Sunday Scripture Readings September 26 2010 26th Sunday in Ordinary Time

September 26 2010 Twenty Sixth Sunday in Ordinary Time
Disclaimer – Official Readings of the Liturgy at – http://www.usccb.org/nab/

Amos 6:1a,4-7
Douay-Rheims Challoner

Woe to you that are wealthy in Sion; You that sleep upon beds of ivory, and are wanton on your couches: that eat the lambs out of the flock, and the calves out of the midst of the herd; You that sing to the sound of the psaltery: they have thought themselves to have instruments of music like David; That drink wine in bowls, and anoint themselves with the best ointments: and they are not concerned for the affliction of Joseph.

Wherefore now they shall go captive at the head of them that go into captivity: and the faction of the luxurious ones shall be taken away.

Responsorial Psalm 145:7, 8-9, 9-10 (Ps 146 NAB)
DR Challoner Text Only

Blessed is he
Who keepeth truth for ever:
who executeth judgment for them that suffer wrong:
who giveth food to the hungry.
The Lord looseth them that are fettered:

The Lord enlighteneth the blind.
The Lord lifteth up them that are cast down:
the Lord loveth the just.

The Lord keepeth the strangers,
he will support the fatherless and the widow:
and the ways of sinners he will destroy.

The Lord shall reign for ever:
thy God, O Sion, unto generation and generation.

1 Timothy 6:11-16
Haydock New Testament

But thou, O man of God, fly these things: and pursue justice, piety, faith, charity, patience, meekness. Fight the good fight of faith, lay hold on eternal life whereunto thou art called, and hast confessed a good confession before many witnesses.

I charge thee before God, who quickeneth all things, and before Christ Jesus, who gave testimony under Pontius Pilate, a good confession: That thou keep the commandment without spot, blameless, unto the coming of our Lord Jesus Christ: Which in his times he shall shew, who is the Blessed and only Mighy, the King of kings, and Lord of lords: Who only hath immortality, and inhabiteth light inaccessible, whom no man hath seen, nor can see: to whom be honour and empire everlasting. Amen.

The Holy Gospel of Jesus Christ According to Saint Luke 16:19-31
Haydock New Testament

There was a certain rich man, who was clothed in purple and fine linen: and feasted sumptuously every day. And there was a certain beggar, by name Lazarus, who lay at his gate, full of sores, Desiring to be filled with the crumbs that fell from the rich man’s table; and no one did give him: moreover, the dogs came and licked his sores.

And it came to pass that the beggar died, and he was carried by the Angels into Abraham’s bosom. And the rich man also died: and he was buried in hell. And lifting up his eyes when he was in torments, he saw Abraham afar off, and Lazarus in his bosom: And he cried, and said:

Father Abraham, have mercy on me, and send Lazarus, that he may dip the tip of his finger in water, to cool my tongue, for I am tormented in this flame.

And Abraham said to him:

Son, remember that thou didst receive good things in thy life-time, and likewise Lazarus evil things: but now he is comforted, and thou art tormented. And besides all this, between us and you there is fixed a great chaos: so that they who would pass from hence to you, cannot, nor from thence come hither.

And he said:

Then, Father, I beseech thee that thou wouldst send him to my father’s house: For I have five brethren, that he may testify to them, lest they also come into this place of torments.

And Abraham said to him:

They have Moses and the prophets; let them hear them.

But he said:

No, father Abraham; but if one went to them from the dead, they will do penance.

And he said to him:

If they hear not Moses and the prophets, neither will they believe if one rise again from the dead.

Haydock Commentary Amos 6:1a,4-7

  • Ver. 1. Wealthy. Sept. Syr. and Arab. “despisers of Sion.” Heb. also, “who hate Sion.” The prophecy wholly regards Israel. C.—It is a great crime for the rich to neglect the poor; but still more so, when wealthy clergymen shew no compassion for the spiritual or corporal wants of their neighbours. W.—State. Heb. “to whom the house of Israel comes” for judgment.
  • Ver. 4. Ivory, with which the beds for eating were adorned. v. 7. C.—Wanton. Heb. “stretch themselves out upon their,” &c. H.
  • Ver. 5. David. They think they excel him in music; but he consecrated his talent to a better purpose. C.—Sept. “they deemed them stable, and not fugitive things.” H.—They have placed their chief good in such pleasures. Theod. C.
  • Ver. 6. In bowls. Sept. “refined,” (H.) or cleared of the dregs.—Joseph, of their brethren, or they seem to have no share in the sufferings of mankind. Ps. lxxii. 5.
  • Ver. 7. Luxurious. Heb. “the feast of those who stretch themselves out, shall,” &c. Sept. “the neighing shall be removed from Ephraim.” His luste shall be punished. Jer. v. 8.—Some translate Heb. “the mourning of those who stretch themselves on their beds is at hand.” Others, “their funeral feast is distant.” None shall bewail their death. So ambiguous is the original. C.

Haydock Commentary 1 Timothy 6:11-16

  • Ver. 11. But thou, O man of God. This, says S. Chrys. is one of the highest titles and commendations that can be given to any man. So are called Samuel, Elias, Eliseus. 1 K. ii. and ix. 3 K. xxxiii. Wi.
  • Ver. 12. Fight the good fight. Lit. strive a good strife. S. Paul oftentimes brings this comparison of men striving for a prize.—And hast confessed a good confession before many witnesses, not only when baptized, not only when thou wast ordained a bishop, but by thy constancy and sufferings, and persecutions, says S. Chrys. though we know not the particulars. Wi.—Timothy had made profession of his faith at his baptism, at his ordination, and during the whole course of a life which, through many labours and persecutions, had been dedicated entirely to promote the faith. D. Thomas.—Like him let us also combat, if we aspire after the same triumph and prize.
  • Ver. 13. Under Pontius Pilate, &c. Some expound it of the words and particular testimony Christ gave when he said he was king, but not of this world, who came to teach the truth. We may rather understand it with others, of all Christ taught and suffered under Pilate, or whilst he was governor of Judea. Wi.
  • Ver. 14. That thou keep the commandment. Some understand that of fighting manfully; others of loving God; others rather comprehend all that S. Paul had commanded him, and all the instructions given.—Unto the coming of our Lord; which coming, he in due time will shew. This is the construction by the Greek. Wi.00This coming will be desirable for Christians who have preserved or recovered their baptismal innocence, and for pastors who have faithfully fulfilled their ministry; but terrible, in the extreme, for all who have lived in the constant neglect and omission of their duties.
  • Ver. 16. Who only hath immortality; i.e. is immortal of himself, and by his own nature.—Light inaccessible;

to human eyes or understandings. Wi.

Haydock Commentary Luke 16:19-31

  • Ver. 19. There was a certain rich man, &c. By this history of the rich man and Lazarus, he declares that those who are placed in affluent circumstances, draw upon themselves a sentence of condemnation, if seeing their neighbor in want, they neglect to succour him. S. Cyril, in Cat. Graec. Partum.—He that hath the substance of this world, and shall see his brother in need, and shut up his bowels against him, how doth the charity of God abide in him? John, 1 Ep. iii. 17. A received tradition of the Jews informs us, that this Lazarus was a beggar, then at Jerusalem, suffering in the most wretched condition of poverty, and infirmity: him our Saviour introduces, to manifest more plainly the truth of what he had been saying. S. Cyril, ut supra.—By this, we are not to understand that all poverty is holy, and the possession of riches criminal; but, as luxury is the disgrace of riches, so holiness of life is the ornament of poverty. S. Ambrose.—A man may be reserved and modest in the midst of riches and honours, as he may e proud and avaricious in the obscurity of a poor and wretched life.—Divers interpreters have looked upon this as a true history; but what is said of the rich man seeing Lazarus, of his tongue, or his finger, cannot be literal: souls having no such parts. Wi.—In this parable, which S. Ambrose takes to be a real fact, we have the name of the poor mendicant; but our Lord suppresses the name of the rich man, to signify that his name is blotted out of the book of life: besides, the rich man tells Abraham, that he has five brothers, who were probably still living; wherefore, to save their honour, our Lord named not their reprobated brother.
  • Ver. 22. Abraham’s bosom. The place of rest, where the souls of the saints resided, till Christ had opened heaven by his death. Ch.—It was an ancient tradition of the Jews, that the souls of the just were conducted by angels into paradise. The bosom of Abraham (the common Father of all the faithful) was the place where the souls of the saints, and departed patriarchs, waited the arrival of their Deliverer. It was thither that Jesus went after his death; as it is said in the Creed, “he descended into hell,” to deliver those who were detained there, and who might at Christs’s ascension enter into heaven. Calmet. See 1 Pet. iii. 19.—“Many shall come from the east and the west, and shall sit down with Abraham.” Matt. viii. 11.
  • Ver. 25. It appears from Philo, (de Execrat. p. 9, 37 b.) that the Jews not only acknowledged the existence of souls, and their state of happiness or misery after this life, but also that the souls of the saints and patriarchs interceded with God for their descendants, and obtained for them the succour they stood in need of. Calmet.
  • Ver. 26. Between us and you is fixed a great chaos, or gulf; i.e. God’s justice has decreed, that the bad should forever be separated from the good. We may here take notice that the Latin and Greek word, (v. 22) translated hell, even in the Prot. translation, cannot signify only the grave. Wi.
  • Ver. 27. If they hear not Moses, &c. We think that if we saw a man raised from the dead, who should tell us what he had seen and suffered in another world, it would make more impression upon us than past miracles, which we hear of, or the promises and threats of the prophets, apostles, and our blessed Saviour, which are contained in the Scripture; but it is a false notion, a vain excuse. The wicked, and unbelievers, would even in that case find pretexts and objections for not believing. S. Chrys. hom. iv.—They would say that the dead man was a phantom; that his resurrection was not real; his assertion nugatory. When Christ raised Lazarus from the dead, the miracle was known, evident and public, yet we find none of the Pharisees converted by it. They were even so mad as to enter into a design to kill Lazarus, to get rid of a witness who deposed against their incredulity. How many other miracles did he not perform in their sight, which they attributed to the prince of darkness, or to magic? Christ raised himself from the dead. This fact was attested by many unexceptionable witnesses. And what do the hardened Jews do? They object, that his disciples, stealing away the body, maliciously persuaded the people that he had risen again. Such is the corruption of the human heart, that when once delivered up to any passion, nothing can movie it. Every day we see or hear of malefactors publicly executed yet their example has no effect on the survivors, nor does it prevent the commissions of fresh crimes. Calmet.—“We have also the more firm prophetical word; whereunto you do well to attend, as to a light that shineth in a dark place, until the day dawn, and the day-star arise in your hearts.” 2 Pet. i. 19.—We may learn many very instructive lessons from this affecting history of Lazarus.—The rich may learn the dreadful consequences to be apprehended from riches, when made subservient to sensuality, luxury, and ambition. The poor may learn to make their poverty and sufferings however grievous the nature, instrumental to their future happiness, by bearing them with patience and resignation and resignation to the will of heaven. The former are taught that to expose a man to eternal misery, nothing more is required than to enjoy all the good things of this world according to their own will; the latter that however they may be despised and rejected of men, they may still have courage, knowing that the short day of this fleeting life, with all its apparent evils will soon be over; and that the day of eternity is fast approaching, when everyone shall receive according as he has done good or evil in his body.
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Sunday Scripture Readings September 19 2010 25th Sunday in Ordinary Time

