Daily Scripture Readings Saturday September 25 2010 25th Week in Ordinary Time

September 25 2010 Saturday Twenty Fifth Week in Ordinary Time
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Ecclesiastes 11:9—12:8
Douay-Rheims Challoner

Rejoice therefore, O young man, in thy youth,
and let thy heart be in that which is good in the days of thy youth,
and walk in the ways of thy heart, and in the sight of thy eyes:
and know that for all these God will bring thee into judgment.

Remove anger from thy heart, and put away evil from thy flesh.
For youth and pleasure are vain.

Remember thy Creator in the days of thy youth, before the time of affliction come,
and the years draw nigh of which thou shalt say: They please me not:

Before the sun, and the light, and the moon,
and the stars be darkened, and the clouds return after the rain:

When the keepers of the house shall tremble,
and the strong men shall stagger, and the grinders shall be idle in a small number,
and they that look through the holes shall be darkened:

And they shall shut the doors in the street, when the grinder’s voice shall be low,
and they shall rise up at the voice of the bird, and all the daughters of music shall grow deaf.

And they shall fear high things, and they shall be afraid in the way,
the almond tree shall flourish, the locust shall be made fat,
and the caper tree shall be destroyed:
because man shall go into the house of his eternity,
and the mourners shall go round about in the street.

Before the silver cord be broken, and the golden fillet shrink back,
and the pitcher be crushed at the fountain, and the wheel be broken upon the cistern,

And the dust return into its earth, from whence it was,
and the spirit return to God, who gave it.

Vanity of vanities, said Ecclesiastes, and all things are vanity.

Responsorial Psalm 89:3-6, 12-14 and 17 (Ps 90 NAB/Hebrew)
DR Challoner Text Only

Turn not man away to be brought low: and thou hast said:
Be converted, O ye sons of men.
For a thousand years in thy sight are as yesterday, which is past.
And as a watch in the night,
Things that are counted nothing, shall their years be.
In the morning man shall grow up like grass;
in the morning he shall flourish and pass away:
in the evening he shall fall, grow dry, and wither.
Can number thy wrath? So make thy right hand known:
and men learned in heart, in wisdom.
Return, O Lord, how long?
and be entreated in favour of thy servants.
We are filled in the morning with thy mercy:
and we have rejoiced, and are delighted all our days.
And let the brightness of the Lord our God be upon us:
and direct thou the works of our hands over us;
yea, the work of our hands do thou direct.

The Holy Gospel of Jesus Christ According to Saint Luke 9:43b-45
Haydock New Testament
Verse numbering varies.

And all were astonished at the mighty power of God: But while they all wondered at all the things he did, he said to his disciples:

Lay you up in your hearts these words: for it shall come to pass, that the Son of man shall be delivered into the hands of men.

But they understood not this word, and it was hid from them, so that they perceived it not. And they were afraid to ask him concerning this word.

Haydock Commentary Ecclesiastes 11:9—12:8
Notes Copied From Haydock Commentary Site

  • Ver. 9. Eyes. He speaks ironically, (C.) or exhorts to spiritual joy and moderation.  S. Greg. Mor. xxiv.
  • Ver. 10. Anger. All turbulent passions, and evil or carnal pleasures.  S. Jer.
  • ECCLESIASTES 12
  • CHAPTER XII.
  • Ver. 1. Not. Prevent old age, to procure a stock of virtues.  H. — Solomon refutes the former sentiments of the wicked, which he had perhaps once entertained.  C.
  • Ver. 2. Before the sun, &c.  That is, before old age: the effects of which upon all the senses and faculties are described in the following verses, under a variety of figures.  Ch. — All are exhorted to live well, before death come to deprive them of their senses and all helps: and to continue in expectation of judgment, the signs of which are given, as Matt. xxiv.  W.  S. Jer. — Rain. One misery succeeds another, the understanding is darkened, and the senses become dull.  C. — The Jews explain v. 2. 7. of the future distress of their nation under captivity.  S. Jer.  H.
  • Ver. 3. House. The sides, (S. Jer.) or rather the arms.  C. — Some understand prelates, or angels.  Thaumat. — And the powers that are in heaven shall be moved. Mar. xiii. 25.  H. — Men. The arms, (Chal.) or thighs, (Smith) or those who were formerly the most robust. — Number. The rest have been lost, and what remain are of little service for chewing meat.  C. — Holes. Spectacles, (Geier) as if they had been already in use.  C. — Heb. “windows.”  H.
  • Ver. 4. Doors. The lips, (C.) feet, (Chal.) nostrils, (Vat.) or the trachea and pulmonary arteries. — Bird. The cock-crowing; or at the least sound their slumbers are broken. — Deaf. Heb. “be low.”  The ears cannot enjoy music, nor can the voice of the old people please.  2 K. xix. 25.
  • Ver. 5. Way. They shall walk bent down, and afraid of rough ground. — Flourish. Their head shall become white, like the almond-flower.  Jer. i. 11. — Fat. Sept. “heavy.” — Destroyed. The hair shall fall off.  C. — Concupiscence shall be extinct.  Vat.  T. — Eternity. The body being consigned to the grave, and the soul to the region of spirits, to have no farther concern with the transactions of the world.  H.  Job vii. 9. — Street. This custom is often mentioned.  Herod. ii. 85.  Lu. vii. 32. — The women dance, having one (C.) or two old people disfigured in the midst of them, to recount the actions of the deceased.  Brun.
  • Ver. 6. Cord. The nerves. — Fillet. Veins, or the spermatic vessels, (C.) and the soul.  S. Jer. — Cistern. When the bladder, &c. become disordered.  Num. xxiv. 7.  C.
  • Ver. 7. It. Man is composed of two distinct parts; the destination of which we ought never to forget.  Thus the objection of infidels (c. iii. 19.) is refuted.  Plato and some of the ancients had the same idea of the soul’s spiritual nature; though some took it to be an aerial body.  C.
  • Ver. 8. Ecclesiastes. “The preacher.”  W. — He returns to his first proposition, and having pushed the objection of free-thinkers as far as possible, shews us what we ought to believe and practise.  He establishes the distinction of soul and body, the advantage of instruction, (v. 11.) without meddling with things too high, (v. 12.) the obligation of fearing God, (v. 13.) and future retribution.  v. 14.  This is the sum of all sound morality.  C.

Haydock Commentary Luke 9:44-45

  • Ver. 45. They understood not this word. They understood well enough what was meant by being delivered into the hands of his enemies, and being put to death; but they could not comprehend  how Jesus Christ, whom they knew to be the Messias, and the Son of God, and whom they believed to be immortal, and eternal, could suffer death, or affronts and outrages from men.  These ideas seemed incompatible; they perceived in them some mystery, which they could not penetrate.  Calmet.
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Sunday Scripture Readings September 26 2010 26th Sunday in Ordinary Time

September 26 2010 Twenty Sixth Sunday in Ordinary Time
Disclaimer – Official Readings of the Liturgy at – http://www.usccb.org/nab/

Amos 6:1a,4-7
Douay-Rheims Challoner

Woe to you that are wealthy in Sion; You that sleep upon beds of ivory, and are wanton on your couches: that eat the lambs out of the flock, and the calves out of the midst of the herd; You that sing to the sound of the psaltery: they have thought themselves to have instruments of music like David; That drink wine in bowls, and anoint themselves with the best ointments: and they are not concerned for the affliction of Joseph.

Wherefore now they shall go captive at the head of them that go into captivity: and the faction of the luxurious ones shall be taken away.

Responsorial Psalm 145:7, 8-9, 9-10 (Ps 146 NAB)
DR Challoner Text Only

Blessed is he
Who keepeth truth for ever:
who executeth judgment for them that suffer wrong:
who giveth food to the hungry.
The Lord looseth them that are fettered:

The Lord enlighteneth the blind.
The Lord lifteth up them that are cast down:
the Lord loveth the just.

The Lord keepeth the strangers,
he will support the fatherless and the widow:
and the ways of sinners he will destroy.

The Lord shall reign for ever:
thy God, O Sion, unto generation and generation.

1 Timothy 6:11-16
Haydock New Testament

But thou, O man of God, fly these things: and pursue justice, piety, faith, charity, patience, meekness. Fight the good fight of faith, lay hold on eternal life whereunto thou art called, and hast confessed a good confession before many witnesses.

I charge thee before God, who quickeneth all things, and before Christ Jesus, who gave testimony under Pontius Pilate, a good confession: That thou keep the commandment without spot, blameless, unto the coming of our Lord Jesus Christ: Which in his times he shall shew, who is the Blessed and only Mighy, the King of kings, and Lord of lords: Who only hath immortality, and inhabiteth light inaccessible, whom no man hath seen, nor can see: to whom be honour and empire everlasting. Amen.

The Holy Gospel of Jesus Christ According to Saint Luke 16:19-31
Haydock New Testament

There was a certain rich man, who was clothed in purple and fine linen: and feasted sumptuously every day. And there was a certain beggar, by name Lazarus, who lay at his gate, full of sores, Desiring to be filled with the crumbs that fell from the rich man’s table; and no one did give him: moreover, the dogs came and licked his sores.

And it came to pass that the beggar died, and he was carried by the Angels into Abraham’s bosom. And the rich man also died: and he was buried in hell. And lifting up his eyes when he was in torments, he saw Abraham afar off, and Lazarus in his bosom: And he cried, and said:

Father Abraham, have mercy on me, and send Lazarus, that he may dip the tip of his finger in water, to cool my tongue, for I am tormented in this flame.

And Abraham said to him:

Son, remember that thou didst receive good things in thy life-time, and likewise Lazarus evil things: but now he is comforted, and thou art tormented. And besides all this, between us and you there is fixed a great chaos: so that they who would pass from hence to you, cannot, nor from thence come hither.

