Sunday Scripture Readings February 28 2010 2nd Sunday of Lent

February 28 2010 Second Sunday of Lent

About the sources used. The readings on this site are not official for the Mass of Roman Rite of the Catholic Church in the USA, but are from sources free from copyright. They are here to present the comparable readings alongside traditional Catholic commentary as published in the Haydock Bible for your own personal study. Readings vary depending on your local calendar.

Official Readings of the Liturgy at – http://www.usccb.org/nab/

Genesis 15:5-12, 17-18
Douay-Rheims Challoner

And he brought him forth abroad, and said to him:

Look up to heaven and number the stars if thou canst.

And he said to him:

So shall thy seed be.

Abram believed God, and it was reputed to him unto justice. And he said to him:

I am the Lord who brought thee out from Ur of the Chaldees, to give thee this land, and that thou mightest possess it.

But he said:

Lord God, whereby may I know that I shall possess it?

And the Lord answered, and said:

Take me a cow of three years old, and a she-goat of three years. and a ram of three years, a turtle also, and a pigeon.

And he took all these, and divided them in the midst, and laid the two pieces of each one against the other: but the birds he divided not. And the fowls came down upon the carcasses, and Abram drove them away. And when the sun was setting, a deep sleep fell upon Abram, and a great and darksome horror seized upon him. And when the sun was set, there arose a dark mist, and there appeared a smoking furnace, and a lamp of fire passing between those divisions. That day God made a covenant with Abram, saying:

To thy seed will I give this land, from the river to Egypt even to the great river Euphrates.

Responsorial Psalm 26:1, 7-9, 13-14 (Ps 27 NAB)
DR Challoner Text Only

The Lord is my light and my salvation, whom shall I fear?
The Lord is the protector of my life: of whom shall I be afraid?
Hear, O Lord, my voice, with which I have cried to thee: have mercy on me and hear me.
My heart hath said to thee: My face hath sought thee: thy face, O Lord, will I still seek.
Turn not away thy face from me; decline not in thy wrath from thy servant.
Be thou my helper, forsake me not; do not thou despise me, O God my Saviour.
I believe to see the good things of the Lord in the land of the living.
Expect the Lord, do manfully, and let thy heart take courage, and wait thou for the Lord.

Philippians 3:20—4:1
Haydock New Testament

But our conversation is in heaven: whence also we expect the Saviour, our Lord Jesus Christ, Who will reform the body of our lowness, made like to the body of his glory, according to the operation whereby also he is able to subdue all things unto himself.

Therefore, my brethren, dearly beloved, and most desired, my joy and my crown: so stand fast in the Lord, most beloved.

The Holy Gospel of Jesus Christ According to Saint Luke 9:28b-36
Haydock New Testament

Jesus took Peter, and James, and John, and went up into a mountain to pray. And whilst he prayed, the appearance of his countenance was altered: and his raiment became white and glittering. And behold two men were talking with him. And they were Moses and Elias, Appearing in majesty: and they spoke of his decease, which he was to accomplish in Jerusalem.

But Peter, and they that were with him, were heavy with sleep. And awaking, they saw his majesty, and the two men that stood with him. And it came to pass, that as they were departing from him, Peter saith to Jesus:

Master, it is good for us to be here: and let us make three tabernacles, one for thee, and one for Moses, and one for Elias:

not knowing what he said. And as he spoke these things, there came a cloud, and overshadowed them: and they were afraid, when they entered into the cloud. And a voice came out of the cloud, saying:

This is my beloved Son, hear him.

And whilst the voice was uttered, Jesus was found alone. And they held their peace, and told no man in those days any of these things which they had seen.

Haydock Commentary Genesis 15:5-12, 17-18
Notes Copied From Haydock Commentary Site

  • Ver. 6. Reputed by God, who cannot judge wrong; so that Abram increased in justice by this act of faith, believing that his wife, now advanced in years, would have a child; from whom others should spring, more numerous than the stars of heaven. H. — This faith was accompanied and followed by many other acts of virtue. S. Jam. ii. 22. W.
  • Ver. 8. Whereby, &c. Thus the blessed Virgin asked, how shall this be done? Lu. i. 34. without the smallest degree of unbelief. Abram wished to know, by what signs he should be declared the lawful owner of the land. H.
  • Ver. 9. Three years, when these animals have obtained a perfect age.
  • Ver. 12. A deep sleep, or ecstasy, like that of Adam. G. ii. 21, wherein God revealed to him the oppression of his posterity in Egypt, which filled him with such horror (M.) as we experience when something frightful comes upon us suddenly in the dark. This darkness represents the dismal situation of Joseph, confined in a dungeon; and of the Hebrews condemned to hard labour, in making bricks, and obliged to hide their male children, for fear of their being discovered, and slain. Before these unhappy days commenced, the posterity of Abram were exposed to great oppression among the Chanaanites, nor could they in any sense be said to possess the land of promise, for above 400 years after this prophetic sleep. H.
  • Ver. 17. A lamp, or symbol of the Divinity, passing, as Abram also did, between the divided beasts, to ratify the covenant. See Jer. xxxiv. 18.
  • Ver. 18. Of Egypt, a branch of the Nile, not far from Pelusium. This was to be the southern limit, and the Euphrates the northern; the two other boundaries are given, Num. xxxiv. — Perhaps Solomon’s empire extended so far. At least, the Jews would have enjoyed these territories, if they had been faithful. M.