September 19 2010 Twenty Fifth Sunday in Ordinary Time
Disclaimer – Official Readings of the Liturgy at – http://www.usccb.org/nab/

Amos 8:4-7
from Douay-Rheims at SacredBible.org

Hear this, you that crush the poor, and make the needy of the land to fail, Saying: When will the month be over, and we shall sell our wares: and the sabbath, and we shall open the corn: that we may lessen the measure, and increase the sicle (shekel*), and may convey in deceitful balances, That we may possess the needy for money, and the poor for a pair of shoes, and may sell the refuse of the corn?

The Lord hath sworn against the pride of Jacob: surely I will never forget all their works.

1 Timothy 2:1-8 Haydock NT
Prayers are to be said for all men: because God wills the salvation of all.
Women are not to teach

I DESIRE, therefore, first of all, that supplications, prayers, intercessions, and thanksgivings, be made for all men: For kings, and for all who are in high station, that we may lead a quiet and peaceable life, in all piety and chastity. For this is good and acceptable in the sight of God, our Saviour, Who will have all men to be saved, and to come to the knowledge of the truth. For there is one God, and one mediator of God and men, the man Christ Jesus: Who gave himself a redemption for all, a testimony in due times: Whereunto I am appointed a preacher, and an apostle, (I say the truth, I lie not) a doctor of the Gentiles in faith and truth. I will, therefore, that men pray in every place, lifting up pure hands without anger and strife.

Luke 16:1-13 Haydock NT
CHAP. XVI
The parable of the unjust steward: of the rich man and Lazarus.

AND he said also to his disciples:

There was a certain rich man who had a steward: and the same was accused unto him, that he had wasted his goods. And he called him, and said to him:

‘How is it that I hear this of thee? Give an account of thy stewardship: for now thou canst be steward no longer.’

And the steward said within himself: ‘What shall I do, for my lord taketh away from me the stewardship? To dig I am not able: To beg I am ashamed. I know what I will do, that when I shall be put out of the stewardship, they may receive me into their houses.’

Therefore, calling together every one of his lord’s debtors, he said to the first: ‘How much dost thou owe my lord?’

But he said: ‘A hundred barrels of oil.’

And he said to him: ‘Take thy bill: and sit down quickly, and write fifty.’

Then he said to another: ‘And how much dost thou owe?’

Who said: ‘A hundred quarters of wheat.’

He said to him: ‘Take thy bill and write eighty.’

And the lord commended the unjust steward, forasmuch as he had done wisely: for the children of this world are wiser in their generation than the children of light.

And I say to you: Make to yourselves friends of the mammon of iniquity, that when you shall fail, they may receive you into everlasting dwellings. He that is faithful in that which is least, is faithful also in that which is greater: And he that is unjust in that which is little, is unjust in that which is greater. If then you have not been faithful in the unjust mammon, who will trust you with that which is the true? And if you have not been faithful in that which is another’s: who will give you that which is your own? No servant can serve two masters: for either you he will hate the one, and love the other; or he will hold to the one, and despise the other: you cannot serve God and mammon.

Haydock Commentary Amos 8:4-7

  • Ver. 5. Month: the first day was observed as a festival. Num. x. 10. H.—At the expiration of the month usurers demanded their money. Hor. i. sat. 3. Aristoph. Nub. ii. 1.—Corn,to sell after the sabbatical year, when it was dearest. Sabbath also denotes all “festivals.” These misers think that there are too many.—Sicle. Having a large measure to buy, and a small one to sell again. Deut. xxv. 13. Prov. xx. 10.
  • Ver. 6. Shoes, for almost nothing. Thus they forced the poor to serve, or to sell their effects.
  • Ver. 7. Jacob, because the rich despise the poor. It may also mean, that he swore by heaven or the temple, (Lev. xxvi. 19.) or that he would destroy the high places. C.

Haydock Commentary 1 Timothy 2:1-8

  • Ver. 1. Intercessions, as in the Prot. Translation. If men’s intercessions to God in favour of others, are no injury to Christ, as our mediator, how can it be any injury to Christ for the Angels and saints in heaven to pray or intercede to God for us? Wi.—S. Austin writes thus on this verse: By supplications are meant what are said before the consecration. By prayers, what are said in and after the consecration and communion, at mass, including the Pater Noster; which S. Jerome also says, our Lord taught his apostles to recite at the daily sacrifice of his body. l. iii. cont. Pelag. C. 5. By intercessions, what are said after the communion: and by thanksgivings, what both priest and people give to God for so great a mystery then offered and received. ep. 50. ad. Paulin. See S. Chrys. in hunc locum.
  • Ver. 2. For kings, who were then heathens, this being in Nero’s time. Wi.—Upon the happiness of the king generally depends that of his subjects. We pray for the emperors, says Tertullian, that God would grant them a long life, a secure throne, and a safe family, brave armies, a faithful council, and a just people. In fine, that he would grant them peace, and whatever else they could wish, either for themselves or their empire. Apologet. Cap. 30.
  • Ver. 4. All men to be saved. They contradict this, and other places of the Scripture, as well as the tradition and doctrine of the Catholic Church, who teach that God willeth only the salvation of the predestinated, of the elect, and as they say, of the first-begotten only: and that he died only for them, and not for all mankind. But if it is the will of God that all and every one be saved, and no one resists, or can frustrate the will of the Almighty, whence comes it that every one is not saved? To understand and reconcile divers places in the holy Scriptures, we must needs distinguish in God a will that is absolute and effectual, accompanied with the special graces and assistances, and with the gift of final perseverance, by which, through his pure mercy, he decreed to save the elect, without any prejudice to their free will and liberty; and a will, which by the order of Providence, is conditional, and this not a metaphorical and improper will only, but a true and proper will, by which he hath prepared and offered graces and means to all men, whereby they may work their salvation; and if they are not saved, it is by their own fault, by their not corresponding with the graces offered, it is because they resist the Holy Ghost. Acts vii. 51. If in this we meet with difficulties, which we cannot comprehend, the words of S. Paul, (Rom. ix. 20.) O man, who are thou, who repliest against God? May be sufficient to make us work our salvation with fear and trembling. Wi.
  • Ver. 5-6. One mediator of God and men, the man Christ Jesus: who gave himself a redemption for all. Take these words together, and we may easily understand in what sense the apostle calls our Saviour Christ, the one or only mediator; that is, he is the only mediator, who at the same time is our Redeemer; the only mediator who could mediate betwixt God, the person offended by sin, and men the offenders; the only mediator who reconciled God to mankind by his incarnation and death, by the infinite price of his blood, by his own merits, independently of the merits of any other. All Catholics allow that the dignity and office of mediator in this sense belongs only to our Redeemer, Jesus Christ, the Son of God, made man to save us. The sense then of this place is, that as there is but one God, who created all, so there is but one mediator, who redeemed all. But yet the name of mediator is not so appropriated to Christ, but that in an inferior and different sense the Angels and saints in heaven, and even men on earth, who pray to God for the salvation of others, may be called mediators, intercessors, or advocates; and we may apply ourselves to them to pray, interceded , and mediate for us, without any injury to Christ, since we acknowledge that all their intercession and mediation is always grounded on the merits of Christ, our Redeemer. The same word for mediator, in the Greek as well as in the Latin, is given to Moses, God’s servant. Gal. iii. 19. See also Deut. v. 5. The words of our Saviour himself, (Mat. xxiii.) taken according to the letter, contain an express prohibition of being called masters, or fathers; and this reason is given, because all men have one Father in heaven, and because Christians have one master, Christ. Yet no one can justly pretend from thence, that in a different sense, a man may not be called father or master, without any injury to God, or to Christ. Wi.—Christ is the one and only mediator of redemption; who gave himself, as the apostle writes, a redemption for all. He is also the only mediator, who stands in need of no other to recommend his petitions to the Father. But this is not against our seeking the prayers and intercessions, as well of the faithful upon earth, as of the saints and Angels in heave, for obtaining mercy, grace, and salvation, through Jesus Christ. As S. Paul himself often desired the help of the prayers of the faithful, without any injury to the mediatorship of Jesus Christ. Ch.—If there be other mediators among the Angels and saints, they are only so in subordination to the first, who by themselves have no right to mediation or favours, and who cannot demand them but through the merits of him who is our only essential mediator. Estius, Menoch. &c. Consult. Judg. iii. 9. 2 Esdras. ix 17. Acts vii. 35.—A redemption for all. Not only for the predestinate, not only for the just, not only for the faithful, but for all Gentiles and infidels: and therefore he says again, (c. iv. 10.) that Christ is the Saviour of all men, and especially of the faithful. See S. Aug. and S. Chrysostom. Wi.
  • Ver. 8. How beautifully does S. Paul teach that modesty and chastity are the greatest ornaments of the female sex, not only in the sight of God and of Angels, but also of men, who although by their own neglect they have not always grace and courage sufficient to be virtuous themselves, cannot help admiring virtue wherever they see it in others. Even the pagan fully acknowledges the native attractions of virtue. Virtus per se placet: Virtue pleases with unborrowed charms.