And he said:

Then, Father, I beseech thee that thou wouldst send him to my father’s house: For I have five brethren, that he may testify to them, lest they also come into this place of torments.

And Abraham said to him:

They have Moses and the prophets; let them hear them.

But he said:

No, father Abraham; but if one went to them from the dead, they will do penance.

And he said to him:

If they hear not Moses and the prophets, neither will they believe if one rise again from the dead.

Haydock Commentary Amos 6:1a,4-7

  • Ver. 1. Wealthy. Sept. Syr. and Arab. “despisers of Sion.” Heb. also, “who hate Sion.” The prophecy wholly regards Israel. C.—It is a great crime for the rich to neglect the poor; but still more so, when wealthy clergymen shew no compassion for the spiritual or corporal wants of their neighbours. W.—State. Heb. “to whom the house of Israel comes” for judgment.
  • Ver. 4. Ivory, with which the beds for eating were adorned. v. 7. C.—Wanton. Heb. “stretch themselves out upon their,” &c. H.
  • Ver. 5. David. They think they excel him in music; but he consecrated his talent to a better purpose. C.—Sept. “they deemed them stable, and not fugitive things.” H.—They have placed their chief good in such pleasures. Theod. C.
  • Ver. 6. In bowls. Sept. “refined,” (H.) or cleared of the dregs.—Joseph, of their brethren, or they seem to have no share in the sufferings of mankind. Ps. lxxii. 5.
  • Ver. 7. Luxurious. Heb. “the feast of those who stretch themselves out, shall,” &c. Sept. “the neighing shall be removed from Ephraim.” His luste shall be punished. Jer. v. 8.—Some translate Heb. “the mourning of those who stretch themselves on their beds is at hand.” Others, “their funeral feast is distant.” None shall bewail their death. So ambiguous is the original. C.

Haydock Commentary 1 Timothy 6:11-16

  • Ver. 11. But thou, O man of God. This, says S. Chrys. is one of the highest titles and commendations that can be given to any man. So are called Samuel, Elias, Eliseus. 1 K. ii. and ix. 3 K. xxxiii. Wi.
  • Ver. 12. Fight the good fight. Lit. strive a good strife. S. Paul oftentimes brings this comparison of men striving for a prize.—And hast confessed a good confession before many witnesses, not only when baptized, not only when thou wast ordained a bishop, but by thy constancy and sufferings, and persecutions, says S. Chrys. though we know not the particulars. Wi.—Timothy had made profession of his faith at his baptism, at his ordination, and during the whole course of a life which, through many labours and persecutions, had been dedicated entirely to promote the faith. D. Thomas.—Like him let us also combat, if we aspire after the same triumph and prize.
  • Ver. 13. Under Pontius Pilate, &c. Some expound it of the words and particular testimony Christ gave when he said he was king, but not of this world, who came to teach the truth. We may rather understand it with others, of all Christ taught and suffered under Pilate, or whilst he was governor of Judea. Wi.
  • Ver. 14. That thou keep the commandment. Some understand that of fighting manfully; others of loving God; others rather comprehend all that S. Paul had commanded him, and all the instructions given.—Unto the coming of our Lord; which coming, he in due time will shew. This is the construction by the Greek. Wi.00This coming will be desirable for Christians who have preserved or recovered their baptismal innocence, and for pastors who have faithfully fulfilled their ministry; but terrible, in the extreme, for all who have lived in the constant neglect and omission of their duties.
  • Ver. 16. Who only hath immortality; i.e. is immortal of himself, and by his own nature.—Light inaccessible;

to human eyes or understandings. Wi.

Haydock Commentary Luke 16:19-31

  • Ver. 19. There was a certain rich man, &c. By this history of the rich man and Lazarus, he declares that those who are placed in affluent circumstances, draw upon themselves a sentence of condemnation, if seeing their neighbor in want, they neglect to succour him. S. Cyril, in Cat. Graec. Partum.—He that hath the substance of this world, and shall see his brother in need, and shut up his bowels against him, how doth the charity of God abide in him? John, 1 Ep. iii. 17. A received tradition of the Jews informs us, that this Lazarus was a beggar, then at Jerusalem, suffering in the most wretched condition of poverty, and infirmity: him our Saviour introduces, to manifest more plainly the truth of what he had been saying. S. Cyril, ut supra.—By this, we are not to understand that all poverty is holy, and the possession of riches criminal; but, as luxury is the disgrace of riches, so holiness of life is the ornament of poverty. S. Ambrose.—A man may be reserved and modest in the midst of riches and honours, as he may e proud and avaricious in the obscurity of a poor and wretched life.—Divers interpreters have looked upon this as a true history; but what is said of the rich man seeing Lazarus, of his tongue, or his finger, cannot be literal: souls having no such parts. Wi.—In this parable, which S. Ambrose takes to be a real fact, we have the name of the poor mendicant; but our Lord suppresses the name of the rich man, to signify that his name is blotted out of the book of life: besides, the rich man tells Abraham, that he has five brothers, who were probably still living; wherefore, to save their honour, our Lord named not their reprobated brother.
  • Ver. 22. Abraham’s bosom. The place of rest, where the souls of the saints resided, till Christ had opened heaven by his death. Ch.—It was an ancient tradition of the Jews, that the souls of the just were conducted by angels into paradise. The bosom of Abraham (the common Father of all the faithful) was the place where the souls of the saints, and departed patriarchs, waited the arrival of their Deliverer. It was thither that Jesus went after his death; as it is said in the Creed, “he descended into hell,” to deliver those who were detained there, and who might at Christs’s ascension enter into heaven. Calmet. See 1 Pet. iii. 19.—“Many shall come from the east and the west, and shall sit down with Abraham.” Matt. viii. 11.
  • Ver. 25. It appears from Philo, (de Execrat. p. 9, 37 b.) that the Jews not only acknowledged the existence of souls, and their state of happiness or misery after this life, but also that the souls of the saints and patriarchs interceded with God for their descendants, and obtained for them the succour they stood in need of. Calmet.
  • Ver. 26. Between us and you is fixed a great chaos, or gulf; i.e. God’s justice has decreed, that the bad should forever be separated from the good. We may here take notice that the Latin and Greek word, (v. 22) translated hell, even in the Prot. translation, cannot signify only the grave. Wi.
  • Ver. 27. If they hear not Moses, &c. We think that if we saw a man raised from the dead, who should tell us what he had seen and suffered in another world, it would make more impression upon us than past miracles, which we hear of, or the promises and threats of the prophets, apostles, and our blessed Saviour, which are contained in the Scripture; but it is a false notion, a vain excuse. The wicked, and unbelievers, would even in that case find pretexts and objections for not believing. S. Chrys. hom. iv.—They would say that the dead man was a phantom; that his resurrection was not real; his assertion nugatory. When Christ raised Lazarus from the dead, the miracle was known, evident and public, yet we find none of the Pharisees converted by it. They were even so mad as to enter into a design to kill Lazarus, to get rid of a witness who deposed against their incredulity. How many other miracles did he not perform in their sight, which they attributed to the prince of darkness, or to magic? Christ raised himself from the dead. This fact was attested by many unexceptionable witnesses. And what do the hardened Jews do? They object, that his disciples, stealing away the body, maliciously persuaded the people that he had risen again. Such is the corruption of the human heart, that when once delivered up to any passion, nothing can movie it. Every day we see or hear of malefactors publicly executed yet their example has no effect on the survivors, nor does it prevent the commissions of fresh crimes. Calmet.—“We have also the more firm prophetical word; whereunto you do well to attend, as to a light that shineth in a dark place, until the day dawn, and the day-star arise in your hearts.” 2 Pet. i. 19.—We may learn many very instructive lessons from this affecting history of Lazarus.—The rich may learn the dreadful consequences to be apprehended from riches, when made subservient to sensuality, luxury, and ambition. The poor may learn to make their poverty and sufferings however grievous the nature, instrumental to their future happiness, by bearing them with patience and resignation and resignation to the will of heaven. The former are taught that to expose a man to eternal misery, nothing more is required than to enjoy all the good things of this world according to their own will; the latter that however they may be despised and rejected of men, they may still have courage, knowing that the short day of this fleeting life, with all its apparent evils will soon be over; and that the day of eternity is fast approaching, when everyone shall receive according as he has done good or evil in his body.

Daily Scripture Readings Monday September 20 2010 Memorial of Saint Andrew Kim Taegŏn, priest and martyr, and Saint Paul Chŏng Hasang, martyr, and their companions, martyrs

September 20 2010 Monday
Memorial of Saint Andrew Kim Taegŏn, priest and martyr, and
Saint Paul Chŏng Hasang, martyr, and their companions, martyrs

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Proverbs 3:27-34
Douay-Rheims Challoner

Do not withhold him from doing good, who is able: if thou art able, do good thyself also.
Say not to thy friend: Go, and come again: and to morrow I will give to thee: when thou canst give at present.
Practise not evil against thy friend, when he hath confidence in thee.
Strive not against a man without cause, when he hath done thee no evil.
Envy not the unjust man, and do not follow his ways.
For every mocker is an abomination to the Lord, and his communication is with the simple.
Want is from the Lord in the house of the wicked: but the habitations of the just shall be blessed.
He shall scorn the scorners, and to the meek he will give grace.

Responsorial Psalm 14:2-5 (Ps 15 NAB)
DR Challoner Text Only

He that walketh without blemish,
and worketh justice:
He that speaketh truth in his heart,
who hath not used deceit in his tongue:
Nor hath done evil to his neighbour:
nor taken up a reproach against his neighbours.
In his sight the malignant is brought to nothing:
but he glorifieth them that fear the Lord.
He that sweareth to his neighbour, and deceiveth not;
He that hath not put out his money to usury,
nor taken bribes against the innocent:
He that doth these things, shall not be moved for ever.

