as man, he is constituted heir of the goods of God. Not content to possess the inheritance of his Father in his own person, he will have us as coheirs to share it also with him. May we so live as to hear one day that happy sentence: Come, ye blessed of my Father, &c—And the figure of his substance. In the Greek is the character of his substance; which might be translated, the express image. There are different ways by which a thing may be said to be a figure or image of another: here it is taken for such a representation of the substance of the Father, that though the Father and Son be distinct persons, and the Son proceed from the Father, yet he is such a figure and image, as to have the same nature and substance with the Father, as the Catholic Church always believed and declared against the ancient heretics, and particularly against the Arians. Their words may be partly seen in Petavius, 1. ii. de Trin. c. 11. 1. iv. c. 6. 1. vi. c. 6. being too prolix for these short notes. And this may be understood by the following words concerning the Son: and upholding or preserving all things by the word of his power. As he had said before, that all things were made by him, so all things are preserved by him, equally with the Father. See Col. i. 16, 17. See also v. 10. of this chapter, and the annot. Jo. i. 3. Wi.—Figure. This does not exclude the reality. So Christ’s body in the Eucharist, and his mystical death in the Mass, though called a figure, image, or representation of Christ’s visible body and sacrifice upon the cross, yet may be and is the self-same substance. B.—Sitteth on the right hand of the majesty on High. This also may be taken to express the equality of the Son with the Father, if considered as God; but this sitting on the right hand of God, both here, in S. Mark, c. xvi. and in the apostles’ creed, express what agrees with Christ, as our Redeemer, God made man by his incarnation, and who as man is made the head of his Church, the judge of the living and of the dead; and so S. Stephen said, (Acts vii.) I see the heavens open, and the Son of man standing at the right hand of God. Wi.
  • Ver. 4. Being made so much better, &c. The Arians pretended from hence that Christ was made, or created. But the apostle speaks of Christ as man, and tells us that Christ, even as man, by his ascension was exalted above the Angels.—As he hath inherited a more excellent name. That is, both the dignity and name of the Son of God, of his only Son, and of his true Son. See 1 Jo. v. 20. Wi.
  • Ver. 5. Thou art my Son, this day have I begotten thee. These words, though commonly expounded of the eternal generation of the Son of God in the day or moment of eternity, yet may be truly applied either to Christ made man by his incarnation, or to Christ risen from the dead, as they are used by S. Paul, (Acts xiii. 33.) because the same Christ both these ways is the Son of God. It was the only true and natural Son of God, who was made flesh, who was made man, who rose from the dead; and the eternal Father manifested his eternal Son by his incarnation, and shewed him triumphing over death by his resurrection.—I will be to him a father, &c. Although these words might be literally spoken of Solomon, yet in the mystical sense (chiefly intended by the Holy Ghost) they are to be understood of Christ, who in a much more proper sense is the Son of God. Wi.
  • Ver. 6. Let all the Angels of God adore him. These words seem to be cited out of Ps. xcvi. 7. according to the Sept. And they seem to be an invitation, and a command to the Angels to adore Jesus Christ, when at the end of the world he shall come to judgment. This is one of the proofs which S. Paul here brings, to shew that the Angels are inferior to Christ, because they are commanded to adore him. Wi.—God shews the superiority of his divine Son over the Angels, in ordering the latter to adore him. Wherever the person of Christ is, there it ought to be adored by both men and Angels, therefore in the blessed sacrament.

Haydock Commentary John 1:1-18

  • Ver. 1. In the beginning was the Word: or rather, the Word was in the beginning. The eternal Word, the increated Wisdom, the second Person of the Blessed Trinity, the only begotten Son of the Father, as he is here called (v. 14) of the same nature and substance, and the same God, with the Father and the Holy Ghost. This Word was always; so that it was never true to say, he was not, as the Arians blasphemed. This word was in the beginning. Some, by the beginning, expound the Father himself, in whom he was always. Others give this plain and obvious sense, that the Word, or the Son of God, was, when all other things began to have a being; He never began, but was from all eternity.—And the Word was with God; i.e. was with the Father; and as it is said, (v. 18.) in the bosom of the Father; which implies, that he is indeed a distinct person, but the same in nature and substance with the Father and the Holy Ghost. This is repeated again in the second verse, as repetitions are very frequent in S. John.—And the Word was God. This without question is the construction; where, according to the letter we read, and God was the Word. Wi.—The Greek for the Word signifies not only the exterior Word, but also the interior Word, or thought; and in this latter sense it is taken here. V.—Philo Judæus, in the apostolic age, uses the word to personify the wisdom and the power of God. By a similar metonymy, Jesus Christ is called the Way, the Truth, the Life, the Resurrection.—And the Word was God. Here the eternity and the divinity of the second Person are incontrovertibly established; or, we must say that language has no longer a fixed meaning, and that it is impossible to establish any point whatever from the words of Scripture. A.