Haydock Commentary Luke 16:1-13

  • Ver. 1. There was a certain rich man, &c. By this parable, our Saviour advises his disciples to accompany their penitential works with deeds of mercy to the poor. Ven. Bede.—There is a certain erroneous opinion, that obtains pretty generally amongst mankind, and which tends to increase crimes, and to lessen good works: and this is, the foolish persuasion that men are not accountable to anyone, and that we can dispose as we please of the things in our possession. S. Chrys.—Whereas we are here informed, that we are only the dispensers of another’s property, viz. God’s. S. Amb.—When, therefore, we employ it not according to the will of our Master, but fritter and squander it away in pleasure, and in the gratification of our passions, we are, beyond all doubt, unjust stewards. Theophylactus.—And a strict account will be required of what we have thus dissipated, by our common Lord and Master. If then we are only stewards of that which we possess, let us cast from our minds that mean superciliousness and pride which the outward splendour of riches is so apt to inspire; and let us put on the humility, the modesty of stewards, knowing well that to whom much is given, much will be required. Abundance of riches makes not a man great, but the dispensing them according to the will and intention of his man great, but the dispensing them according to the will and intention of his employer. A.—The intention of this parable, is to shew what use each one ought to make of the goods which God has committed to his charge. In the three former parables, addressed to the murmuring Scribes and Pharisees, our Saviour shews with what goodness he seeks the salvation and conversion of a sinner; in this, he teaches how the sinner, when converted, ought to correspond to his vocation, and preserve with great care the inestimable blessing of innocence. Calmet.—A steward, &c. The parable puts us in mind, that let men be ever so rich or powerful in this world, God is still their master; they are his servants, and must be accountable to him how they have managed his gifts and favours; that is, all things they have had in this world. Wi.
  • Ver. 2. And he called him, &c. Such are the words which our Lord daily addresses to us. We daily see persons equally healthy, and likely to live as ourselves, suddenly summoned by death, to give an account of their stewardship. Happy summons to the faithful servant, who has reason to hope in his faithful administration. Not so to the unfaithful steward, whose pursuits are earthly: death to him is terrible indeed, and his exit is filled with sorrow. All thunderstricken at these words, “now thou canst be steward no long,” he says within himself, what shall I do! Ex. D. Thoma.
  • Ver. 8. And the lord commended, &c. By this we are given to understand, that if the lord of this unjust steward could commend him for his worldly prudence, though it were an overt act of injustice; how much more will the Almighty be pleased with those who, obedient to his command, seek to redeem their sins by alms-deeds? Ex. D. Thoma.—“Give alms out of thy substance,” says holy Toby to his son, “and turn not thy face from any poor person: for so it shall come to pass, that the face of the Lord shall not be turned from thee. According to thy abilities be merciful. If thou hast much, give abundantly; if thou hast little, take care, even of that little, to bestow willingly a little. For thus thou storest up to thyself a good reward, for the day of necessity. For alms deliver from sin, and from death, and will not suffer the soul to go into darkness.” Tob. iv. 7, 8, &c. Ibidem.—Children of this world, &c. are more prudent and circumspect as to what regards their temporal concerns, than they who profess themselves servants of God, are about the concerns of eternity.—Commended the unjust steward. Lit. the steward of iniquity: not for his cheating and injustice, but for his contrivances in favour of himself.—In their generation; i.e. in their concerns of this life. They apply themselves with greater care and pains, in their temporal affairs, than the children of light, whom God has favoured with the light of faith, do to gain heaven. Wi.
  • Ver. 9. Make to yourselves friends, &c. Not that we are authorized to wrong our neighbor, to give to the poor: evil is never to be done, that good may come from it. D. Thomas.—But we are exhorted to make the poor our friends before God, by relieving them with the riches which justly indeed belong to us, but are called the mammon of iniquity, because only the iniquitous man esteems them as riches, on which he sets his affections; whilst the riches of the virtuous are wholly celestial and spiritual. S. Aug. de quaest. Evang.—Of the mammon of iniquity. Mammon is a Syriac word for riches; and so it might be translated, of the riches of iniquity. Riches are called unjust, and riches of iniquity, not of themselves, but because they are many times the occasion of unjust dealings, and of all kind of vices. Wi.—Mammon signifies riches. They are here called the mammon of iniquity, because oftentimes ill-gotten, ill-bestowed, or an occasion of evil; and at the best are but worldly and false: and not the true riches of a Christian.—They may receive. By this we see, that the poor servants of God, whom we have relieved by our alms, may hereafter, by their intercession, bring our souls to heaven. Ch.—They may receive you into their eternal tabernacles. What a beautiful thought this! What a consolation to the rich man, when the term of his mortal existence is approaching, to think he shall have as many advocates to plead for his admittance into the eternal mansions of rest, as he has made friends among the poor by relieving their temporal wants. The rich give to the poor earthly treasures, the latter return in recompense eternal and infinite happiness. Hence we must infer, that the advantage is all on the side of the giver; according to the saying of our Lord, happier is the condition of him who gives, than of him who receives. A.
  • Ver. 10. He that is faithful in that which is least. This seems to have been a common saying, and that men judged of the honesty of their servants by their fidelity in lesser matters. For example, a master that sees his servant will not steal a little thing, judges that he will not steal a greater, &c.—And he that is unjust in that which is little, is unjust also in that which is greater. The interpreters take notice, that here temporal goods are called little, and spiritual goods are called greater; so that the sense is, that such men as do not make a right use of their temporal goods, in the service of God, will not make a good use of spiritual graces as they ought to do. See Maldonatus. Wi.
  • Ver. 11. If then you have not been faithful in the unjust mammon; i.e. in fading and false riches, which are the occasion of unjust and wicked proceedings.—Who will trust you with that which is the true? i.e. God will not intrust you with the true and spiritual riches of his grace. Wi.
  • Ver. 12. And if you have not been faithful in that which is another’s: so again is called false worldly wealth, which passeth from one to another; so that it cannot be called a man’s own, who will give you that which is your own? i.e. how can you hope that God will bestow upon you, or commit to your care, spiritual riches or gifts, which, when rightly managed, would be your own for all eternity? See S. Aug. l. ii. qq. Evang. q. 35. p. 263. Wi.—That which is another’s. Temporal riches may be said to belong to another, because they are the Lord’s; and we have only the dispensing of them: so that when we give alms, we are liberal of another’s goods. But if we are not liberal in giving what is another’s, how shall we be so in giving our own? Nothing one would have thought so properly belonged to the Jews, as the kingdom of heaven, the preaching of the gospel, and the knowledge of heavenly things. But they were deprived of all for their infidelity in the observance of the law, which was first intrusted to them. Calmet.
  • Ver. 13. No servant can serve two masters, &c. This is added to shew us, that to dispose of our riches according to the will of the Almighty, it is necessary to keep our minds free from all attachment to them. Theophylactus.—Let the avaricious man here learn, that to be a lover of riches, is to be an enemy of Christ. Ven. Bede.

Daily Scripture Readings Thursday September 9 2010 Memorial of St Peter Claver Priest

September 9 2010 Thursday Memorial of Saint Peter Claver, priest
Disclaimer – Official Readings of the Liturgy at – http://www.usccb.org/nab/

1 Corinthians 8:1b-7, 11-13
Haydock New Testament

NOW concerning those things that are sacrificed to idols, we know that we all have knowledge. Knowledge puffeth up; but charity edifieth. And if any man think that he knoweth any thing, he hath not yet known, as he ought to know. But if any man love God, the same is known by him.

But as for the meats that are offered in sacrifice to idols, we know that an idol is nothing in the world, and that there is no God but one. For though there be that are called gods, either in heaven or on earth (for there are many gods, and many lords);  Yet to us there is but one God, the Father; of whom are all things, and we unto him: and one Lord Jesus Christ: by whom are all things, and we by him.

And through thy knowledge shall the weak brother perish, for whom Christ died? Now when you sin thus against the brethren, and wound their weak conscience, you sin against Christ. Wherefore, if meat scandalize my brother, I will never eat flesh, lest I should scandalize my brother.