The Holy Gospel of Jesus Christ According to Saint Luke 8:16-18
Haydock New Testament

Jesus said:

Now no man that lighteth a candle, covereth it with a vessel, or putteth it under a bed: but setteth it upon a candlestick, that they who come in, may see the light. For there is not any thing secret, that shall not be made manifest: nor hidden, that shall not be known, and come abroad. Take heed, therefore, how you hear. For whosoever hath, to him shall be given: and whosoever hath not, that also which he thinketh he hath, shall be taken away from him.

Haydock Commentary Proverbs 3:27-34
Notes Copied From Haydock Commentary Site

  • Ver. 27. Able. Prot. “withhold not good from them to whom it is due, when it is in the power of thine hand to do it.”  Relieve the distressed.  H. — They have a title to that wealth, since those who possess it are bound to relieve the indigent.  C. — Sept. “refrain not from doing good,” &c.  H.
  • Ver. 28. Present. Alms in season are doubly valuable.  W. — Antigonus acquired the title of Dwswn, “about to give,” as he never gave, (Plutarch) but only promised.
  • Ver. 30. Cause. We may defend ourselves; but herein great discretion is necessary.  C. — Cum pari contendere anceps est: cum superiore furiosum; cum inferiore sordidum. Senec. Prov.
  • Ver. 31. Ways. Of injustice.  Seek not to attain his prosperity by the same means.  C.
  • Ver. 33. Want. Heb. “a curse.” — Shall be. Heb. “he blesseth.”  H.
  • Ver. 34. Scorners. Lit. “he will delude the scorners.”  H. — He will treat them as they would treat others.  Ps. xvii. 27.  C. — Sept. “the Lord resisteth the proud,” &c.  So the apostles quote this passage.  1 Pet. v. 5.  Jam. iv. 6.  H.

Haydock Commentary Luke 8:16-18

  • Ver. 16. Our Lord calls himself the lighted candle, placed in the middle of the world.  Christ was by nature God, and by dispensation man: and thus, not unlike a torch placed in the middle of a house, does our Lord, seated in the soul of man, illumine all around him.  But by the candlestick, is understood the Church, which he illuminates by the refulgent rays of his divine word.  S. Maximus. By these expressions, Jesus induces his audience to be very diligent, and quite alive in the momentous affair of salvation; informing them that they are placed in the public view of the whole world.  S. Chry. hom. xv. in Matt.
  • Ver. 18. He here exhorts his audience to attend to what he was about to deliver, and to apply themselves with all their attention to the divine word; for he who has a desire of hearing the word, shall also receive the grace and power of understanding it.  But the man who has no desire of hearing it, though from his learning he might expect to understand it, shall not understand it, because he does not willingly attend to the divine admonitions; hence it is said, Whosoever hath, to him also shall be given. Ven. Bede.

Sunday Scripture Readings September 19 2010 25th Sunday in Ordinary Time

September 19 2010 Twenty Fifth Sunday in Ordinary Time
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Amos 8:4-7
from Douay-Rheims at SacredBible.org

Hear this, you that crush the poor, and make the needy of the land to fail, Saying: When will the month be over, and we shall sell our wares: and the sabbath, and we shall open the corn: that we may lessen the measure, and increase the sicle (shekel*), and may convey in deceitful balances, That we may possess the needy for money, and the poor for a pair of shoes, and may sell the refuse of the corn?

The Lord hath sworn against the pride of Jacob: surely I will never forget all their works.

1 Timothy 2:1-8 Haydock NT
Prayers are to be said for all men: because God wills the salvation of all.
Women are not to teach

I DESIRE, therefore, first of all, that supplications, prayers, intercessions, and thanksgivings, be made for all men: For kings, and for all who are in high station, that we may lead a quiet and peaceable life, in all piety and chastity. For this is good and acceptable in the sight of God, our Saviour, Who will have all men to be saved, and to come to the knowledge of the truth. For there is one God, and one mediator of God and men, the man Christ Jesus: Who gave himself a redemption for all, a testimony in due times: Whereunto I am appointed a preacher, and an apostle, (I say the truth, I lie not) a doctor of the Gentiles in faith and truth. I will, therefore, that men pray in every place, lifting up pure hands without anger and strife.

Luke 16:1-13 Haydock NT
CHAP. XVI
The parable of the unjust steward: of the rich man and Lazarus.

AND he said also to his disciples:

There was a certain rich man who had a steward: and the same was accused unto him, that he had wasted his goods. And he called him, and said to him:

‘How is it that I hear this of thee? Give an account of thy stewardship: for now thou canst be steward no longer.’

And the steward said within himself: ‘What shall I do, for my lord taketh away from me the stewardship? To dig I am not able: To beg I am ashamed. I know what I will do, that when I shall be put out of the stewardship, they may receive me into their houses.’

Therefore, calling together every one of his lord’s debtors, he said to the first: ‘How much dost thou owe my lord?’

But he said: ‘A hundred barrels of oil.’

And he said to him: ‘Take thy bill: and sit down quickly, and write fifty.’

Then he said to another: ‘And how much dost thou owe?’

Who said: ‘A hundred quarters of wheat.’

He said to him: ‘Take thy bill and write eighty.’

And the lord commended the unjust steward, forasmuch as he had done wisely: for the children of this world are wiser in their generation than the children of light.

And I say to you: Make to yourselves friends of the mammon of iniquity, that when you shall fail, they may receive you into everlasting dwellings. He that is faithful in that which is least, is faithful also in that which is greater: And he that is unjust in that which is little, is unjust in that which is greater. If then you have not been faithful in the unjust mammon, who will trust you with that which is the true? And if you have not been faithful in that which is another’s: who will give you that which is your own? No servant can serve two masters: for either you he will hate the one, and love the other; or he will hold to the one, and despise the other: you cannot serve God and mammon.

Haydock Commentary Amos 8:4-7

  • Ver. 5. Month: the first day was observed as a festival. Num. x. 10. H.—At the expiration of the month usurers demanded their money. Hor. i. sat. 3. Aristoph. Nub. ii. 1.—Corn,to sell after the sabbatical year, when it was dearest. Sabbath also denotes all “festivals.” These misers think that there are too many.—Sicle. Having a large measure to buy, and a small one to sell again. Deut. xxv. 13. Prov. xx. 10.
  • Ver. 6. Shoes, for almost nothing. Thus they forced the poor to serve, or to sell their effects.
  • Ver. 7. Jacob, because the rich despise the poor. It may also mean, that he swore by heaven or the temple, (Lev. xxvi. 19.) or that he would destroy the high places. C.

Haydock Commentary 1 Timothy 2:1-8

  • Ver. 1. Intercessions, as in the Prot. Translation. If men’s intercessions to God in favour of others, are no injury to Christ, as our mediator, how can it be any injury to Christ for the Angels and saints in heaven to pray or intercede to God for us? Wi.—S. Austin writes thus on this verse: By supplications are meant what are said before the consecration. By prayers, what are said in and after the consecration and communion, at mass, including the Pater Noster; which S. Jerome also says, our Lord taught his apostles to recite at the daily sacrifice of his body. l. iii. cont. Pelag. C. 5. By intercessions, what are said after the communion: and by thanksgivings, what both priest and people give to God for so great a mystery then offered and received. ep. 50. ad. Paulin. See S. Chrys. in hunc locum.
  • Ver. 2. For kings, who were then heathens, this being in Nero’s time. Wi.—Upon the happiness of the king generally depends that of his subjects. We pray for the emperors, says Tertullian, that God would grant them a long life, a secure throne, and a safe family, brave armies, a faithful council, and a just people. In fine, that he would grant them peace, and whatever else they could wish, either for themselves or their empire. Apologet. Cap. 30.
  • Ver. 4. All men to be saved. They contradict this, and other places of the Scripture, as well as the tradition and doctrine of the Catholic Church, who teach that God willeth only the salvation of the predestinated, of the elect, and as they say, of the first-begotten only: and that he died only for them, and not for all mankind. But if it is the will of God that all and every one be saved, and no one resists, or can frustrate the will of the Almighty, whence comes it that every one is not saved? To understand and reconcile divers places in the holy Scriptures, we must needs distinguish in God a will that is absolute and effectual, accompanied with the special graces and assistances, and with the gift of final perseverance, by which, through his pure mercy, he decreed to save the elect, without any prejudice to their free will and liberty; and a will, which by the order of Providence, is conditional, and this not a metaphorical and improper will only, but a true and proper will, by which he hath prepared and offered graces and means to all men, whereby they may work their salvation; and if they are not saved, it is by their own fault, by their not corresponding with the graces offered, it is because they resist the Holy Ghost. Acts vii. 51. If in this we meet with difficulties, which we cannot comprehend, the words of S. Paul, (Rom. ix. 20.) O man, who are thou, who repliest against God? May be sufficient to make us work our salvation with fear and trembling. Wi.
  • Ver. 5-6. One mediator of God and men, the man Christ Jesus: who gave himself a redemption for all. Take these words together, and we may easily understand in what sense the apostle calls our Saviour Christ, the one or only mediator; that is, he is the only mediator, who at the same time is our Redeemer; the only mediator who could mediate betwixt God, the person offended by sin, and men the offenders; the only mediator who reconciled God to mankind by his incarnation and death, by the infinite price of his blood, by his own merits, independently of the merits of any other. All Catholics allow that the dignity and office of mediator in this sense belongs only to our Redeemer, Jesus Christ, the Son of God, made man to save us. The sense then of this place is, that as there is but one God, who created all, so there is but one mediator, who redeemed all. But yet the name of mediator is not so appropriated to Christ, but that in an inferior and different sense the Angels and saints in heaven, and even men on earth, who pray to God for the salvation of others, may be called mediators, intercessors, or advocates; and we may apply ourselves to them to pray, interceded , and mediate for us, without any injury to Christ, since we acknowledge that all their intercession and mediation is always grounded on the merits of Christ, our Redeemer. The same word for mediator, in the Greek as well as in the Latin, is given to Moses, God’s servant. Gal. iii. 19. See also Deut. v. 5. The words of our Saviour himself, (Mat. xxiii.) taken according to the letter, contain an express prohibition of being called masters, or fathers; and this reason is given, because all men have one Father in heaven, and because Christians have one master, Christ. Yet no one can justly pretend from thence, that in a different sense, a man may not be called father or master, without any injury to God, or to Christ. Wi.—Christ is the one and only mediator of redemption; who gave himself, as the apostle writes, a redemption for all. He is also the only mediator, who stands in need of no other to recommend his petitions to the Father. But this is not against our seeking the prayers and intercessions, as well of the faithful upon earth, as of the saints and Angels in heave, for obtaining mercy, grace, and salvation, through Jesus Christ. As S. Paul himself often desired the help of the prayers of the faithful, without any injury to the mediatorship of Jesus Christ. Ch.—If there be other mediators among the Angels and saints, they are only so in subordination to the first, who by themselves have no right to mediation or favours, and who cannot demand them but through the merits of him who is our only essential mediator. Estius, Menoch. &c. Consult. Judg. iii. 9. 2 Esdras. ix 17. Acts vii. 35.—A redemption for all. Not only for the predestinate, not only for the just, not only for the faithful, but for all Gentiles and infidels: and therefore he says again, (c. iv. 10.) that Christ is the Saviour of all men, and especially of the faithful. See S. Aug. and S. Chrysostom. Wi.
  • Ver. 8. How beautifully does S. Paul teach that modesty and chastity are the greatest ornaments of the female sex, not only in the sight of God and of Angels, but also of men, who although by their own neglect they have not always grace and courage sufficient to be virtuous themselves, cannot help admiring virtue wherever they see it in others. Even the pagan fully acknowledges the native attractions of virtue. Virtus per se placet: Virtue pleases with unborrowed charms.