  • Ver. 2. The same was in the beginning with God. In the text is only, “this was in the beginning;” but the sense and construction certainly is, this word was in the beginning. Wi.
  • Ver. 3. All things were made by Him, and without Him was made nothing that was made. These words teach us, that all created beings, visible, or invisible on earth, every thing that ever was made, or began to be, were made, produced, and created by this eternal Word, or by the Son of God. The same is truly said of the Holy Ghost; all creatures being equally produced, created, and preserved by the three Divine Persons as, by their proper, principal, and efficient cause, in the same manner, and by the same action: not by the Son, in any manner inferior to the Father; nor as if the Son produced things only ministerially, and acted only as the minister, and instrument of the Father, as the Arians pretended. In this sublime mystery of one God and three distinct Persons, if we consider the eternal processions, and personal proprieties, the Father is the first Person, but not by any priority of time, or of dignity; all the three divine Persons being eternal, or co-eternal, equal in all perfections, being one in nature, in substance, in power, in majesty: in a word, one and the same God. The Father in no other sense is called the first Person, but because he proceeds from none, or from no other person: and the eternal Son is the second Person begotten, and proceeding from him, the Father, from all eternity, proceeds now, and shall proceed from him for all eternity; as we believe that the third divine Person, the Holy Ghost, always proceeded without any beginning, doth now proceed, and shall proceed for ever, both from the Father and the Son. But when we consider and speak of any creatures, of any thing that was made, or had a beginning, all things were equally created in time, and are equally preserved, no less by the Son, and by the Holy Ghost, than by the Father. For which reason S. John tells us again in this chapter, (v. 10) that the world was made by the Word. And our Saviour Himself (jo. v. 19) tells us, that whatsoever the Father doth, these things also in like manner, or in the same manner, the Son doth. Again the apostle, (Heb. i. v. 2) speaking of the Son, says, the world was made by him: and in the same chapter, (v. 10.) he applies to the Son these words, (Ps. ci:26) And thou, O Lord, in the beginning didst found the earth: and the heavens are the works of thy hands, &c. TO omit other places, S. Paul again, writing to the Colossians, (C. i. v. 16. 17.) and speaking of God’s beloved Son, as may be seen in that chapter, says, that in him all things were created, visible and invisible—all things were created in Him, and by Him, or, as it is in the Greek, unto Him, and for Him; to shew that the Son was not only the efficient cause, the Maker and Creator of all things, but also the last end of all. Which is also confirmed by the following words: And he is before all, and all things subsist in him, or consist in him; as in the Rheims and Protestant translations (KJV?). I have, therefore, in this third verse, translated all things were made by Him, with all English translations and paraphrases, whether made by Catholics or Protestants; and not all things were made through him, lest through should seem to carry with it a different and a diminishing signification; or as if, in the creation of the world, the eternal word, or the Son of God, produced things only ministerially, and in a manner, inferior to the Father, as the Arians and Eunomians pretended; against whom, on this very account, wrote S. Basil, lib. de spiritu Sto. S. Chrysostom, and S. Cyril, on this very verse; where they expressly undertake to shew that the Greek text in this verse no ways favours these heretics. The Arians, and now the Socinians, who deny the Son to be true God, or that the word God applies as properly to him as to the Father, but would have him called God, that is, a nominal god, in an inferior and improper sense; as when Moses is called the god of Pharao; (Exod. vii. 1) or as men in authority are called gods; (Ps. lxxxi. 6.) pretend, after Origen, to find another difference in the Greek text; as if, when mention is made of the Father, he is styled the God; but that the Son os only called God, or a God. This objection S. Chrysostom, S. Cyril, and others, have shewn to be groundless: that pretended significant Greek article being several times omitted, when the word God is applied to God the Father; and being found in other places, when the Son of God is called God. See this objection fully and clearly answered by the author of a short book, published in the year 1729, against Dr. Clark and Mr. Whiston, P. 64. and seq. Wi.—Were made, &c. Mauduit here represents the word: —“1. As a cause, or principle, acting extraneously from himself upon the void space, in order to give a being to all creatures:” whereas there was no void space before the creation. Anti omnia Deus erat solus, ipse sibi et mundus et locus, et omnia. Tert. 1. cont. Prax. c. v. And S. Aug. in Ps. cxxii. Says: antequam faceret Deus Sanctos, ubi habitabat In se habitabat, apud se habitabat.—The creation of all things, visible and invisible, was the work of the whole blessed Trinity; but the Scriptures generally attributes of the Son, are displayed most in it. Calmet.—What wonderful tergiversations the Arians used to avoid the evidence of this text, we see in S. Austin, 1. iii. de doct. Christ. c. 2; even such as modern dissenters do, to avoid the evidence of This is my Body, concerning the Blessed Eucharist. B.