Responsorial Psalm 138:1b-3, 13-14ab, 23-24 (Ps 139 NAB/Hebrew)
DR Challoner Text Only

Lord, thou hast proved me,
and known me:
Thou hast known my sitting down,
and my rising up.
Thou hast understood my thoughts afar off:
my path and my line thou hast searched out.
For thou hast possessed my reins:
thou hast protected me from my mother’s womb.
I will praise thee, for thou art fearfully magnified:
wonderful are thy works,
and my soul knoweth right well.
Prove me, O God, and know my heart:
examine me, and know my paths.
And see if there be in me the way of iniquity:
and lead me in the eternal way.

The Holy Gospel of Jesus Christ According to Saint Luke 6:27-38
Haydock New Testament

Jesus said:

But I say to you that hear:
Love your enemies, do good to them that hate you. Bless them that curse you, and pray for them that calumniate you. And to him that striketh thee on the one cheek, offer also the other. And him that taketh away from thee thy cloak, hinder not to take thy coat also. Give to every one that asketh thee, and of him that taketh away thy goods, ask them not again.

And as you would that men should do to you,  do you also to them, in like manner. And if you love them that love you, what thanks have you? For sinners also love those that love them. And if you do good to them that do good to you; what thanks have you? For sinners also do this. And if you lend to them of whom you hope to receive; what thanks have you? For sinners also lend to sinners, to receive as much.

But love ye your enemies:  do good, and lend, hoping for nothing thereby:  and your reward shall be great,  and you shall be the sons of the Most High:  for he is kind to the unthankful, and to the evil.
Be ye, therefore, merciful,  as your father also is merciful.  Judge not, and you shall not be judged:
condemn not, and you shall not be condemned.  Forgive, and you shall be forgiven.

Give, and it shall be given to you: good measure, and pressed down, and shaken together, and running over, shall they give into your bosom. For with the same measure that you shall mete, it shall be measured to you again.

Haydock Commentary 1 Corinthians 8
Notes Copied From Haydock Commentary Site

  • Ver. 1. Now concerning those things. It appears from  this whole passage that the Corinthians had, in a former letter, consulted this apostle, upon the subject of eating meats offered to idols.  It was not unusual to reserve some part of the sacrifice of which they made a supper, either in their own family, with their friends, or sometimes even in the temple.  Some of the Christians of Corinth attended without scruple at these sorts of feasts, and eat of the meats offered to idols; whilst others, on the contrary, took scandal at this conduct, and thought it a tacit approbation of idolatry.  S. Paul being consulted upon this difficulty, gives them his advice in this chapter.  Calmet. We know that we all have knowledge about it.  That is, all we, who are sufficiently instructed, have knowledge enough to be convinced, that idols are nothing in themselves, nor the meats offered to them better nor worse upon that account.  Wi. Knowledge puffeth up, &c.  Knowledge, without charity and humility, serveth only to puff persons up.  Ch.
  • Ver. 4. An idol is nothing. The apostle seems to allude in this place to the Greek signification of this word, eidwlon, signifying a false representation; as for instance in ghosts, which are said to appear sometimes at night.  Umbræ tenues, simulacra luce carentium. Calmet.
  • Ver. 5. Many gods, &c.  Reputed for such among the heathens.  Ch.
  • Ver. 6. To us there is but one God, the Father; of whom all things, and we unto him. Of or from the Father are all things, even the eternal Son and the Holy Ghost, though they are one and the same God with the Father. And one Lord Jesus Christ: by whom are all things, and we by him. All things were created by the Son of God, the eternal and uncreated wisdom of the Father, from whom he proceeds from eternity, and also by the Holy Ghost, all creatures being equally the work of the three divine persons.  The Arians and Socinians pretend from this place, that only the Father is truly and properly God.  The Catholics answer, that he is called the God, of whom all, because from him always proceeded, do proceed, and shall always proceed the Son and the Holy Ghost, though one and the same God in nature, substance, &c.  And that when he is called the one God, by these words are excluded the false gods of the heathens, not the Son, and the Holy Ghost, who are but one God with the Father.  S. Chrys. also here observes, (hom. xx.) that if the two other persons are excluded, because the Father is called one God, by the same way of reasoning it would follow, that because Jesus Christ is called the one Lord, neither the Holy Ghost, nor even the Father, are the one Lord, whereas the Scriptures many times express the divine majesty, as well by the word Lord as by the word God.  Wi.
  • Ver. 7. But knowledge is not in every one, &c.  The new converts, who had been Jews, thought that things which had been offered to idols were defiled, unclean, and could not be lawfully eaten: they who had been Gentiles looked upon them as victims offered to idols, in which there was some virtue of enchantment, &c.  Their weak consciences judged they could not be lawfully eaten: and when they were induced to eat them by the example of others, it was still against their consciences.  The infidels also might sometimes think that the Christians, in eating such things, honoured their idols; in such cases, they who were better instructed, were to abstain, not to give offence to weak consciences, and lest they should make them sin.  And a weak brother shall perish, for whom Christ died; where we may learn, that Christ died also for those the shall perish, and not only for the predestinate.  Wi.
  • Ver. 8-9. Meat doth not commend us to God. It is an admonition to those, who because they knew that meats offered to idols were not worse, would not abstain, even when this scandalized the weak brethren: he tells them that eating or not eating of them, does not make them more acceptable to God, nor puts them to any inconvenience, since they may get other meats: therefore they ought not to make use of their liberty, when it proves a stumbling-block to the weak, and makes them sin.  Wi.
  • Ver. 10. In the idol’s temple.[1]  It does not seem likely that any Christians would go to eat with idolaters in their very temples, of things offered to their idols: so that we may rather understand any place where infidels and Christians eat together, and where it happened that some meats were brought which had been first offered to idols, which the well-instructed Christians regarded not, nor asked any questions about, but the weak scrupled to eat them.  Wi. Shall not his conscience. The meaning of S. Paul’s words is this: Will not your weak brother, who is not endowed with so great a knowledge as you, be induced, from your example, to eat these meats offered to idols, believing that he will derive therefrom some benefit.  Estius.
  • Ver. 13. If meat scandalize. That is, if my eating cause my brother to sin.  Ch. Can we put any meat, or life itself, in competition with a soul, and the blood of Christ, which has been shed for that soul, when we know the value of each!

Haydock Commentary Luke 6:27-38

  • Ver. 30. Jesus Christ does not order us never to refuse a petition: but the meaning of his words is, that we are to give what is just and reasonable, what will be neither injurious to yourself nor your family; for what is unjustly asked, may be justly denied.  S. Austin, l. x. c. 40. de serm. Dom. in Monte. But in this, the sin we commit is often far from trivial; particularly, when to the refusal of a just request, we add also reprehensions and complaints.  For why, say we, does he not labour? why has he reduced himself to penury, through his own indolence? But, tell me, do you live upon the fruits of your own industry?  On the supposition that you do, is it not that you may have some plea to reprehend another for the morsel of bread he begs at your hands?  You give him no charitable relief, give him then no contumelious words: if you have no compassion for him yourself, do not prevent others from shewing him commiseration.  Abraham, in the number of guests he received, had the honour of receiving under his roof even angels.  Let us not, therefore, be strict and unfavourable judges in regard of our suffering and distressed neighbours, lest perhaps we ourselves come to be more severely judged.  S. Chrys. collected from hom. xxi. in ep. ad. Rom. Hom. xi. in ep. ad. Heb. and hom. ii. de Lazaro.
  • Ver. 35. Hoping for nothing, but merely impelled by a desire of doing good.  They who only give when sure of having a greater return, do not give, but traffic with their generosity; in which there is no charity.  A.
  • Ver. 37. What can be imagined more kind, what more merciful, than this conduct of our Sovereign Lord, that the sentence of the judge should be left in the hands of the person to judged?  Jans. Comment. in sanct. Evang.
  • Ver. 38. Here all solicitude of diffidence, all delay of avarice, is cut off; for what truth promises to repay, humility may safe expend.  S. Leo. Serm. vi.

Daily Scripture Readings Saturday August 28 2010 Memorial of St Augustine Bishop and Doctor of the Church

August 28 2010 Saturday Memorial of St Augustine, Bishop and Doctor of the Church
Disclaimer – Official Readings of the Liturgy at – http://www.usccb.org/nab/

1 Corinthians 1:26-31
Haydock New Testament

For see your vocation, brethren, that not many wise according to the flesh, not many mighty, not many noble: But the foolish things of the world hath God chosen, that he may confound the wise: and the weak things of the world hath God chosen, that he may confound the strong: And the mean things of the world, and the things that are contemptible, hath God chosen, and the things that are not, that he might destroy the things that are: That no flesh should glory in his sight.

But of him you are in Christ Jesus, who is made to us wisdom from God, and justice, and sanctification, and redemption: That, as it is written, He that glorieth, may glory in the Lord.

Responsorial Psalm 32:12-13, 18-21 (Ps 33 NAB)
DR Challoner Text Only

Blessed is the nation whose God is the Lord:
the people whom he hath chosen for his inheritance.
The Lord hath looked from heaven:
he hath beheld all the sons of men.
Behold the eyes of the Lord are on them that fear him:
and on them that hope in his mercy.
To deliver their souls from death;
and feed them in famine.
Our soul waiteth for the Lord:
for he is our helper and protector.
For in him our heart shall rejoice:
and in his holy name we have trusted.