Haydock Commentary Philippians 3:20—4:1

Nada

Haydock Commentary Luke 9:28b-36

  • Ver. 28. Mountain, &c. — Since Christ has ascended the mountain, both to pray and to be transfigured, all of us who hope for the fruit of his resurrection, and long to see the king in his glory, must dwell in heaven by our thoughts, and apply our minds to continual prayer. Ven. Bede.
  • Ver. 30. And behold two men. Moses and Elias, by ministering to our Lord in his glory, shewed him to be the Lord of both the Old and New Testament. The disciples also, upon seeing the glory of their fellow-creatures, would be filled with admiration at the condescension of their divine Master; and considering the delights of future happiness, be stirred up to a holy emulation of those who had laboured before them, and be fortified in their ensuing conflicts; for nothing so much lightens the present labour, as the consideration of the future recompense. S. Cyril.
  • Ver. 31. They spoke of his decease,[2] or his departure out of this world. S. Peter useth the same Greek word for his death. 2 Pet. i. 15. Wi.
  • Ver. 33. It is good for us. It is not good, O Peter, for Christ to remain always. Should he have remained there, the promise he had made thee would never have been fulfilled. Thou wouldst never have obtained the keys of the kingdom of heaven, and the reign of death would not have been destroyed. Seek not for joys before the time, as Adam sought to be made like God. The time will come, when thou shalt for eternity behold him, and reign with him who is life and light. Damasus Orat. de Transfigurat. Domini. — Three tabernacles. The Lord does appoint thee the builder, not of tabernacles, but of his whole Church. Thy disciples, thy sheep, have fulfilled thy desire, by erecting tabernacles for Christ and his faithful servants. These words of S. Peter, let us make, &c. were not spoken of himself, but by the prophetic inspiration of the Holy Ghost. Therefore it is added, he knew not what he said. Damasus, ut supra. — S. Peter knew not what he said, because by proposing to make three tabernacles for these three personages, he improperly ranked together, the servants and their Lord, the creature and the Creator. Titus Bostrensis.
  • Ver. 35. And a voice, &c. This is the voice of the Father from the cloud, as if he should say, “I call him not one of my sons, but my true and natural Son, to the resemblance of whom all others are adopted. S. Cyril. — Not Elias, not Moses, but he whom you see alone, is my beloved Son. S. Ambrose. — Therefore, it is added: and when the voice was heard, Jesus was alone, lest any one should imagine these words, This is my beloved Son, were addressed to Moses or Elias.” Theophylact.
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Daily Scripture Readings Saturday February 27 2010 1st Week of Lent

February 27 2010 Saturday First Week of Lent
Saint of the Day – St. Gabriel of Our Lady of Sorrows

About the sources used. The readings on this site are from the Haydock Bible according to the daily Lectionary readings for the American Roman Catholic Church. The Haydock Bible contains traditional Catholic commentary and is free from copyright. Due to verse numbering differences and pastoral deletions in the actual Lectionary, these readings may at times vary from the actual readings.

Official Readings of the Liturgy at – http://www.usccb.org/nab/

Deuteronomy 26:16-19
Douay-Rheims Challoner

This day the Lord thy God hath commanded thee to do these commandments and judgments: and to keep and fulfil them with all thy heart, and with all thy soul. Thou hast chosen the Lord this day to be thy God, and to walk in his ways and keep his ceremonies, and precepts, and judgments, and obey his command. And the Lord hath chosen thee this day, to be his peculiar people, as he hath spoken to thee, and to keep all his commandments: And to make thee higher than all nations which he hath created, to his own praise, and name, and glory: that thou mayst be a holy people of the Lord thy God, as he hath spoken.

Responsorial Psalm 118:1-2, 4-5, 7-8 (Ps 119 NAB)
DR Challoner Text Only

Blessed are the undefiled in the way, who walk in the law of the Lord.
Blessed are they that search his testimonies: that seek him with their whole heart.
Thou hast commanded thy commandments to be kept most diligently.
O! that my ways may be directed to keep thy justifications.
I will praise thee with uprightness of heart,
when I shall have learned the judgments of thy justice.
I will keep thy justifications: O! do not thou utterly forsake me.

The Holy Gospel of Jesus Christ According to Saint Matthew 5:43-48
Haydock New Testament

You have heard that it hath been said: Thou shalt love thy neighbor, and hate thy enemy. But I say to you: Love your enemies: do good to them that hate you: and pray for them that persecute and calumniate you, That you may be the children of your Father, who is in heaven: who maketh his sun to rise upon the good and bad, and raineth upon the just and the unjust. For if you love those that love you, what reward shall you have? do not even the publicans the same? And if you salute your brethren only, what do you more? do not also the heathens the same? Be you therefore perfect, as also your heavenly Father is perfect

Haydock Commentary Deuteronomy 26:16-19
Notes Copied From Haydock Commentary Site

  • Ver. 16. This day. In this last solemn harangue of Moses, the covenant between God and his people was ratified.  M.
  • Ver. 19. To his own praise. Heb. Sept. &c. “higher…in praise, reputation, and glory.”  H.