Haydock Commentary Luke 16:1-13

  • Ver. 1. There was a certain rich man, &c. By this parable, our Saviour advises his disciples to accompany their penitential works with deeds of mercy to the poor. Ven. Bede.—There is a certain erroneous opinion, that obtains pretty generally amongst mankind, and which tends to increase crimes, and to lessen good works: and this is, the foolish persuasion that men are not accountable to anyone, and that we can dispose as we please of the things in our possession. S. Chrys.—Whereas we are here informed, that we are only the dispensers of another’s property, viz. God’s. S. Amb.—When, therefore, we employ it not according to the will of our Master, but fritter and squander it away in pleasure, and in the gratification of our passions, we are, beyond all doubt, unjust stewards. Theophylactus.—And a strict account will be required of what we have thus dissipated, by our common Lord and Master. If then we are only stewards of that which we possess, let us cast from our minds that mean superciliousness and pride which the outward splendour of riches is so apt to inspire; and let us put on the humility, the modesty of stewards, knowing well that to whom much is given, much will be required. Abundance of riches makes not a man great, but the dispensing them according to the will and intention of his man great, but the dispensing them according to the will and intention of his employer. A.—The intention of this parable, is to shew what use each one ought to make of the goods which God has committed to his charge. In the three former parables, addressed to the murmuring Scribes and Pharisees, our Saviour shews with what goodness he seeks the salvation and conversion of a sinner; in this, he teaches how the sinner, when converted, ought to correspond to his vocation, and preserve with great care the inestimable blessing of innocence. Calmet.—A steward, &c. The parable puts us in mind, that let men be ever so rich or powerful in this world, God is still their master; they are his servants, and must be accountable to him how they have managed his gifts and favours; that is, all things they have had in this world. Wi.
  • Ver. 2. And he called him, &c. Such are the words which our Lord daily addresses to us. We daily see persons equally healthy, and likely to live as ourselves, suddenly summoned by death, to give an account of their stewardship. Happy summons to the faithful servant, who has reason to hope in his faithful administration. Not so to the unfaithful steward, whose pursuits are earthly: death to him is terrible indeed, and his exit is filled with sorrow. All thunderstricken at these words, “now thou canst be steward no long,” he says within himself, what shall I do! Ex. D. Thoma.
  • Ver. 8. And the lord commended, &c. By this we are given to understand, that if the lord of this unjust steward could commend him for his worldly prudence, though it were an overt act of injustice; how much more will the Almighty be pleased with those who, obedient to his command, seek to redeem their sins by alms-deeds? Ex. D. Thoma.—“Give alms out of thy substance,” says holy Toby to his son, “and turn not thy face from any poor person: for so it shall come to pass, that the face of the Lord shall not be turned from thee. According to thy abilities be merciful. If thou hast much, give abundantly; if thou hast little, take care, even of that little, to bestow willingly a little. For thus thou storest up to thyself a good reward, for the day of necessity. For alms deliver from sin, and from death, and will not suffer the soul to go into darkness.” Tob. iv. 7, 8, &c. Ibidem.—Children of this world, &c. are more prudent and circumspect as to what regards their temporal concerns, than they who profess themselves servants of God, are about the concerns of eternity.—Commended the unjust steward. Lit. the steward of iniquity: not for his cheating and injustice, but for his contrivances in favour of himself.—In their generation; i.e. in their concerns of this life. They apply themselves with greater care and pains, in their temporal affairs, than the children of light, whom God has favoured with the light of faith, do to gain heaven. Wi.
  • Ver. 9. Make to yourselves friends, &c. Not that we are authorized to wrong our neighbor, to give to the poor: evil is never to be done, that good may come from it. D. Thomas.—But we are exhorted to make the poor our friends before God, by relieving them with the riches which justly indeed belong to us, but are called the mammon of iniquity, because only the iniquitous man esteems them as riches, on which he sets his affections; whilst the riches of the virtuous are wholly celestial and spiritual. S. Aug. de quaest. Evang.—Of the mammon of iniquity. Mammon is a Syriac word for riches; and so it might be translated, of the riches of iniquity. Riches are called unjust, and riches of iniquity, not of themselves, but because they are many times the occasion of unjust dealings, and of all kind of vices. Wi.—Mammon signifies riches. They are here called the mammon of iniquity, because oftentimes ill-gotten, ill-bestowed, or an occasion of evil; and at the best are but worldly and false: and not the true riches of a Christian.—They may receive. By this we see, that the poor servants of God, whom we have relieved by our alms, may hereafter, by their intercession, bring our souls to heaven. Ch.—They may receive you into their eternal tabernacles. What a beautiful thought this! What a consolation to the rich man, when the term of his mortal existence is approaching, to think he shall have as many advocates to plead for his admittance into the eternal mansions of rest, as he has made friends among the poor by relieving their temporal wants. The rich give to the poor earthly treasures, the latter return in recompense eternal and infinite happiness. Hence we must infer, that the advantage is all on the side of the giver; according to the saying of our Lord, happier is the condition of him who gives, than of him who receives. A.
  • Ver. 10. He that is faithful in that which is least. This seems to have been a common saying, and that men judged of the honesty of their servants by their fidelity in lesser matters. For example, a master that sees his servant will not steal a little thing, judges that he will not steal a greater, &c.—And he that is unjust in that which is little, is unjust also in that which is greater. The interpreters take notice, that here temporal goods are called little, and spiritual goods are called greater; so that the sense is, that such men as do not make a right use of their temporal goods, in the service of God, will not make a good use of spiritual graces as they ought to do. See Maldonatus. Wi.
  • Ver. 11. If then you have not been faithful in the unjust mammon; i.e. in fading and false riches, which are the occasion of unjust and wicked proceedings.—Who will trust you with that which is the true? i.e. God will not intrust you with the true and spiritual riches of his grace. Wi.
  • Ver. 12. And if you have not been faithful in that which is another’s: so again is called false worldly wealth, which passeth from one to another; so that it cannot be called a man’s own, who will give you that which is your own? i.e. how can you hope that God will bestow upon you, or commit to your care, spiritual riches or gifts, which, when rightly managed, would be your own for all eternity? See S. Aug. l. ii. qq. Evang. q. 35. p. 263. Wi.—That which is another’s. Temporal riches may be said to belong to another, because they are the Lord’s; and we have only the dispensing of them: so that when we give alms, we are liberal of another’s goods. But if we are not liberal in giving what is another’s, how shall we be so in giving our own? Nothing one would have thought so properly belonged to the Jews, as the kingdom of heaven, the preaching of the gospel, and the knowledge of heavenly things. But they were deprived of all for their infidelity in the observance of the law, which was first intrusted to them. Calmet.
  • Ver. 13. No servant can serve two masters, &c. This is added to shew us, that to dispose of our riches according to the will of the Almighty, it is necessary to keep our minds free from all attachment to them. Theophylactus.—Let the avaricious man here learn, that to be a lover of riches, is to be an enemy of Christ. Ven. Bede.

Daily Scripture Readings Wednesday September 15 2010 Memorial of Our Lady of Sorrows

September 15 2010 Wednesday Memorial of Our Lady of Sorrows
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1 Corinthians 11:17-26, 33
Haydock New Testament

Now this I ordain: not praising you, that you come together not for the better, but for the worse. For first of all I hear, that when you come together in the church, there are divisions among you, and in part I believe it. For there must be also heresies: that they also, who are reproved, may be made manifest among you.