The Holy Gospel of Jesus Christ According to Saint Matthew 25:14-30
Haydock New Testament

For even as a man going into a far country, called his servants, and delivered to them his goods; And to one he gave five talents, and to another two, and to another one, to every one according to his proper ability: and immediately he took his journey. And he that had received the five talents, went his way, and traded with the same, and gained other five. And in like manner he that had received the two, gained other two. But he that had received the one, going his way, digged in the earth, and hid his lord’s money. But after a long time, the lord of those servants came, and reckoned with them. And he that had received the five talents, coming, brought other five talents, saying:

Lord, thou deliveredst to me five talents; behold I have gained other five over and above.

His lord said to him:

Well done, thou good and faithful servant: because thou hast been faithful over a few things, I will set thee over many things: enter thou into the joy of thy lord.

And he also that had received the two talents came and said:

Lord, thou deliveredst two talents to me: behold I have gained other two.

His lord said to him:

Well done, good and faithful servant: because thou hast been faithful over a few things, I will set thee over many things: enter thou into the joy of thy lord.

But he that had received the one talent, came, and said:

Lord, I know that thou art a hard man; thou reapest where thou hast not sown, and gatherest where thou hast not strewed:And being afraid, I went and hid thy talent in the earth:behold here thou hast that which is thine.

And his lord answering, said to him:

Wicked and slothful servant, thou knewest that I reap where I sow not, and gather where I have not strewed. Thou oughtest, therefore, to have committed my money to the bankers, and at my coming, I should have received my own with usury. Take ye away, therefore, the talent from him, and give it to him that hath ten talents.

For to every one that hath, shall be given, and he shall abound: but from him that hath not, that also which he seemeth to have shall be taken away. And the unprofitable servant, cast ye out into the exterior darkness. There shall be weeping and gnashing of teeth.

Haydock Commentary 1 Corinthians 1: 26-31
Notes Copied From Haydock Commentary Site

  • Ver. 26-28. Vocation, is here used for the called, as Rom. iii. 30. circumcision for the circumcised, (ibid. xi. 7.) election for the elect.  V. Consider you manner of being called; not many, hitherto, of those who have believed, or of those who have preached the gospel, are wise according to the flesh, or as to worldly wisdom; and in the esteem of men, not many mighty, not many noble. God hath chosen such as are looked upon as illiterate, without power, without riches, without human wisdom, to confound the great and wise men: He hath chosen the things that are not, that is, says S. Chrys. men reputed as nothing, of no consideration, to confound, to destroy, to make subject to him, and to the gospel, men who had the greatest worldly advantages, that no flesh, no men how great, wise, rich, or powerful soever, might glory in his sight, or attribute their call, and their salvation to their own merits. From him you are in Christ Jesus brought to believe in him, who is made to us wisdom, acknowledged to be the wisdom of his eternal Father, by whom we have been justified, sanctified, redeemed.  We have nothing of ourselves to boast of, and can only glory in the Lord. Wi. And the mean things. In the beginning of Christianity, it was frequently objected to the Christians, that they had none but men of the basest extraction.  The emperor Julian likewise made the Catholics the same reproach.  Grot. But this objection was not founded; for we find many persons of considerable mention in the Scriptures, who had embraced Christianity.  Witness, v. 1. of this chap. Sosthenes, the head of the synagogue at Corinth, and some in the very palace of Cæsar.
  • Ver. 29. Glory in his sight. God wished it to be known, that the establishment of his Church was not the work of human wisdom or power, but of the omnipotent power of his divinity.  Calmet.
  • We may here admire, (v. 1.) the happiness of those who, like S. Paul, are called to the sacred ministry, not through human respects, nor by any influence of parents, by the vocation of heaven. V. 2. We have here the model and origin of all future pastoral letters. V. 3. &c. he gives thanks to God for past favours, and prays for a continuation of graces and blessings. V. 10. He begs that there be no schisms found among them, but that unanimity of sentiment and disposition may reign among them, certain and unequivocal marks of truth. V. 12. &c. He shews that both pastors and flocks should look up to God, as the only source of truth and grace; that it is a crying injustice to withdraw any share of our heart and confidence from God, to fix it on any thing that is not God; as it is to attach ourselves to the ministers of truth, and not to the Truth itself.  Therefore, concludes S. Paul, though the Jews call for miracles, and the Gentiles lean upon worldly wisdom, Christians must seek their strength and success in the weakness of the cross, and their glory in the ignominy of Christ crucified, to whom alone be all the honour and glory for ever and ever. Amen.

Haydock Commentary Matthew 25:14-30

  • Ver. 14. But that the apostles and all men might learn how they ought to watch, and to prepare for the last day, he subjoins another instructive parable of the ten talents.  It has a great affinity with that mentioned in S. Luke, xix. 11.  But this last was spoken at a different time, place, and occasion.  It differs also in some points. For even as a man, &c.  This passage is to be understood of our divine Redeemer, who ascended to heaven encompassed by his human nature.  The proper abode for the flesh is the earth; when, therefore, it is placed in the kingdom of God, it may be said to be gone into a far country.  S. Gregory. But when we speak of his divine nature, we cannot say that he is gone into a far country, but only when we speak of his humanity.  Origen.
  • Ver. 15. In the parable of the talents, the master is God, talents, graces, &c.  Wi. From this, it appears, we can do no good of ourselves, but only by means of God’s grace, though he requires our co-operation; since the servants could only make use of the talents given them to gain others.  (A talent is £187 10s.)  It is also worthy of remark, that both he who received five and he who received only two talents, received an equal reward of entering into the joy of our Lord; which shews, that only an account will be taken according to what we have received, and that however mean and despicable our abilities may be, we still have an equal facility with the most learned of entering heaven.  Jans. The servant to whom this treasure was delivered, is allegorically explained of the faithful adorers of God, in the Jewish law, who departing from it, became followers of Christ, and therefore deserving of a double recompense. . . . The servant to whom the two talents were delivered, is understood of the Gentiles, who were justified in the faith and confession of the Father and the Son, and confessed our Lord Jesus Christ, God and man, composed of body and soul; and as the people of the Jews doubled the five talents they received, so the Gentiles, by the duplication of their two talents, merited a double recompense also. . . . But the servant who received only one talent, and hid it in the ground, represented such of the Jews as persisted in the observation of the old law, and thus kept their talent buried in the ground, for fear the Gentiles should be converted.  S. Hilary.
  • Ver. 18. He that had received the one. The man who hid this one talent, represents all those who, having received any good quality, whether mental or corporal, employ it only on earthly things.  S. Gregory. Origen is also of the same sentiment: if you see any one, says he, who has received from God the gift of teaching and instructing others to salvation, yet will not exercise himself in this function, he buries his talent in the ground, like this unworthy servant, and must expect to receive the like reward.
  • Ver. 19. After a long time. This represents the time that is to intervene between our Saviour’s ascension and his last coming.  For, as he is the Master, who went into a far country, i.e. to heaven, after he had inculcated the relative duties of each man in his respective state of life; so shall he come at the last day, and reckon with all men, commending those who have employed their talents well, and punishing such as have made a bad use of them.  S. Jerom.
  • Ver. 20. I have gained other five. Free-will, aided by the grace of God, doth evidently merit as we see here.
  • Ver. 24. I know that thou art a hard man. This is an insignificant part, that is, an ornament of the parable only; as also when it is said: I should have received mine with usury, v. 27.  Wi. This seems to have been an adage levelled at avaricious men, who are never pleased but with what increases their hoards.  Under this symbol is also depicted the excuse of many, who accuse God of being too severe and unbending, whose service is extremely hard, and who adopts, rejects, and reprobates whom he pleases; who deals out heavier burdens than the weak nature of man is made to support; who denies the grace of obedience, and thus wishes to reap where he has not sown.  Jans.
  • Ver. 26. Thou evil and slothful servant, for thus calumniating thy master; if I wish to reap where I have not sown, how ought you to fear my just indignation, if were I have sown I find nothing by your neglect to reap.  Thus our Lord retorts the accusation upon the servant, as in Luke xix. 22.  Out of thy own mouth I judge thee, thou wicked servant.
  • Ver. 29. To every one that hath, &c.  That is, who hath, so as to have made good use of, or to have improved, what was committed to his trust and management.  See the notes Matt. xiii, v. 12.  Wi. When those who are gifted with the grace of understanding for the benefit of others, refuse to make a proper use of the gift, that grace is of consequence withdrawn; whereas had they employed it with zeal and diligence, they would have received additional graces.  S. Chrys. hom. lxxix. This, moreover, shews that God never requires of men more than he has enabled them to perform.
  • Ver. 30. And the unprofitable servant. Thus not only the rapacious, the unjust, and evil doers, but also all those who neglect to do good, are punished with the greatest severity.  Let Christians listen to these words, and while time will permit them, embrace the means of salvation.  S. Chrys. hom. lxxix. Let no one suffer his talent to lie uncultivated, and, as it were, hidden and buried in this unhappy earth of the world and the flesh, which engages all their thoughts and affections more than the honour and glory of God, or the eternal welfare of their own or their neighbour’s souls. —— The foregoing parables manifestly tend to excite in us great watchfulness, under the just apprehension of the strict account which hereafter we must give of our respective talents.  Jesus, therefore, naturally concludes these parables with a description of that awful day which is to succeed the final reckoning, and which will unalterably fix our abode either in eternal happiness, or in eternal misery.  In this description we are to remark, 1. the preparations for this awful scene; 2. the sentence pronounced by the judge; 3. the execution of this sentence.