  • Ver. 4. In Him: i.e. in this Word, or Son of God, was life; because he gives life to every living creature. Or, as Maldonatus expounds it, because he is the author of grace, which is the spiritual life of our souls.—And the life was the light of men, whether we expound it of a rational soul and understanding, which he gives to all men; or of the spiritual life, and those lights of graces, which he gives to Christians. Wi.
  • Ver. 5. And the light shineth, or did shine, in darkness. Many understand this, that the light of reason, which God gave to every one, might have brought them to the knowledge of God by the visible effects of his Providence in this world: but the darkness did not comprehend it, because men, blinded by their passions, would not attend to the light of reason. Or we may again understand it, with Maldonatus, of the lights of grace, against which obstinate sinners willfully shut their eyes. Wi.
  • Ver. 7. That all men might believe through him; i.e. by John’s preaching, who was God’s instrument to induce them to believe in Jesus the Christ, or the Messiah, their only Redeemer. Wi.
  • Ver. 8-9. He; that is, John, was not the true light: but the Word was the true light. In the translation, it is necessary to express that the Word was the true light, lest any one should think that John the Baptist was this light. Wi.
  • Ver. 10. He was in the world, &c. Many of the ancient interpreters understand dthis verse of Christ as God, who was in the world from its first creation, producing and governing all things: but the blind sinful world did not know and worship him. Others apply these words to the Son of God made man; whom even God’s own chosen people, the Jews, at his coming, refused to receive and believe in him. Wi.
  • Ver. 11. His own. This regards principally the Jews. Jesus came to them as into his own family, but they did not receive him. It may likewise be extended to the Gentiles, who had groaned so long a time in darkness, and only seemed to wait for the rising sun of justice to run to its light. They likewise did not receive him. These words, through apparently general, must be understood with restriction; as there were some, through comparatively few, of both Jews and Gentiles, who embraced the faith. Calmet.
  • Ver. 12. He gave to the power to be made the adoptive sons of God, and heirs of the kingdom of heaven. They are made the children of God by believing, and by a new spiritual birth in the sacrament of baptism, not of blood; (literally, not of bloods) not by the will, and desires of the flesh, not by the will of men, nor by human generation, as children are first born of their natural parents, but of God, by faith and divine grace. Wi.
