Sunday Scripture Readings September 26 2010 26th Sunday in Ordinary Time

September 26 2010 Twenty Sixth Sunday in Ordinary Time
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Amos 6:1a,4-7
Douay-Rheims Challoner

Woe to you that are wealthy in Sion; You that sleep upon beds of ivory, and are wanton on your couches: that eat the lambs out of the flock, and the calves out of the midst of the herd; You that sing to the sound of the psaltery: they have thought themselves to have instruments of music like David; That drink wine in bowls, and anoint themselves with the best ointments: and they are not concerned for the affliction of Joseph.

Wherefore now they shall go captive at the head of them that go into captivity: and the faction of the luxurious ones shall be taken away.

Responsorial Psalm 145:7, 8-9, 9-10 (Ps 146 NAB)
DR Challoner Text Only

Blessed is he
Who keepeth truth for ever:
who executeth judgment for them that suffer wrong:
who giveth food to the hungry.
The Lord looseth them that are fettered:

The Lord enlighteneth the blind.
The Lord lifteth up them that are cast down:
the Lord loveth the just.

The Lord keepeth the strangers,
he will support the fatherless and the widow:
and the ways of sinners he will destroy.

The Lord shall reign for ever:
thy God, O Sion, unto generation and generation.

1 Timothy 6:11-16
Haydock New Testament

But thou, O man of God, fly these things: and pursue justice, piety, faith, charity, patience, meekness. Fight the good fight of faith, lay hold on eternal life whereunto thou art called, and hast confessed a good confession before many witnesses.

I charge thee before God, who quickeneth all things, and before Christ Jesus, who gave testimony under Pontius Pilate, a good confession: That thou keep the commandment without spot, blameless, unto the coming of our Lord Jesus Christ: Which in his times he shall shew, who is the Blessed and only Mighy, the King of kings, and Lord of lords: Who only hath immortality, and inhabiteth light inaccessible, whom no man hath seen, nor can see: to whom be honour and empire everlasting. Amen.

The Holy Gospel of Jesus Christ According to Saint Luke 16:19-31
Haydock New Testament

There was a certain rich man, who was clothed in purple and fine linen: and feasted sumptuously every day. And there was a certain beggar, by name Lazarus, who lay at his gate, full of sores, Desiring to be filled with the crumbs that fell from the rich man’s table; and no one did give him: moreover, the dogs came and licked his sores.

And it came to pass that the beggar died, and he was carried by the Angels into Abraham’s bosom. And the rich man also died: and he was buried in hell. And lifting up his eyes when he was in torments, he saw Abraham afar off, and Lazarus in his bosom: And he cried, and said:

Father Abraham, have mercy on me, and send Lazarus, that he may dip the tip of his finger in water, to cool my tongue, for I am tormented in this flame.

And Abraham said to him:

Son, remember that thou didst receive good things in thy life-time, and likewise Lazarus evil things: but now he is comforted, and thou art tormented. And besides all this, between us and you there is fixed a great chaos: so that they who would pass from hence to you, cannot, nor from thence come hither.

And he said:

Then, Father, I beseech thee that thou wouldst send him to my father’s house: For I have five brethren, that he may testify to them, lest they also come into this place of torments.

And Abraham said to him:

They have Moses and the prophets; let them hear them.

But he said:

No, father Abraham; but if one went to them from the dead, they will do penance.

And he said to him:

If they hear not Moses and the prophets, neither will they believe if one rise again from the dead.

Haydock Commentary Amos 6:1a,4-7

  • Ver. 1. Wealthy. Sept. Syr. and Arab. “despisers of Sion.” Heb. also, “who hate Sion.” The prophecy wholly regards Israel. C.—It is a great crime for the rich to neglect the poor; but still more so, when wealthy clergymen shew no compassion for the spiritual or corporal wants of their neighbours. W.—State. Heb. “to whom the house of Israel comes” for judgment.
  • Ver. 4. Ivory, with which the beds for eating were adorned. v. 7. C.—Wanton. Heb. “stretch themselves out upon their,” &c. H.
  • Ver. 5. David. They think they excel him in music; but he consecrated his talent to a better purpose. C.—Sept. “they deemed them stable, and not fugitive things.” H.—They have placed their chief good in such pleasures. Theod. C.
  • Ver. 6. In bowls. Sept. “refined,” (H.) or cleared of the dregs.—Joseph, of their brethren, or they seem to have no share in the sufferings of mankind. Ps. lxxii. 5.
  • Ver. 7. Luxurious. Heb. “the feast of those who stretch themselves out, shall,” &c. Sept. “the neighing shall be removed from Ephraim.” His luste shall be punished. Jer. v. 8.—Some translate Heb. “the mourning of those who stretch themselves on their beds is at hand.” Others, “their funeral feast is distant.” None shall bewail their death. So ambiguous is the original. C.

Haydock Commentary 1 Timothy 6:11-16

  • Ver. 11. But thou, O man of God. This, says S. Chrys. is one of the highest titles and commendations that can be given to any man. So are called Samuel, Elias, Eliseus. 1 K. ii. and ix. 3 K. xxxiii. Wi.
  • Ver. 12. Fight the good fight. Lit. strive a good strife. S. Paul oftentimes brings this comparison of men striving for a prize.—And hast confessed a good confession before many witnesses, not only when baptized, not only when thou wast ordained a bishop, but by thy constancy and sufferings, and persecutions, says S. Chrys. though we know not the particulars. Wi.—Timothy had made profession of his faith at his baptism, at his ordination, and during the whole course of a life which, through many labours and persecutions, had been dedicated entirely to promote the faith. D. Thomas.—Like him let us also combat, if we aspire after the same triumph and prize.
  • Ver. 13. Under Pontius Pilate, &c. Some expound it of the words and particular testimony Christ gave when he said he was king, but not of this world, who came to teach the truth. We may rather understand it with others, of all Christ taught and suffered under Pilate, or whilst he was governor of Judea. Wi.
  • Ver. 14. That thou keep the commandment. Some understand that of fighting manfully; others of loving God; others rather comprehend all that S. Paul had commanded him, and all the instructions given.—Unto the coming of our Lord; which coming, he in due time will shew. This is the construction by the Greek. Wi.00This coming will be desirable for Christians who have preserved or recovered their baptismal innocence, and for pastors who have faithfully fulfilled their ministry; but terrible, in the extreme, for all who have lived in the constant neglect and omission of their duties.
  • Ver. 16. Who only hath immortality; i.e. is immortal of himself, and by his own nature.—Light inaccessible;