Daily Scripture Readings Thursday August 19 2010 20th Week in Ordinary Time

August 19 2010 Thursday Twentieth Week in Ordinary Time
Disclaimer – Official Readings of the Liturgy at – http://www.usccb.org/nab/

Ezekiel 36:23-28
DR Challoner

And I will sanctify my great name, which was profaned among the Gentiles, which you have profaned in the midst of them: that the Gentiles may know that I am the Lord, saith the Lord of hosts, when I shall be sanctified in you before their eyes. For I will take you from among the Gentiles, and will gather you together out of all the countries, and will bring you into your own land. And I will pour upon you clean water, and you shall be cleansed from all your filthiness, and I will cleanse you from all your idols. And I will give you a new heart, and put a new spirit within you: and I will take away the stony heart out of your flesh, and will give you a heart of flesh. And I will put my spirit in the midst of you: and I will cause you to walk in my commandments, and to keep my judgments, and do them. And you shall dwell in the land which I gave to your fathers, and you shall be my people, and I will be your God.

Responsorial Psalm 50:12-15, 18-19 (Ps 51 NAB)
DR Challoner Text Only

Create a clean heart in me, O God:
and renew a right spirit within my bowels.
Cast me not away from thy face;
and take not thy holy spirit from me.
Restore unto me the joy of thy salvation,
and strengthen me with a perfect spirit.
I will teach the unjust thy ways:
and the wicked shall be converted to thee.
For if thou hadst desired sacrifice,
I would indeed have given it:
with burnt offerings thou wilt not be delighted.
A sacrifice to God is an afflicted spirit:
a contrite and humbled heart, O God,
thou wilt not despise.

The Holy Gospel of Jesus Christ According to Saint Matthew 22:1-14
Haydock New Testament

AND Jesus answering, spoke to them again in parables, saying:

The kingdom of heaven is like to a man being a king, who made a marriage for his son. And he sent his servants, to call them that were invited to the marriage: and they would not come. Again he sent other servants, saying, Tell these that were invited:

Behold, I have prepared my dinner: my beeves and fatlings are killed, and all things are ready: come ye to the wedding.

But they neglected, and went their ways, one to his farm, and another to his merchandize. And the rest laid hands on his servants, and having treated them contumeliously, put them to death. But when the king heard of it, he was angry, and sending his armies, he destroyed those murderers, and burnt their city. Then he saith to his servants:

The wedding indeed is ready, but they that were invited, were not worthy. Go ye therefore into the highways, and as many as you shall find, invite to the wedding.

And his servants going out into the highways, gathered together all that they found, both bad and good and the wedding was filled with guests. And the king went in to see the guests: and he saw there a man who had not on a wedding-garment. And he saith to him:

Friend, how camest thou in hither not having a wedding-garment? But he was silent.

Then the king said to the waiters:

Bind him hand and foot, and cast him into the exterior darkness: there shall be weeping and gnashing of teeth.

For many are called, but few are chosen.


Haydock Commentary Ezechiel 36:23-28
Notes Copied From Haydock Commentary Site

  • Ver. 25. Water. R. David and the Chal. explain this of the remission of sin; and all Christians understand it of baptism in water, remitting all offences.  Eph. v. 26.  Tit. iii. 5.  W. — He alludes to the purification of the Jews, which prefigured baptism and penance, in which the blood of Christ is applied to our souls.  This of course was only fulfilled in his church.
  • Ver. 26. Flesh. The Jews at their return fell not so often into the sins of idolatry, &c. of which the prophets complained.  But yet they were far from answering this character.  Great irregularities prevailed under Nehemias, and in the days of the Machabees the priests publicly worshipped idols.  1 Esd. ix. and 2 Esd. v. and viii. and 2 Mac. iv. and v.  Christ enables his servants to act with purity unto the end, by the influence of his all-powerful grace.  C.
  • Ver. 27. Do them. Hence the efficacy of grace appears, (S. Aug.  H.) and hereby some keep the commandments.  W. — God assists our free-will.  Theod.  A.Lap.  C.

Haydock Commentary Matthew 22:1-14

  • Ver. 1. Jesus answered, and spoke to them again in parables, and concludes his discourse with again describing, 1st. the reprobation of the Jews; 2d. the calling of the Gentiles to the true faith; and 3d. the final judgment of both the one and the other.  In this parable of the marriage feast, says S. Chrysostom, our Saviour again declares to the Jews their reprobation, and the vocation of the Gentiles, their great ingratitude, and his tender solicitude for them.  For he did not send them a single invitation only; he repeatedly invited them.  Say, says he, to the invited; and afterwards, call the invited; thus evincing the greatness of their obstinacy, in resisting all the calls and pressing invitations of the Almighty.  Hom. lxx. This parable is certainly not the same as that mentioned in S. Luke xiv. 16, as every one that will be at the pains to examine and compare all the circumstances of each, will easily discover, though they are very much alike.  M.
  • Ver. 2. Is like to a man being a king, &c.  This parable seems different from that of Luke xiv. 16.  See S. Aug. l. ii. de Cons. Evang. c. lxx.  The main design in this parable, is to shew the Jews that they were all invited to believe in Christ; though so few of them believed.  The king is God; his son is Jesus Christ; the spouse is the Church; the marriage is Christ’s incarnation; the feast, the grace of God in this life, and his glory in the next.  His servants were the prophets; and lastly his precursor, S. John. My fatlings, which I have prepared, and made fat for the feast: but this is but an ornament of the parable.  Wi. The same takes place in the kingdom of heaven, as when a king makes a marriage feast for his son.  Jesus Christ seems to have had two things in view in this parable: 1st. that many are called to the kingdom of heaven, i.e. his Church, and that few come, as he concludes, v. 14, many are called, &c; 2d. that not all that come when called will be saved, i.e. will be reputed worthy of the celestial feast; because some have not on the wedding-garment, as he shews, v. 11.  M. Thus the conduct of God in the formation of his Church, and in the vocation of men to glory which himself has prepared for them in the kingdom of heaven, is like to that of a king, wishing to celebrate the marriage of his son.  V. Marriage is here mentioned, says S. Chrysostom to shew there is nothing sorrowful in the kingdom of God, but all full of the greatest spiritual joy.  S. John Baptist likewise calls our Saviour the spouse; and S. Paul says, I have espoused thee to one man, 2 Cor. xi.  S. Chrys. hom. lxx.  See also Eph. v. 25. and Apoc. xxi. 2. and 9.  The nuptials in this place do not signify the union of marriage, or incarnation of Jesus Christ, by which the Church is made his spouse; but the marriage feast, to which men are said to be invited.  This is no other than the doctrines, the sacraments and graces, with which God feeds and nourishes our souls, united to him by faith in this life, and by eternal joy and glory in the next.  Jans. This union is begun here on earth by faith, is cemented by charity in all such as are united to Christ in the profession of the one true faith he came down to establish, and will be consummated and made perpetual hereafter by the eternal enjoyment of Christ in his heavenly kingdom.
  • Ver. 3. His servants. John the Baptist and Christ himself, who took the form of a servant, to call such as had been formerly invited to the nuptials that were to be celebrated in his time.  The Jews were invited by Moses and the prophets, and were instructed to believe that the Messias would celebrate the happy feast.  On the predetermined day, they were again called by his servants, saying: Do penance; for the kingdom of heaven is at hand: come to the feast, i.e. become members of his Church, by believing in Christ.  Jans. In the same manner, S. Chrysostom says that the Jews had been invited by the voice of the prophets, and afterwards by the Baptist, who declared to all, that Christ should increase, but that he himself should decrease.  At length, they were invited by the Son in person, crying aloud to them: come to me all you that labour, and are heavily laden, and I will refresh you. Mat. xi. 28.  And again: if any man thirst, let him come to me and drink. S. John vii. 37. And not by his words only, but by his actions also did he call them; and after his resurrection, by the ministry of Peter and the rest of the apostles (hom. lxx,) he informed the invited Jews that the banquet was ready; because the Christian religion being now established, the way to eternal happiness was laid open to mankind.
  • Ver. 5. One to his farm. After they had put to death the Son of God, still did the Almighty invite them to the marriage-feast; but they with futile excuses declined and slighted the proffered favour, wholly taken up with their temporal concerns and sensual enjoyments, their oxen, lands and wives.  From the punishment inflicted on these, we learn, that no consideration, how specious soever it may appear, can prove a legitimate excuse for neglecting our spiritual duties.  S. John. Chrys. hom. lxx. Such as refuse to be reconciled to the holy Catholic Church, allege vain pretexts and impediments; but all these originating in pride, indolence, or human respect, will not serve at the day of general retribution and strict scrutiny.
  • Ver. 6. Put them to death. Thus the Jews had many times treated the prophets.  Wi. These were by far the most impious and the most ungrateful; tenuerunt Servos ejus, as is related in the Acts, with regard to the death of James, and Stephen, and Paul.  M.
  • Ver. 7. Sending his armies. Here our Redeemer predicts the destruction of Jerusalem, by the armies of Vespasian and Titus, sent against them by the Almighty, in punishment of their incredulity and impiety.  S. Chrys. hom. lxx. Thus the king destroyed those murderers, and burnt their city; for sooner or later God is observed to exert his vengeance on all such as despise his word, or persecute his ministers.  See the miseries to which the Jews were reduced in Josephus, book the 6th, c. ix, Hist. of the Jewish war; who declares, that in the last siege of Jerusalem 1,100,000 persons perished, and that the city was completely destroyed.  Other interpreters suppose that the evil spirits are here meant, by whom God punishes man, according to Psalm lxxvii, v. 49.  M. and Mandonatus.
  • Ver. 8. Were not worthy. The Almighty knew full well that they were not worthy; he still sent them these frequently repeated invitations, that they might be left without any excuse.  S. Chry. hom. lxx. More is signified here than the bare letter conveys; they were not only less worthy of the nuptials, but by their very great obstinacy, ingratitude and impiety, quite unworthy.  Not so the Gentiles.  Jans. Hence Christ says:
  • Ver. 9. Go ye therefore into the highways. The apostles first kept themselves within the precincts of Judea, but the Jews continually sought their destruction.  Therefore S. Paul said to them, (Acts xiii. 46.) to you it behoved us first to speak the word of God, but seeing you reject it, and judge yourselves unworthy of eternal life, behold we turn to the Gentiles. S. Chrys. hom lxx.
  • Ver. 10. Both bad and good. Christ had before told the Jews that harlots and publicans should, in preference to them, inherit the kingdom of heaven, and that the first should be last, and the last first, which preference of the Gentiles, tormented the Jews more than even the destruction of their city.  Chrys. lxx. Good and bad, persons of every tribe, tongue, people, nation, sex and profession, without any exception of persons or conditions.  Hence it is evident that the Church of God doth not consist of the elect only; and, that faith alone, without the habit of charity and good works, will not suffice to save us.  B.
  • Ver. 11. Wedding garment, which Calvin erroneously understands of faith, for he came by faith to the nuptials.  S. Augustine says it is the honour and glory of the spouse, which each one should seek, and not his own; and he shews this, in a sermon on the marriage feast, to be charity. This is the sentiment of the ancients, of S. Gregory, S. Ambrose, and others.  What S. Chrysostom expounds it, viz. an immaculate life, or a life shining with virtues, and free from the filth of sin, is nearly the same; for charity cannot exist without a good life, nor the purity of a good life, without charity.  In his 70th homily on S. Matthew, he says that the garment of life is our works; and this is here mentioned, that none might presume, (like Calvin and his followers) that faith alone was sufficient for salvation.  When, therefore we are called by the grace of God, we are clothed with a white garment, to preserve which from every stain, from every grievous sin, depends upon the diligence (the watching and praying) of every individual.  S. John. Chrys. It was the custom then, as it still is in every civilized nation, not to appear at a marriage feast, or at a dinner of ceremony, except in the very best attire.  V.
  • Ver. 12. Not having a wedding garment. By this one person, are represented all sinner void of the grace of God.  Wi. To enter with unclean garments, is to depart out of this life in the guilt of sin.  For those are no less guilty of manifesting a contempt for the Deity, who presume to sit down in the filth of an unclean conscience, than those who neglected to answer the invitations of the Almighty.  He is said to be silent, because having nothing to advance in his own defence, he remains self-condemned, and is hurried away to torments; the horrors of which words can never express.  S. Chrys. hom. lxx.