When you come together therefore into one place, it is not now to eat the Lord’s supper. For every one taketh before his own supper to eat. And one indeed is hungry, and another is drunk. What, have you not houses to eat and to drink in? Or despise ye the church of God, and put them to shame that have not? What shall I say to you? Do I praise you? In this I praise you not.

For I have received of the Lord that which also I delivered to you, that the Lord Jesus, the night in which he was betrayed, took bread, And giving thanks, broke, and said: Take ye, and eat: this is my body, which shall be delivered for you: do this for the commemoration of me. In like manner also the chalice, after he had supped, saying: This chalice is the new testament in my blood: this do ye, as often as you shall drink it for the commemoration of me. For as often as you shall eat this bread, and drink the chalice, you shall shew the death of the Lord until he come.

Wherefore, my brethren, when you come together to eat, wait for one another.

Responsorial Psalm 39:7- 10, 17 (Ps 40 NAB)
DR Challoner Text Only

Sacrifice and oblation thou didst not desire;
but thou hast pierced ears for me.
Burnt offering and sin offering
thou didst not require:
Then said I, Behold I come.
In the head of the book it is written of me
That I should do thy will:
O my God, I have desired it,
and thy law in the midst of my heart.
I have declared thy justice in a great church,
lo, I will not restrain my lips:
O Lord, thou knowest it.
Let all that seek thee
rejoice and be glad in thee:
and let such as love thy salvation say always:
The Lord be magnified.

The Holy Gospel of Jesus Christ According to Saint John 19:25-27
Haydock New Testament

Now there stood by the cross of Jesus, his mother, and his mother’s sister, Mary of Cleophas, and Mary Magdalene. When Jesus, therefore, saw his mother, and the disciple standing, whom he loved, he saith to his mother;

Woman, Behold thy son.

After that, he saith to the disciple;

Behold thy mother.

And from that house the disciple took her to his own.

OR
The Holy Gospel of Jesus Christ According to Saint Luke 2:33-35
Haydock New Testament

And his father and mother were wondering at these things which were spoken concerning him. And Simeon blessed them, and said to Mary, his mother:

Behold, this child is set for the ruin, and for the resurrection of many in Israel, and for a sign which shall be contradicted. And thy own soul a sword shall pierce, that out of many hearts thoughts may be revealed.

Haydock Commentary 1 Corinthians 11:17-26, 33
Notes Copied From Haydock Commentary Site

  • Ver. 17. Now this I ordain, &c.  S. Paul found that several abuses had crept in among the Corinthians at their Church meetings, where before the holy mysteries (though S. Chrys. thinks after them) they used to have those charitable suppers, called the Agape. For as our Saviour eat first a common supper with his apostles, before he instituted the holy sacrament, so the Christians in may places brought meats with them, and eat a supper together, in token of that friendship and union, which they had with all their brethren, before they began to celebrate the holy mysteries.  It is this supper, which according to the common interpretation S. Paul here (v. 20.) calls the Lord’s supper,[3] (though S. Aug. and some others by the Lord’s supper, understand the holy sacrament itself of Christ’s body and blood.)  The apostle tells them, he hears there are divisions among them at their meetings, which he says will happen, as there must be also heresies, which God permits, that they who are approved, may be made manifest, that is, that on such occasions, the just may shew their fidelity and constancy in their duty to God.  The apostle tells them, that it is not now to eat the Lord’s supper, that is, there were such abuses among them, that it was not now to imitate the supper, which Christ made with his apostles, or, according to the exposition of S. Aug. this was not becoming persons, who, before the end of their meetings, were to partake of the divine mysteries.  Wi.
  • Ver. 19. There must be also heresies: By reason of the pride and perversity of man’s heart; not by God’s will or appointment; who nevertheless draws good out of this evil, manifesting, by that occasion, who are the good and firm Christians, and making their faith more remarkable.  Ch. Not that God hath directly so appointed, as necessary: this originates in man’s malice, and his sole pride, and great abuse of free-will.  The providence of God draweth good out of evil, but wo to the man, says the Scripture, by whom scandal cometh, such as sects and heresies.  Hence S. Augustin, c. viii. de vera relig. says: “Let us use heretics not so as to approve their errors, but to make us more wary and vigilant, and more strenuous in defending Catholic doctrine against their deceits.”
  • Ver. 20. The Lord’s supper. So the apostle here calls the charity feasts observed by the primitive Christians; and reprehends the abuses of the Corinthians on these occasions: which were the more criminal, because these feasts were accompanied with the celebrating the eucharistic sacrifice and sacrament.  Ch.
  • Ver. 21. Every one taketh before his own supper to eat. The sense seems to be, that he took and brought with him, what he designed to eat with others, and give at that supper: but as soon as some were met (without staying for others, as he orders them, v. 33. when he again speaks of these suppers) the rich placing themselves together, began this supper, and did not take with them their poor brethren, who had brought nothing, or had nothing to bring; by this means, one indeed is hungry, and another is drunk, that is, had at least drunk plentifully, while the poor had nothing but shame, and confusion. By this means of eating and drinking without temperance and moderation, they were by no means disposed to receive afterwards the holy Eucharist.  He tells such persons that committed these disorders, that if they be so hungry that they cannot fast, they should eat (v. 34.) before they come from home.  We find these Agape forbidden to be made in the Churches, in the 28th canon of the council of Laodicea, a little before the general council of Nice.  In S. Chrys.’s time, and from the first ages, every one received the sacrament of the holy eucharist fasting, as it is probable this was one of the things which S. Paul gave orders about, (v. 34.) when he came to Corinth.  We must not imagine, that because Christ instituted the holy sacrament, and gave it to his apostles after he had supped with them, that the apostles, or the pastors of the Church, their successors, could not order it to be received fasting, and kneeling, for greater reverence and devotion.  See S. Aug. on this same subject, in his letter to Januarius, liv. tom. 2. part 2. p. 126. Nov. edit.  He says, that though it is evident that apostles did not receive the body and blood of Christ fasting, yet we must not on that account calumniate, or blame the universal Church, in which it is received only by those who are fasting.  He says, it is most insolent madness to dispute against what is a custom in the universal Church.  Wi.
  • Ver. 23. I have received from the Lord. That is, by revelation from Christ, as well as from others, who were present with him, that which also I delivered to you by word of mouth, &c.  Here he speaks of the holy sacrament itself, of the words of consecration, as the evangelists had done, and of the real presence of Christ’s body and blood. Which shall be delivered for you. In the common Greek copies, which is broken for you, to wit, on the cross. You shall shew the death of the Lord. As often as you receive, it shall be with a devout and grateful remembrance of his sufferings and death for your sake.  He puts every one in mind, that whosoever shall eat this bread, (v. 27.) so called from the outward appearances, or drink the chalice of the Lord unworthily, shall, by such a sacrilege, be guilty of the body and of the blood of the Lord. And (v. 29.) that he eateth, and drinketh judgment, or condemnation to himself, not discerning the difference betwixt celestial food and other meats, and not considering it to be truly the body of the Lord. See S. Chrys. hom. xxvii.  If the words of our Saviour, this is my body, &c. were to be understood in a metaphorical and figurative sense only, is it probable that S. Paul, writing twenty-four years afterwards, to the new converted Gentiles at Corinth, would have used words, which full as clearly express a true and real presence of Christ’s body in the eucharist, without one word to signify that this was to be understood in a figurative sense only? Wi.
  • Ver. 24. Juvenius, a native of Spain, and a priest, who flourished under Constantine the Great, about the year 329, has left us the life of Christ in hexameter verse, where speaking of the institution of the eucharist, he says, “Christ taught his disciples, that he delivered to them his own body;” and when he gave them the chalice, “he taught them that he had distributed to them his blood: and said, this blood remits the sins of the people: drink this, it is mine.”  Bibl. Max. P. P. T. iv. p. 74.
    • Discipulos docuit proprium se tradere corpus,
    • Edocuitque suum se divisisse cruorem.
    • Atque ait: Hic sanguis populi delicta remittit:
    • Hunc potate meum.

Haydock Commentary John 19: 25-27

  • Ver. 25. There stood by the cross . . . his mother. And so near to him, that from the cross he both spoke to her, and also to S. John.  Wi.
  • Ver. 26. Though there were other holy women standing by the cross, he takes notice of none but his mother, teaching us, by this, what we owe to our parents.  For although it is our duty to disown them, when they place obstacles in our way to salvation; yet when they do not thus impede us, we owe every thing to them, and must prefer them to all.  S. Chrys. hom. lxxxiv. in Joan. We learn also here, what should be our respect and confidence in this Virgin Mother, so highly honoured by her divine Son.
  • Ver. 27. The disciple took her to his own[1] home, or into his own are, not for his mother, by the Greek expression.  See S. Chrys. and S. Aug.  Wi.

Haydock Commentary Luke 2:33-35

  • Ver. 33. In the Greek, Joseph and the mother of Jesus. V.
  • Ver. 34. Is set for the ruin. Christ came for the redemption and salvation of all men: but Simeon prophesies what would happen in consequence of the wilful blindness and obstinacy of many. Wi. Not that God sent his Son for the fall of any man; but that many, by their own perverseness, in wilfully refusing to receive and obey him, would take occasion of falling.  Ch. And for a sign which shall be contradicted, to signify that Christ, and his doctrine, should be as it were a mark, or butt, against whom the Jews should discharge the arrows and darts of their malice.  Wi. Hence S. Paul, (2 Cor. ii. 16.) We are to one the odour of death unto death, but to the other the odour of life unto life.
  • Ver. 35. And thy own soul a sword shall pierce. These words, which figuratively express the grief of the blessed Virgin mother, when present at the death of her Son, are to be taken by way of a parenthesis. That out of many hearts thoughts may be revealed, and these are to be joined with what went before; to wit, that child shall be a sign of contradiction, set unto the fall and resurrection of many, that the thoughts of many hearts may be revealed and disclosed; when some shall believe, and others remain in their obstinacy.  Wi. Bede, and many others, understand this of the sharp sorrow, which wounded the soul of the blessed Virgin Mary, at the time of Christ’s passion.  Barradius. Carthusianus and Jansenius explain this passage as follows: Behold, this child is placed for a sign that shall be contradicted, which as a sword of most poignant grief will pierce thy soul, O Virgin!  But Christ shall be contradicted, that the thoughts of the Jews may be revealed from many hearts, and it may appear who among them are good, and who are wicked and hypocrites.  Barradius.