to human eyes or understandings. Wi.

Haydock Commentary Luke 16:19-31

  • Ver. 19. There was a certain rich man, &c. By this history of the rich man and Lazarus, he declares that those who are placed in affluent circumstances, draw upon themselves a sentence of condemnation, if seeing their neighbor in want, they neglect to succour him. S. Cyril, in Cat. Graec. Partum.—He that hath the substance of this world, and shall see his brother in need, and shut up his bowels against him, how doth the charity of God abide in him? John, 1 Ep. iii. 17. A received tradition of the Jews informs us, that this Lazarus was a beggar, then at Jerusalem, suffering in the most wretched condition of poverty, and infirmity: him our Saviour introduces, to manifest more plainly the truth of what he had been saying. S. Cyril, ut supra.—By this, we are not to understand that all poverty is holy, and the possession of riches criminal; but, as luxury is the disgrace of riches, so holiness of life is the ornament of poverty. S. Ambrose.—A man may be reserved and modest in the midst of riches and honours, as he may e proud and avaricious in the obscurity of a poor and wretched life.—Divers interpreters have looked upon this as a true history; but what is said of the rich man seeing Lazarus, of his tongue, or his finger, cannot be literal: souls having no such parts. Wi.—In this parable, which S. Ambrose takes to be a real fact, we have the name of the poor mendicant; but our Lord suppresses the name of the rich man, to signify that his name is blotted out of the book of life: besides, the rich man tells Abraham, that he has five brothers, who were probably still living; wherefore, to save their honour, our Lord named not their reprobated brother.
  • Ver. 22. Abraham’s bosom. The place of rest, where the souls of the saints resided, till Christ had opened heaven by his death. Ch.—It was an ancient tradition of the Jews, that the souls of the just were conducted by angels into paradise. The bosom of Abraham (the common Father of all the faithful) was the place where the souls of the saints, and departed patriarchs, waited the arrival of their Deliverer. It was thither that Jesus went after his death; as it is said in the Creed, “he descended into hell,” to deliver those who were detained there, and who might at Christs’s ascension enter into heaven. Calmet. See 1 Pet. iii. 19.—“Many shall come from the east and the west, and shall sit down with Abraham.” Matt. viii. 11.
  • Ver. 25. It appears from Philo, (de Execrat. p. 9, 37 b.) that the Jews not only acknowledged the existence of souls, and their state of happiness or misery after this life, but also that the souls of the saints and patriarchs interceded with God for their descendants, and obtained for them the succour they stood in need of. Calmet.
  • Ver. 26. Between us and you is fixed a great chaos, or gulf; i.e. God’s justice has decreed, that the bad should forever be separated from the good. We may here take notice that the Latin and Greek word, (v. 22) translated hell, even in the Prot. translation, cannot signify only the grave. Wi.
  • Ver. 27. If they hear not Moses, &c. We think that if we saw a man raised from the dead, who should tell us what he had seen and suffered in another world, it would make more impression upon us than past miracles, which we hear of, or the promises and threats of the prophets, apostles, and our blessed Saviour, which are contained in the Scripture; but it is a false notion, a vain excuse. The wicked, and unbelievers, would even in that case find pretexts and objections for not believing. S. Chrys. hom. iv.—They would say that the dead man was a phantom; that his resurrection was not real; his assertion nugatory. When Christ raised Lazarus from the dead, the miracle was known, evident and public, yet we find none of the Pharisees converted by it. They were even so mad as to enter into a design to kill Lazarus, to get rid of a witness who deposed against their incredulity. How many other miracles did he not perform in their sight, which they attributed to the prince of darkness, or to magic? Christ raised himself from the dead. This fact was attested by many unexceptionable witnesses. And what do the hardened Jews do? They object, that his disciples, stealing away the body, maliciously persuaded the people that he had risen again. Such is the corruption of the human heart, that when once delivered up to any passion, nothing can movie it. Every day we see or hear of malefactors publicly executed yet their example has no effect on the survivors, nor does it prevent the commissions of fresh crimes. Calmet.—“We have also the more firm prophetical word; whereunto you do well to attend, as to a light that shineth in a dark place, until the day dawn, and the day-star arise in your hearts.” 2 Pet. i. 19.—We may learn many very instructive lessons from this affecting history of Lazarus.—The rich may learn the dreadful consequences to be apprehended from riches, when made subservient to sensuality, luxury, and ambition. The poor may learn to make their poverty and sufferings however grievous the nature, instrumental to their future happiness, by bearing them with patience and resignation and resignation to the will of heaven. The former are taught that to expose a man to eternal misery, nothing more is required than to enjoy all the good things of this world according to their own will; the latter that however they may be despised and rejected of men, they may still have courage, knowing that the short day of this fleeting life, with all its apparent evils will soon be over; and that the day of eternity is fast approaching, when everyone shall receive according as he has done good or evil in his body.
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