  • Ver. 14. And the Word was made flesh. This Word, or Son of God, who was in the beginning, from all eternity, at the time appointed by the divine decrees, was made flesh, i.e. became man, by a true and physical union of his divine person, (from which the divine nature was inseparable) to our human nature, to a human soul, and a human body, in the womb, and of the substance, of his Virgin Mother. From the moment of Christ’s incarnation, as all Christians are taught to believe, he that was God from eternity, became also truly man. In Jesus Christ, our blessed Redeemer, we believe one divine Person with two natures, and two wills; the one divine, the other human: by which substantial union, one and the same Person became truly both God and man; not two persons, or two sons, as Nestorius, the heretic, pretended. By this union, and a mutual communication of the proprieties of each nature, it is true to say, that the Son of God, remaining unchangeably God, was made man; and therefore that God was truly conceived and born of the Virgin Mary, who, on this account, was truly the Mother of God: that God was born, suffered, and died on the cross, to redeem and save us. The Word, in this manner made man, dwelt in us, or among us, by this substantial union with our human nature, not morally only, nor after such a manner, as God is said to dwell in a temple; nor as he is in his faithful servants, by a spiritual union, and communication of his divine graces; but by such a real union, that the same person is truly both God and man.—And we saw his glory, manifested to the world by many signs and miracles; we in particular, who were present at his transfiguration. Matt. xvii.—Full of grace and truth. These words, in the construction, are to be joined in this manner: the Word dwelt in us, full of grace and truth; and we have seen his glory, &c. This fulness of grace in Christ Jesus, infinitely surpassed the limited fulness, which the Scripture attributes to S. Stephen (Acts vi. or to the Blessed Virgin Mother: (Lk 1:28) they are said to be full of grace, only because of an extraordinary communication and greater share of graces than was given to other saints. But Christ, even as man, had a greater abundance of divine graces: and being truly God as well as man, his grace and sanctity were infinite, as was his person.—As of the only begotten of the Father. If we consider Christ in himself, and not only as he was made known to men by outward signs and miracles, S. Chrysostom and others take notice that the word as, no ways diminisheth the signification; and that the sense is, we have seen the glory of him, who is truly from all eternity the only begotten Son of the Father: who, as the Scriptures assure us, is his true, his proper Son, his only begotten, who was sent into the world, who descended from heaven, and came from the Father, and leaving the world, returned where he was before, returned to his Father. We shall meet with many such Scripture texts, to shew him to be the eternal Son of his eternal Father; or to shew that the Father was always his Father, and the Son always his Son: as it was the constant doctrine of the Catholic Church, and as such declared in the general council of Nice (Nicaea), that this, his only Son, was born or begotten of the Father before all ages… God from God, the true God from the true God. It was by denying this truth, “that the Son was the Son always, and the Father always, and from all eternity, the Father;” that the blaspheming Arius began his heresy in his letter to Eusebius of Nicomedia, against his bishop of Alexandria, S. Alexander. See the letter copied by S. Epiphan. Hær. 69. p. 731. Ed. Petavii. Wi.—Dwelt among us. In a material body, like ours, clothe with our nature. He is become mortal, and like us in every thing, but sin and concupiscence. The Greek, literally translated, is, he has pitched his tent amongst us, like a stranger and passenger, who makes no long stay in one place. The body in Scripture, is sometimes called a tent or tabernacle, in which the soul dwells, as 2. Peter. 1:14. Calmet.
  • Ver. 15. Is preferred before me. Lit. is made before me. The sense, says S. Chrys. is, that he is greater in dignity, deserves greater honour, &c. through born after me, he was from eternity. Wi.
  • Ver. 16. And of his fulness we all have received; not only Jews, but also all nations.—And grace for grace. It may perhaps be translated grace upon grace, as Mr. Blackwell observes, and brings a parallel example in Greek out of Theognis, p. 164. It implies abundance of graces, and greater graces under the new law of Christ than in the time of the law of Moses; which exposition is confirmed by the following verse. Wi.—Before the coming of the Messiah all men had the light of reason. The Greeks had their philosophy, the Jews the law and prophets. All this was a grace and favour bestowed by God, the author of all good. But since the word was made flesh, God has made a new distribution of graces. He has given the light of faith, and caused the gospel of salvation to be announced to all men; he has invited all nations to the faith and knowledge of the truth. Thus he has given us one grace for another; but the second is infinitely greater, more excellent, and more abundant than the first. The following verse seems to insinuate, that the evangelist means the law by the first grace, and the gospel by the second. Compare likewise Rom. i. 17. The Jews were conducted by faith to faith; by faith in God and the law of Moses, to the faith of the gospel, announced by Christ. Calmet.
  • Ver. 18. No man hath seen God. No mortal in this life by a perfect union and enjoyment of him. Nor can any creature perfectly comprehend his infinite greatness: non but his only begotten divine Son, who is in the bosom of his Father, not only by an union of grace, but by an union and unity of substance and nature; of which Christ said, (Jo. xiv. 11) I am in the Father, and the Father in me. Wi.