Sunday Scripture Readings September 12 2010 24th Sunday in Ordinary Time

September 12 2010 Twenty Fourth Sunday in Ordinary Time
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Exodus 32:7-14
Douay-Rheims Challoner

And the Lord spoke to Moses, saying:

Go, get thee down: thy people, which thou hast brought out of the land of Egypt, hath sinned. They have quickly strayed from the way which thou didst shew them: and they have made to themselves a molten calf, and have adored it, and sacrificing victims to it, have said: These are thy gods, O Israel, that have brought thee out of the land of Egypt.

And again the Lord said to Moses:

I see that this people is stiffnecked: Let me alone, that my wrath may be kindled against them, and that I may destroy them, and I will make of thee a great nation.

But Moses besought the Lord his God, saying:

Why, O Lord, is thy indignation enkindled against thy people, whom thou hast brought out of the land of Egypt, with great power, and with a mighty hand? Let not the Egyptians say, I beseech thee: He craftily brought them out, that he might kill them in the mountains, and destroy them from the earth: let thy anger cease, and be appeased upon the wickedness of thy people. Remember Abraham, Isaac, and Israel, thy servants, to whom thou sworest by thy own self, saying: I will multiply your seed as the stars of heaven: and this whole land that I have spoken of, I will give to your seed, and you shall possess it for ever:

And the Lord was appeased from doing the evil which he had spoken against his people.

1 Timothy 1:12-17
Haydock NT

I give thanks to him who hath strengthened me, Christ Jesus our Lord, that he deemed me faithful, putting me in the ministry: Who before was a blasphemer, and a persecutor, and contumelious: but I obtained the mercy of God, because I did it ignorantly in unbelief.

Now the grace of our Lord hath abounded exceedingly with faith and love, which is in Christ Jesus. A faithful saying, and worthy of all acceptation: that Christ Jesus came into this world to save sinners, of whom I am the chief. But for this cause have I obtained mercy: that in me first Christ Jesus might shew forth all patience, for the information of those who shall believe in him unto life everlasting. Now to the king of ages, immortal, invisible, the only God, be honour and glory for ever and ever. Amen.

The Holy Gospel of Jesus Christ According to Saint Luke 15:1-32
Haydock New Testament

NOW the publicans and sinners drew near unto him, to hear him. And the Pharisees and the Scribes murmured, saying:

This man receiveth sinners, and eateth with them.

And he spoke to them this parable, saying:

What man among you that hath a hundred sheep, and if he shall lose one of them, doth he not leave the ninety-nine in the desert, and go after that which is lost until he find it? And when he hath found it, doth he not lay it upon his shoulders rejoicing: And coming home call together his friends and neighbors, saying to them: Rejoice with me, because I have found my sheep that was lost?

I say to you, that even so there shall be joy in heaven upon one sinner that doth penance, more than upon ninety-nine just who need not penance. Or what woman, having ten groats, if she lose one groat, doth not light a candle and sweep the house, and seek diligently, till she find it? And when she hath found it, call together her friends and neighbours, saying:

Rejoice with me, because I have found the groat which I had lost.

So I say to you, there shall be joy before the Angels of God upon one sinner doing penance.

And he said:

A certain man had two sons: And the younger of them said to his father:

Father, give me the portion of substance that falleth to me.

And he divided until them his substance. And not many days after, the younger son gathering all together, went abroad into a far country: and there wasted his substance by living riotously. And after he had spent all, there came a might famine in that country, and he began to be in want. And he went, and joined himself to one of the citizens of that country. And he sent him into his farm to feed swine. And he would fain have filled his belly with the husks the swine did eat: and no man gave unto him. And returning to himself, he said:

How many hired servants in my father’s house have plenty of bread, and I here perish with hunger? I will arise, and will go to my father, and say to him: ‘Father, I have sinned against heaven, and before thee: I am not now worthy to be called thy son: make me as one of thy hired servants.’

And rising up, he went to his father. And when he was yet a great way off, his father saw him, and was moved with compassion, and running to him, fell upon his neck and kissed him. And the son said to him:

Father, I have sinned against heaven and before thee: I am not now worthy to be called thy son.

But the father said to his servants:

Bring forth, quickly, the first robe, and put it on him, and put a ring on his hand, and shoes on his feet: And bring hither the fatted calf, and kill it, and let us eat and make merry: Because this, my son, was dead, and is come to life again: he was lost and is found.

And they began to be merry. Now his elder son was in the field: and when he came and drew nigh to the house, he heard music and dancing: And he called one of the servants, and asked what these things meant. And he said to him:

Thy brother is come, and thy father hath killed the fatted calf, because he hath received him safe.

And he was angry, and would not go in. His father, therefore, coming out, began to entreat him. And he answering, said to his father:

Behold, for so many years do I serve thee, and I have never transgressed thy commandment, and yet thou hast never given me a kid to make merry with my friends: But as soon as this, thy son, is come, who hath devoured his substance with harlots, thou hast killed for him the fatted calf.

But he said to him:

Son, thou art always with me, and all I have is thine. But it was fit that we should make merry and be glad, for this, thy brother, was dead, and is come to life again: he was lost, and is found.

Haydock Commentary Exodus 32:7-14

  • Ver. 7. Thy people. They are not worthy to be styled my people; and thou didst ratify the covenant with me, in their name, and as their interpreter. They have sinned, giving way to idolatry in thought, word, and deed.
  • Ver. 9. And again. The Sept. omit this verse. Moses, at the first intimation of the people’s sin, fell prostrate before the Lord, to sue for pardon, and pleaded the natural weakness of an ungovernable multitude, in order to extenuate their fault. This God admits.—I see, &c. But while he seems bent on punishing them, to try his servant, he encourages him inwardly to pray with fervour. Salien.
  • Ver. 10. Alone One fully determined on revenge will bear with no expostulation; whence S. Greg. (Mor. ix. 11,) and Theodoret (q. 67,) look upon this as an incitement to pray more earnestly, seeing God’s servants have such influence over Him. The mercy of God struggled with his justice, and stopped its effects.—Nation, as I promised to Abraham; or I will make thee ruler over a nation greater than this, as Moses explains it, (Deut. ix. 14,) and as the like offer is made, Num. xiv. 12. The Sam. Subjoins here, “And God was likewise much irritated against Aaron, and would have destroyed him; but Moses prayed for him:” which we are assured was the case. Deut. ix. 20. C.
  • Ver. 11. Why, &c. Calvin here accuses Moses of arrogance, in prescribing laws to God’s justice. But S. Jerome (ep. ad Gaud.) commends his charity and “prayer, which hindered God’s power.” W.
  • Ver. 12. Craftily. Heb. “with a malicious design.” Moses insinuates, that the glory of God is interested not to punish the Hebrews, lest the Gentiles should *plaspheme, particularly as the land of Chanaan seemed to be promised unconditionally to the posterity of Abraham, who were now, all but one, to be exterminated. H.
  • Ver. 13. Thy servants. Thus God honours his friends, and rewards their merits, which are the effects of his grace. W.
  • Ver. 14. Appeased. Yet of this Moses was not fully assured, and in effect only those who had been less guilty, were reprieved to be punished afterwards. V. 30. 35. H.

Haydock Commentary 1 Timothy 1:12-17

  • Ver. 13. Because I did it ignorantly in unbelief, or in incredulity. Not that we can think it an invincible and altogether an inculpable ignorance, such as would have made S. Paul blameless in the sight of God. It was through his pure mercy that he called S. Paul, when his great sins and false zeal made him a greater object of the divine mercy: and God in him was pleased to make known to all men his wonderful patience, that no sinners might despair. The grace of God was superabounding, or exceedingly abundant in him. Wi.
  • Ver. 15. Christ Jesus, the true Son of God, came into this world to save sinners, of whom (says S. Paul) I am the chief, the first, the greatest. Wi.