Daily Scripture Readings Saturday August 14 2010 Memorial of Saint Maximilian Mary Kolbe priest and martyr

August 14 2010 Saturday Memorial of Saint Maximilian Mary Kolbe, Priest and Martyr
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Ezekiel 18:1-10, 13b, 30-32
DR Challoner

And the word of the Lord came to me, saying:

What is the meaning? That you use among you this parable as a proverb in the land of Israel, saying: The fathers have eaten sour grapes, and the teeth of the children are set on edge. As I live, saith the Lord God, this parable shall be no more to you a proverb in Israel. Behold all souls are mine: as the soul of the father, so also the soul of the son is mine: the soul that sinneth, the same shall die. And if a man be just, and do judgment and justice, And hath not eaten upon the mountains, nor lifted up his eyes to the idols of the house of Israel: and hath not defiled his neighbour’s wife, nor come near to a menstruous woman: And hath not wronged any man: but hath restored the pledge to the debtor, hath taken nothing away by violence: hath given his bread to the hungry, and hath covered the naked with a garment: Hath not lent upon usury, nor taken any increase: hath withdrawn his hand from iniquity, and hath executed true judgment between man and man: Hath walked in my commandments, and kept my judgments, to do truth: he is just, he shall surely live, saith the Lord God.

And if he beget a son that is a robber, a shedder of blood, and that hath done some one of these things: That giveth upon usury, and that taketh an increase: shall such a one live? he shall not live. Seeing he hath done all these detestable things, he shall surely die, his blood shall be upon him. Therefore will I judge every man according to his ways, O house of Israel, saith the Lord God. Be converted, and do penance for all your iniquities: and iniquity shall not be your ruin. Cast away from you all your transgressions, by which you have transgressed, and make to yourselves a new heart, and a new spirit: and why will you die, O house of Israel?

For I desire not the death of him that dieth, saith the Lord God, return ye and live.

Psalm 50:12-15, 18-19
DR Challoner Text Only

Create a clean heart in me, O God:
and renew a right spirit within my bowels.
Cast me not away from thy face;
and take not thy holy spirit from me.
Restore unto me the joy of thy salvation,
and strengthen me with a perfect spirit.
I will teach the unjust thy ways:
and the wicked shall be converted to thee.
For if thou hadst desired sacrifice,
I would indeed have given it:
with burnt offerings thou wilt not be delighted.
A sacrifice to God is an afflicted spirit:
a contrite and humbled heart, O God,
thou wilt not despise.

The Holy Gospel of Jesus Christ According to Saint Matthew 19:13-15
Haydock New Testament

Then were little children presented to him, that he should lay his hands upon them and pray. And the disciples rebuked them. But Jesus said to them:

Suffer the little children, and forbid them not to come to me: for the kingdom of heaven is for such.

And when he had laid his hands upon them, he departed thence.

Haydock Commentary Ezechiel 18:1-10, 13, 30-32
Notes Copied From Haydock Commentary Site

  • Ver. 2. Edge. Those in captivity would not allow that they were punished for their own sins: God convinces them of the contrary.  W. — They knew that he often visited the sins of the fathers upon the children, (Ex. xx. 5. and xxiv. 5.  C.) when they also hated him, (H.) and that many had suffered for their parents’ faults, like those of Saul, David, &c.  C. — But these were all guilty of original sin at least, and death is not always a real misfortune.  H. — God seems to allow that the complaints had hitherto had some grounds, (Jer. xxxi.) but that they should be removed after the captivity, and still more effectually by the death of Christ, who came to redeem sinners, and rejected none.  By baptism he cancels original sin, the sour grape, and those who cannot receive it are not innocent.  C. — God chastises the body, but not the soul of children, for their parents’ faults: (M.) and this conduct is a trial for them, which may increase their glory.  H.
  • Ver. 4. Mine. He insinuates the vocation of the Gentiles and the general redemption.  All will be treated according to their works.  C.
  • Ver. 6. Mountains: of the sacrifices there offered to idols; (Ch.) or partaken in their usual feasts.  Some irregularly worshipped God in these high places, under many pious kings; and were tolerated, (C.) though condemned for so doing.  H. — Woman. The pagans abstained by the light of reason.  C. — The contrary practice, “it is said,” would give rise to lepers or monsters, (S. Jer.) as experience evinces.  C. — It was forbidden in the Christian Church.  S. Aug. q. 64. in Lev. xx. 18.  S. Greg. resp. 10. ad Aug.  C. — But no such questions are now asked.  The prophet insists on this no more.  v. 11, 15.
  • Ver. 7. Wronged. Lit. “constristated.”  H. — Heb. “oppressed,” maliciously.
  • Ver. 8. Increase more than what he lent, on any pretext.  S. Jer.  C.
  • Ver. 10. Robber. Heb. “breaker;” rude and lawless.  Sept. “pestilent.”
  • Ver. 13. Him. He alone is answerable, and shall suffer.
  • Ver. 30. Do penance. This is requisite, as well as a change of conduct.  W.
  • Ver. 31. New. We can do no good of ourselves: but we are admonished of our free-will, that we may do what we can, and ask for grace.  Trid. Ses. vi. 5. 11.  Jam. i. 5. and 2 Cor. iii. 5.  S. Aug. &c.)  C.

Haydock Commentary Matthew 19:13-15

  • Ver. 13. That he should lay his hands upon them. It was the custom to present children to men reputed holy, as it is now the custom for bishops and priests to pray and give a blessing to others.  Wi. It was customary with the Jews to present their children to the elders, that they might receive their blessing; hence they present them on this occasion to our Lord.  Remigius. And the disciples rebuked them, not because they were unwilling that the children should be blessed by the hands of our Saviour, but as they were yet weak in faith, they thought that, like other men, he would be teased by the importunity of the offerers.  S. Jerom. The people thought that the same hands, which could restore instantaneous health to the sick, must necessarily impart every good to such children as they should touch.  The disciples thought they made too free with their Master, requesting what, in their ideas, was beneath his dignity.  A.
  • Ver. 14. Jesus said . . . Suffer the little children, &c.  He here blames the conduct of the apostles, and shews that his assertions in praise of virginity, were not meant as derogatory from the holiness of the marriage state, by giving his blessing to these little ones, the fruits of lawful wedlock; and declares that the kingdom of heaven is the portion of such as resemble these little ones, by the innocence of their lives and simplicity of their hearts.  He, moreover, shews that confidence in our own strength, in our own free-will, and in our merits, is an invincible obstacle to salvation.  S. Mark (x. 16) says, that embracing them, and laying hands upon them, he blessed them.  Hence probably arose the ancient custom of presenting children to bishops and priests, to receive their blessing, beside that of confirmation immediately after baptism. Nicephorus tells us that the celebrated S. Ignatius, afterwards bishop of Antioch, was one of these children who, on this occasion, received Christ’s blessing. If we would enter into the kingdom of heaven, we must imitate the virtues of little children.  Their souls are free from every passion; void of every thought of revenge, they approach those who have grieved them as to their best friends.  Though the parent repeatedly chastise his child, it still will adhere to him, still it love him, and prefer him in all his poverty to all the fascinating charms of dazzling gold and purple.  They seek not beyond what is necessary, they admire not the beauty of the body, they are not grieved at the loss of worldly wealth, therefore does the Saviour of the world say, that theirs is the kingdom of heaven.  S. Chrys. hom. lxiii.