Haydock Commentary Luke Chapter 15

  • Ver. 4. What man, &c. Christ left the ninety-nine in the desert, when he descended from the angelic choirs, in order to seek last man on the earth, that he might fill up the number of the sheepfold of heaven, from which his sins had excluded him. S. Amb.—Neither did his affection for the last sheep make him behave cruelly to the rest; for he left them in safety, under the protection of his omnipotent hand. S. Cyril ex D. Thoma Aquin.
  • Ver. 7. Joy in heaven, &c. What incitement ought it not to be to use to practise virtue, when we reflect that our conversion causes joy to the troops of blessed spirits, whose protection we should always seek, and whose presence we should always revere. S. Amb.—There is greater joy for the conversion of a sinner, than for the perseverance of the just; but it frequently happens, that these being free from the chain of sin, remain indeed in the path of justice, but press not on eagerly to their heavenly country; whilst such as have been sinners, are stung with grief at the remembrance of their former transgressions, and calling to mind how they have forsaken their God, endeavour by present fervour to compensate for their past misconduct. But it must be remembered that there are many just, whose lives cause such joy to the heavenly court, that all the penitential exercises of sinners cannot be preferred before them. S. Gregory, hom. xxxiv.
  • Ver. 8. In the preceding parable, the race of mankind is compared to a lost sheep, to teach us that we are the creatures of the most high God, who made us, and not we ourselves, of whose pasture we are the sheep. Ps. xcix. And in this parable mankind are compared to the drachma, which was lost, to shew us that we have been made to the royal likeness and image even of the omnipotent God; for the drachma is a piece of money, bearing the image of the king. S. Chrysos. In S. Tho. Aquin.
  • Ver. 10. Before the angels. By this it is plain that the spirits in heaven have a concern for us below, and a joy at our repentance, and consequently a knowledge of it. Ch.
  • Ver. 11. A certain man had two sons. By the elder son is commonly expounded the Jewish people, who for a long time had been chosen to serve God; and by the younger son, the Gentiles, who for so many ages had run blindly on in their idolatry and vices. Wi.—Some understand this of the Jews and Gentiles, others of the just and sinners. The former opinion seems preferable. The elder son, brought up in his father’s house, &c. represents the Jews; the younger prodigal is a figure of the Gentiles. Calmet.
  • Ver. 12. It is very probable, from this verse, that the children of the family, when come to age, could demand of their parents the share of property which would fall to their lot. For these parables suppose the ordinary practices of the country, and are founded on what was customarily done. Grotius thinks this was the common law among the Phoenicians.—The Gentiles, prefigured by the prodigal son, received from their father, (the Almighty,) free-will, reason, mind, health, natural knowledge, and the goods which are common to mankind, all which they dissipated and abused. Sinners who have besides received the gift of faith and sanctification, by baptism, and who have profaned the holiness of their state, by crimes, are more express figures of the bad conduct of this son. Calmet.
  • Ver. 16. Husks. This expresses the extreme misery of his condition. There is no need of seeking any other mystery in this world. Horace, by a kind of hyperbole, (B. ii, Ep. 1) represents the miser as living upon husks, to be able to save more.
    Vivit silquis et pane secundo.
    –And no man gave unto him;
    i.e. gave him bread, mentioned before; for as for the husks, he could take what he pleased. Wi.
  • Ver. 18. How merciful is the Almighty, who, though so much offended, still does not disdain the name of father.—I have sinned. These are the first words of a sinner’s confession to the author of nature. God knows all things; still does he expect to hear the voice of your confession. It is in vain to think of concealing your sins from the eyes of him whom nothing can escape; and there can be no danger of acknowledging to him what his infinite knowledge has already embraced. Confess then that Christ may intercede for you, the Church pray for you, the people our forth their tears for you. Fear not that you cannot obtain pardon, for pardon is promised to you; grace, and a reconciliation with a most tender parent, are held out to you. S. Ambrose.—Before thee, &c. By this does our Redeemer shew, that the Almighty is here to be understood by the name of father: for the all-seeing eye of God only beholds all things, from whom even the secret machinations of the heart cannot be concealed. S. Chrys. ex D. Tho.
  • Ver. 22. The first; i.e. the best robe: by it, is meant the habit of grace. Wi.
  • Ver. 24. Was dead, and is come to life again. A sinner, in mortal sin, is deprived of the divine grace, which is the spiritual life of the soul. At his conversion it is restored to him, and he begins to live again. Wi.
  • Ver. 25. His elder son, &c. We have already remarked, that this son represents the Jews. He boasts of having always served his father faithfully, and of never disobeying him. This is the language of that presumptuous people, who believe themselves alone holy; and despising the Gentiles with sovereign contempt, could not bear to see the gates of salvation laid open also to them. The 28th, 29th, and 30th verses express admirably the genius of the Jewish people; particularly his refusing to enter his father’s house, shews their obstinacy. Calmet.
  • Ver. 29. I have never transgressed, &c. With what face could the Jews, represented here by the eldest son, say they had never transgressed the commandments of their father? This made Tertullian think that this was not the expression of the Jews, but of the faithful Christians; and, therefore, he interprets the whole parable as applied to a disciple of Christ. But we should recollect, that it is not uncommon for the presumption to boast of what it never has done. The whole history of the Jews is full of numberless details of their prevarication and disobedience. Calmet.—A kid, &c. The Jews demanded a kid, but the Christians a lamb; therefore was Barabbas set at liberty for them, whilst for us the lamb was immolated. S. Amb.

Daily Scripture Readings Saturday September 11 2010 23rd Week in Ordinary Time

September 11 2010 Saturday Twenty Third Week in Ordinary Time
Disclaimer – Official Readings of the Liturgy at – http://www.usccb.org/nab/

1 Corinthians 10:14-22
Haydock New Testament

Wherefore, my dearly beloved, flee from the service of idols. I speak as to wise men: judge ye yourselves what I say. The chalice of benediction which we bless, is it not the communion of the blood of Christ? And the bread which we break, is it not the partaking of the body of the Lord? For we being many, are one bread, one body, all who partake of one bread. Behold Israel, according to the flesh; are not they, who eat of the sacrifices, partakers of the altar?

What then? Do I say, that what is offered in sacrifice to idols, is any thing? Or that the idol is any thing? But the things which the heathens sacrifice, they sacrifice to devils, and not to God. And I would not that you should be made partakers with devils: you cannot drink the chalice of the Lord, and the chalice of devils: You cannot be partakers of the table of the Lord, and of the table of devils. Do  we provoke the Lord to jealousy? Are we stronger than he? All things are lawful for me, but all things are not expedient.

Responsorial Psalm 115:3-4, 8-9
(Ps 116:12-13, 17-18 NAB)
DR Challoner Text Only

What shall I render to the Lord,
for all the things that he hath rendered to me?
I will take the chalice of salvation;
and I will call upon the name of the Lord.
I will sacrifice to thee the sacrifice of praise,
and I will call upon the name of the Lord.
I will pay my vows to the Lord
in the sight of all his people:

The Holy Gospel of Jesus Christ According to Saint Luke 6:43-49
Haydock New Testament

Jesus said:

For there is no good tree that bringeth forth evil fruit: nor an evil tree that bringeth forth good fruit. For every tree is known by its fruit. For men do not gather figs from thorns: nor from a bramble bush do they gather grapes. A good man, out of the good treasure of his heart, bringeth forth that which is good: and an evil man, out of the evil treasure, bringeth forth that which is evil. For out of the abundance of the heart the mouth speaketh.

And why call you me Lord, Lord: and do not the things which I say? Every one that cometh to me, and heareth my words, and doth them: I will she you to whom he is like. He is like to a man building a house, who digged deep, and laid the foundation upon a rock. And when a flood came, the stream beat vehemently upon that house, and it could not shake it: for it was founded on a rock. But he that heareth, and doth not: is like to a man building his house upon the earth without a foundation: against which the stream beat vehemently, and immediately it fell: and the ruin of that house was great.

Haydock Commentary 1 Corinthians 10:14-22
Notes Copied From Haydock Commentary Site

  • Ver. 14. There are various kinds of idolatry.  It is the perfection of Angels never to err: it is a human imperfection to fall into error, but a diabolical crime, so to love our error, as to divide the Church by schism, or leave it by heresy: this love of self is the most dangerous idolatry.
  • Ver. 16. The chalice of benediction,[2] &c.  Which the priests bless or consecrate, is it not the communion of the blood of Christ?  And the bread which we break, (so called because of the outward appearance of bread) is it not the partaking or communion of the body of the Lord? See S. Chrys. here, hom. xxiv. p. 396. and p. 400.  See also the Annotations, Matt. xxvi. 26.  Wi. Here the apostle puts them in mind of the partaking of the body and blood of Christ in the sacred mysteries, and becoming thereby one mystical body with Christ.  From whence he infers, (v. 21.) that they who are made partakers with Christ, by the eucharistic sacrifice, and sacrament, must not be made partakers with devils, by eating of the meats sacrificed to them.  Ch.
  • Ver. 17. We being many, are one bread. Or, as it  may be rendered, agreeably both to the Latin and Greek, because the bread is one, all we, being many, are one body, who partake of that one bread. For it is by our communicating with Christ and with one another, in this blessed Sacrament, that we are formed into one mystical body; and made, as it were, one bread, compounded of many grains of corn, closely united together.  Ch. From the sacrament of the real body of Christ in the eucharist, he passeth to the effect of this sacrament, which is to unite all those who partake of it, as members of the same mystical body of Christ, which is his Church: and from hence he presently draws this consequence, that such as are members of that body, of which Christ is the head, cannot have any communication with idolaters, or with those that offer sacrifices to idols and devils.  Wi.
  • Ver. 18. Behold Israel, according to the flesh. That is, the people that were the offspring of Israel or Jacob.  Are not these they who offered sacrifices to the true God, and eat or the sacrifices, which were offered on his altars, and by offering to him such sacrifices, acknowledged him to be their God, and the only true God: and so you, if you partake, and eat of the sacrifices of idolaters, and of what they tell you was offered to their idols, you seem at least, to join with them in acknowledging, and paying reverence to their idols, which are devils: and you cannot be partakers of the table of the Lord, and of the table of devils. Co we provoke the Lord to jealousy? that is, how dare we provoke our Lord, who is a jealous God, and will admit of no rival, by partaking of sacrifices offered to false gods? how dare we thus contemn his power, as if we were stronger than he, or that he could not punish us? Wi.
  • Ver. 19. What then? do I say, &c.  He puts this objection, as if it were contradictory to what he had taught before, (c. viii. v. 4.) that an idol is nothing, &c. but he answers this objection by saying that all things, that is, all meats are lawful in themselves, but not always expedient, nor edifying, when they give scandal to weak brethren, or when the infidels themselves think that such as eat things offered to idols, join with them in honouring their idols.  Wi. The meaning of this passage is: whilst I advise you to abstain from eating of any thing consecrated to idols, I do not advise you as supposing that these offerings have any power in themselves to defile your souls, in the same manner as by eating of the body and blood of Christ we receive strength to overcome our spiritual enemies.  S. Paul here anticipates an objection that might be made by some to whom he was writing.  Est.
  • Ver. 21. In all this discourse, a comparison is instituted between the Christian host and oblation, its effects, conditions and properties, with the altars, hosts, sacrifices and immolations of the Jews and Gentiles; which the apostle could not have done, had there not been a proper sacrifice in the Christian worship.  The holy Fathers teach the same with the ancient Councils.  This in the council of Nice: The lamb of God laid upon the altar. Conc. Ephes.  The unbloody service of the sacrifice. In S. Cyril Alex. in Conc. Ephes. Anath. 11.  The quickening holy sacrifice; the unbloody host and victim. Tertul. de coron. milit. The propitiatory sacrifice both for the living and the dead. This Melchisedech did most singularly prefigure in his mystical oblation of bread and wine; this also according to the prophecy of Malachy, shall continue from the rising to the setting sun, a perpetual substitute for all the Jewish sacrifices; and this, in plain terms, is called the Mass, by S. Augustin, Serm. ccli. 91.  Conc. Cartha. ii. c. 3. 4. c. 84. Milevit. 12.  S. Leo, ep. 81. 88. c. 2.  S. Gregory, l. ii. ep. 9. 92. &c. &c.  See next chap. v. 24.

Haydock Commentary Luke 6:43-49

  • Ver. 48. That man buildeth safely who hath both faith and good works; whereas the man that trusteth to his faith alone, to his reading or knowledge of Scripture, and doth not work and live accordingly, buildeth on sand.  B.

Catena Aurea Luke 6:43-49
From Catechetics Online

  • THEOPHYL; Our Lord continues the words which He had begun against the hypocrites, saying, For a good tree brings not forth corrupt fruit; i.e. as if He says, If you would have a true and unfeigned righteousness, what you set forth in words make up also in works, for the hypocrite though he pretends to be good is not good, who does evil works; and the innocent though he be blamed, is not therefore evil, who does good works.
  • TITUS BOS. But take not these words to thyself as an encouragement to idleness, for the tree is moved conformably to its nature but you have the exercise of free will; and every barren tree has been ordained for some good, but you were created to the good work of virtue.
  • ISIDORE PELEUS; He does not then exclude repentance, but a continuance in evil, which as long as it is evil cannot bring forth good fruit, but being converted to virtue, will yield abundance. But what nature is to the tree, our affections are to us. If then a corrupt tree cannot bring forth good fruit, how shall a corrupt heart?
  • CHRYS. But although the fruit is caused by the tree, yet, it brings to us the knowledge of the tree, because the distinctive nature of the tree is made evident by the fruit, as it follows, For every tree is know by its fruit.
  • CYRIL; Each man’s life also will be a criterion of his character. For not by extrinsic ornaments and pretended humility is the beauty of true happiness discovered, but by those things which a man does; of which he gives an illustration, adding, For of thorns men do not gather figs.
  • AMBROSE; On the thorns of this world the fig cannot be found, which as being better in its second fruit, is well fitted to be a similitude of the resurrection. Either because, as you read, The fig trees have put forth their green figs, that is, the unripe and worthless fruit came first in the Synagogue. Or because our life is imperfect in the flesh, perfect in the resurrection, and therefore we ought to cast far from us worldly cares, which eat into the mind and scorch up the soul, that by diligent culture we may obtain the perfect fruits. This therefore has reference to the world and the resurrection, the next to the soul and the body, as it follows, Nor of a bramble bush gather they grapes. Either because no one living in sin obtains fruit to his soul, which like the grape nearest the ground is rotten, on the higher branches becomes ripe. Or because no one can escape the condemnations of the flesh, but he whom Christ has redeemed, Who as a grape hung on the tree.
  • THEOPHYL; Or, I think the thorns and bramble are the cares of the world and the prickings of sin, but the figs and the grapes are the sweetness of a new life and the warmth of love, but the fig is not gathered from the thorns nor the grape from the bramble, because the mind still debased by the habits of the old man may pretend to, but cannot bring forth the fruits of the new man. But we must know, that as the fruitful palm tree is enclosed and supported by a hedge, and the thorn bearing fruit not its own, preserves it for the use of man, so the words and acts of the wicked wherein they serve the good are not done by the wicked themselves, but by the wisdom of God working upon them.
  • CYRIL; But having shown that the good and the bad man may be discerned by their works as a tree by its fruits, he now sets forth the same thing by another figure, saying, A good man out of the good treasure of his heart brings forth that which is good, and the evil man out of the evil treasure brings forth that which is evil.
  • THEOPHYL; The treasure of the heart is the same as the root of the tree. He therefore who has in his heart the treasure of patience and perfect love, brings forth the best fruits, loving his enemy, and doing the other things which have been taught above. But he who keeps a bad treasure in his heart does the contrary to this.
  • BASIL; The quality of the words shows the heart from which they proceed, plainly manifesting the inclination of our thoughts. Hence it follows, For out of the abundance of the heart the mouth speaks.
  • CHRYS. For it is a natural consequence when wickedness abounds within, that wicked words are breathed as far as the mouth; and therefore when you hear of a man uttering abominable things, do not suppose that there lies only so much wickedness in him as is expressed in his words, but believe the fountain to be more copious than the stream.
  • THEOPHYL; By the speaking of the mouth the Lord signifies all things, which by word, or deed, or thought, we bring forth from the heart. For it is the manner of the Scripture to put words for deeds.
  • THEOPHYL; Lest any one should vainly flatter himself with the words, Out of the abundance of the heart the mouth speaks, as if words only and not rather works were required of a Christian, our Lord adds the following, But why call you me Lord, Lord, and do not the things which I say? As if He said, Why do you boast of sending forth the leaves of a right confession, and show forth no fruit of good works.
  • CYRIL; But Lordship both in name and reality belongs only to the Highest Nature.
  • ATHAN. This is not then the word of man, but the Word of God, manifesting His own birth from the Father, for He is the Lord Who is born of the Lord alone. But fear not the duality of Persons, for they are not separate in nature.
  • CYRIL; But the advantage which arises from the keeping of the commandments, or the loss from disobedience, he shows as follows; Whosoever comes to me, and hears my sayings, he is like to a man who built his house upon a rock, &c.
  • THEOPHYL; The rock is Christ. He digs deep; by the precepts of humility He plucks out all earthly things from the hearts of the faithful, lest they should serve God from regard to their temporal good.
  • BASIL; But lay your foundations upon , a rock, that is, lean upon the faith of Christ, so as to persevere immovable in adversity, whether it come from man or God.
  • THEOPHYL; Or the foundation of the house is the resolution to live a good life, which the perfect hearer firmly lays in fulfilling the commandments of God.
  • AMBROSE; Or, He teaches that the obedience to heavenly precepts is the foundation of all virtue, by means of which this our house can be moved neither by the torrent of pleasures, nor by the violence of spiritual wickedness, neither by the storms of this world, nor by the cloudy disputations of heretics; hence it follows, But the flood came, &c.
  • THEOPHYL; A flood comes in three ways, either by unclean spirits, or wicked men, or the very restlessness of mind or body; and as far as men trust in their own strength they fall away, but as long as they cling to the immovable rock they cannot even be shaken.
  • CHRYS. The Lord also shows us that faith profits a man nothing, if his manner of life be corrupt. Hence it follows, But he that hears and does not, is like a man, that without a foundation built an house upon the earth, &c.
  • THEOPHYL; The house of the devil is the world which lies in wickedness, which he builds upon the earth, because those who obey him he drags down from heaven to earth; he builds without foundation, for sin has no foundation, standing not by its own nature, for evil is without substance, which yet whatever it is, grows up in the nature of good. But because the foundation is called so from fundus, we may not unfitly understand that fundamentum is placed here for fundus. As then he who is fallen into a well is kept at the bottom of the well, so the soul falling away remains stationary, as it were, at the very bottom, as long as it continues in any measure of sin. But not content with the sin into which it is fallen, while daily sinking into worse, it can find no bottom, as it were, in the well to which it may fix itself. But every kind of temptation increasing, both the really bad and the feignedly good become worse, until at last they come to everlasting punishment Hence it follows, Against which the stream did beat vehemently. By the force of the stream may be understood the trial of the last judgment, when both houses being finished, the wicked shall go into everlasting punishment but the righteous into life eternal.
  • CYRIL; Or they build upon the earth without foundation, who upon the quicksand of doubt, which relates to opinion, lay the foundation of their spiritual building, which a few drops of temptation wash away.
  • AUG. Now this long discourse of our Lord, Luke begins in the same way as Matthew; for each says, Blessed are the poor. Then many things which follow in the narration of each are like, and finally the conclusion of the discourse is found to be altogether the same, I mean with respect to the men who build upon the rock and the sand. It might then easily be supposed that Luke has inserted the same discourse of our Lord, and yet has left out some sentences which Matthew has kept, and likewise put in others which Matthew has not; were it not that Matthew says the discourse was spoken by our Lord on the mountain, but Luke on the plain by our Lord standing. It is not however thought likely from this that these two discourses are separated by a long course of time, because both before and after both have related some things like or the same. It may however have happened that our Lord was at first on a higher part of the mountain with His disciples alone, and that then he descended with them from the mount, that is, from the summit of the mountain to the flat place, that is, to some level ground, which was on the side of the mountain, and was able to hold large multitudes, and that there He stood until the crowds were gathered together to Him, and afterwards when He sat down His disciples came nearer, and to them, and the rest of the multitude who were present, He held the same discourse.