Sunday Scripture Readings August 1 2010 Eighteenth Sunday in Ordinary Time Year C

August 1 2010 Eighteenth Sunday in Ordinary Time Year C
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Ecclesiastes 1:2; 2:21-23
Douay-Rheims Challoner

Vanity of vanities, said Ecclesiastes: vanity of vanities, and all is vanity.

For when a man laboureth in wisdom, and knowledge, and carefulness, he leaveth what he hath gotten to an idle man: so this also is vanity, and a great evil. For what profit shall a man have of all his labour, and vexation of spirit, with which he hath been tormented under the sun? All his days are full of sorrows and miseries, even in the night he doth not rest in mind: and is not this vanity?

Responsorial Psalm 89:3-6, 12-14, 17 (Ps 90 NAB)
DR Challoner Text Only

Turn not man away to be brought low:
and thou hast said: Be converted, O ye sons of men.
For a thousand years in thy sight are as yesterday, which is past.
And as a watch in the night,
Things that are counted nothing, shall their years be.
In the morning man shall grow up like grass;
in the morning he shall flourish and pass away:
in the evening he shall fall, grow dry, and wither.
Can number thy wrath? So make thy right hand known:
and men learned in heart, in wisdom.
Return, O Lord, how long? and be entreated in favour of thy servants.
We are filled in the morning with thy mercy:
and we have rejoiced, and are delighted all our days.
And let the brightness of the Lord our God be upon us:
and direct thou the works of our hands over us;
yea, the work of our hands do thou direct.

Colossians 3:1-5, 9-11
Haydock NT

Therefore, if you be risen with Christ, seek the things that are above: where Christ is sitting at the right hand of God: Mind the things that are above, not the things that are on the earth. For you are dead, and your life is hidden with Christ in God. When Christ shall appear, who is your life: then shall you also appear with him in glory. Mortify therefore your members which are upon the earth: fornication, uncleanness, lust, evil concupiscence, and covetousness, which is the service of idols:

Lie not one to another: stripping yourselves of the old man with his deeds. And putting on the new, him who is renewed unto knowledge, according to the image of him, who created him. Where there is neither Gentile nor Jew, circumcision nor uncircumcision, Barbarian nor Scythian, bond or free: but Christ is all, and in all.

The Holy Gospel of Jesus Christ According to Saint Luke 12:13-31
Haydock New Testament

And one of the multitude said to him:

Master, speak to my brother that he divide the inheritance with me.

But he said to him:

Man, who hath made me a judge or divider over you?

And he said to them:

Take heed and beware of all covetousness: for a man’s life doth not consist in the abundance of things which he possesseth.

And he spoke a similitude to them, saying:

The land of a certain rich man brought forth plenty of fruits. And he thought within himself, saying: What shall I do, because I have no place to lay up together my fruits? And he said: This will I do: I will pull down my barns, and will build greater: and into them will I gather all things that are grown to me, and my goods. And I will say to my soul: Soul, thou hast much goods laid up for many years, take thy rest, eat, drink, make good cheer. But God said to him: Thou fool, this night do they require thy soul of thee: and whose shall those things be, which thou hast provided?

So is he that layeth up treasure for himself, and is not rich towards God.

And he said to his disciples:

Therefore I say to you: Be not solicitous for your life, what you shall eat: nor for your body, what you shall put on. The life is more than the food, and the body is more than the raiment. Consider the ravens, for they do not sow, nor do they reap, neither have they store-house, nor barn, and God feedeth them. How much are you more valuable than they?

And which of you by thinking can add to his stature one cubit? If then you are not able to do even the least thing, why are you solicitous for the rest? Consider the lilies how they grow: they labour not, neither do they spin. But I say to you, not even Solomon, in all his glory, was clothed like one of these. Now if God clothe in this manner the grass that is to-day in the field, and to-morrow is cast into the oven: how much more you, O ye of little faith?

And seek not you what you shall eat, or what you shall drink: and be not lifted up on high: For all these things do the nations of the world seek. But your Father knoweth that you have need of these things. But seek ye first the kingdom of God and his justice: and all these things shall be added unto you.

Haydock Commentary Ecclesiastes 1:2; 2:21-23
Notes Copied From Haydock Commentary Site

  • Ver. 2. Vanities. Most vain and despicable, (C.) and frustrating the expectations of men. M. — S. Aug. reads vanitantium, and infers that this vanity of sublunary things is an effect of man’s sin. Yet he afterwards discovered that he had read incorrectly. Ret. i. 7.
  • ECCLESIASTES 2
  • CHAPTER II.
  • Ver. 21. Wisdom. The writings of the wise are often perverted by perverse heretics. S. Jer. — Idle heirs dissipate the possessions, which had been accumulated with such industry. C. — Riches tend to encourage the profligacy of the heir. M.

Haydock Commentary Colossians 3:1-5, 9-11

  • Ver. 1. Here begins the second or the moral part of this epistle. — If you be risen, &c. The remaining part of this epistle has no great difficulties, but excellent instructions, as that to the Ephesians. Wi.
  • Ver. 5. Your members, . . . fornication, uncleanness, &c. He considers man’s body as made up of sins and sinful inclinations. Wi. — It is not to bring back Judaism we practise abstinences and fasts, nor with the same motive as the Jews, but to accomplish the precepts of mortifying the irregular desires of the flesh among which gluttony must find a place. In a mortified body sensuality is more easily subdued. A.
  • Ver. 10. According to the image of him who created him. We are created to the image of God, inasmuch as our souls are spiritual and immortal, but here we are put in mind to imitate God by sanctity and justice, as God is holy and the fountain of justice. Wi. — The image or resemblance of our Creator was effaced by sin, but is retraced by Jesus Christ, who forms in us this new man. V.
  • Ver. 11. Where, or in which state, when we put on the new man by sanctity and grace, God makes no distinction betwixt Jew and Gentile, &c. Wi. — In the Church of Christ God makes no exception of persons; all are called to the marriage feast, whether Jews (formerly the most favoured people of God) or Greeks, (who were reckoned the most polite, or learned) or Barbarians, or Scythians: (who are esteemed the most cruel and ferocious of men) still these are called; Christ died for all. Calmet. — In S. Paul’s epistles, by the Greeks are usually designated the Gentiles. V.

Haydock Commentary Luke 12:13-31

  • Ver. 13. The inheritance. This man might think, that Jesus being the Messias, would act like a king and a judge. Wi. — Speak to my brother, &c. See in this the spirit of this world, at the very time Jesus is teaching disinterestedness, and the contempt of riches, he is interrupted by a man, who begs him to interfere in a temporal concern: deaf to every thing else, this man can think of his temporal interest only. Calmet. — He begged half an inheritance on earth; the Lord offered him a whole one in heaven: he gave him more than he asked for. S. Aug..
  • Ver. 14. Judge, &c. Our Saviour does not here mean to say that he or his Church had not authority to judge, as the Anabaptists foolishly pretend; for he was appointed by his Father, the King of kings, and the Lord and Judge of all. He only wished to keep himself as much detached as possible from worldly concerns: 1. Not to favour the opinion of the carnal Jews, who expected a powerful king for the Messias. 2. To shew that the ecclesiastical ministry was entirely distinct from political government, and that he and his ministers were sent not to take care of earthly kingdoms, but to seek after and prepare men for a heavenly inheritance. S. Ambrose, Euthymius, Ven. Bede.
  • Ver. 19. Much goods, &c. It is evident how far this poor man was mistaken, when he called these things goods, which with more reason ought to be esteemed evils. The only things that can rightly be called goods, are humility, modesty, and its other attendants. The opposite to these ought to be esteemed evils; and riches we ought to consider as indifferent. S. Chrys.
  • Ver. 22. Therefore I say to you, &c. Our Lord proceeds step by step in his discourse, to inculcate more perfect virtue. He had before exhorted us to guard ourselves against the fatal rocks of avarice, and then subjoined the parable of the rich man; thereby insinuating what folly that man is guilty of, who applies all his thoughts solely to the amassing of riches. He next proceeds to inform us that we should not be solicitous even for the necessities of life: wishing by this discourse to eradicate our wicked propensity to avarice. Theophy.
  • Ver. 29. And be not lifted up on high.[1] S. Aug. (l. ii. QQ. Evang. q. 29. t. 3, part 4, p. 257.) expounds it thus: do not value yourselves for the plenty and variety you have of things to eat. Others, by the Greek, look upon it as a metaphor, taken from meteors in the air, that appear high, and as it were in suspense whether to remain there or to fall down; so that they expound it: be not distracted and disturbed with various thoughts and cares how to live. Wi.