Haydock Commentary Matthew 5:43-48

  • Ver. 43And hate thy enemy. The words of the law (Levit. xix. 18.) are only these: thou shalt love thy friend as thyself; but by a false gloss and inference, these words, and hate thy enemy, were added by the Jewish doctors.  Wi.
  • Ver. 44. I come to establish the purity of the law, which they have corrupted.  A.
  • Ver. 46. The publicans. These were the gatherers of the public taxes: a set of men, odious and infamous among the Jews, for their extortions and injustice.  Ch.
  • Ver. 48. Jesus Christ here sums up his instructions by ordering us to be perfect as our heavenly Father is perfect; i.e. to imitate, as far as our exertions, assisted by divine grace, can reach, the divine perfection.  Wi. — See here the great superiority of the new over the old law.  But let no one hence take occasion to despise the old.  Let him examine attentively, says S. Chrysostom, the different periods of time, and the persons to whom it was given; and he will admire the wisdom of the divine Legislator, and clearly perceive that it is one and the same Lord, and that each law was to the great advantage of mankind, and wisely adapted to the times of their promulgation.  For, if among the first principles of rectitude, these sublime and eminent truths had been found, perhaps neither these, nor the less perfect rules of mortality would have been observed; whereas, by disposing of both in their proper time, the divine wisdom has employed both for the correction of the world.  Hom. xviii.  Seeing then that we are thus blessed as to be called, and to be the children of so excellent a Father, we should endeavour, like Him, to excel in goodness, meekness, and charity; but above all in humility, which will secure to us the merit of good works, through the infinite merits of our divine Redeemer, Master, and model, Christ Jesus the Lord.  A.

Daily Scripture Readings Friday February 26 2010 1st Week of Lent

February 26 2010 Friday First Week of Lent
Saint of the Day – St. Porphyry of Gaza

About the sources used. The readings on this site are from the Haydock Bible according to the daily Lectionary readings for the American Roman Catholic Church. The Haydock Bible contains traditional Catholic commentary and is free from copyright. Due to verse numbering differences and pastoral deletions in the actual Lectionary, these readings may at times vary from the actual readings.

Official Readings of the Liturgy at – http://www.usccb.org/nab/

Ezekiel 18:21-28
Douay-Rheims Challoner

But if the wicked do penance for all his sins which he hath committed, and keep all my commandments, and do judgment, and justice, living he shall live, and shall not die. I will not remember all his iniquities that he hath done: in his justice which he hath wrought, he shall live. Is it my will that a sinner should die, saith the Lord God, and not that he should be converted from his ways, and live?

But if the just man turn himself away from his justice, and do iniquity according to all the abominations which the wicked man useth to work, shall he live? all his justices which he hath done, shall not be remembered: in the prevarication, by which he hath prevaricated, and in his sin, which he hath committed, in them he shall die. And you have said: The way of the Lord is not right. Hear ye, therefore, O house of Israel: Is it my way that is not right, and are not rather your ways perverse?

For when the just turneth himself away from his justice, and comitteth iniquity, he shall die therein: in the injustice that he hath wrought he shall die. And when the wicked turneth himself away from his wickedness, which he hath wrought, and doeth judgment, and justice: he shall save his soul alive. Because he considereth and turneth away himself from all his iniquities which he hath wrought, he shall surely live, and not die.

Responsorial Psalm 129:1-8 (Ps 130 NAB/RSV/NJB/Hebrew)
DR Challoner Text Only

Out of the depths I have cried to thee, O Lord:
Lord, hear my voice.
Let thy ears be attentive to the voice of my supplication.
If thou, O Lord, wilt mark iniquities:
Lord, who shall stand it.
For with thee there is merciful forgiveness:
and by reason of thy law, I have waited for thee, O Lord.
My soul hath relied on his word:
my soul hath hoped in the Lord.
From the morning watch even until night,
let Israel hope in the Lord.
Because with the Lord there is mercy:
and with him plentiful redemption.
And he shall redeem Israel from all his iniquities.

The Holy Gospel of Jesus Christ According to Saint Matthew 5:20-26
Haydock New Testament

Jesus said:

For I say to you, that unless your justice abound more than that of the Scribes and of the Pharisees, you shall not enter into the kingdom of heaven. You have heard that it was said to them of old: Thou shalt not kill. And whosoever shall kill, shall be liable to the judgment. But I say to you, that whosoever is angry with his brother, shall be liable to the judgment. And whosoever shall say to his brother, Raca, shall be liable to the council. And whosoever shall say, Thou fool, shall be in danger of hell fire.

Therefore, if thou offer thy gift at the altar, and there shalt remember that thy brother hath any thing against thee; Leave there thy gift before the altar, and go first to be reconciled to thy brother: and then come and offer thy gift. Agree with thy adversary quickly, whilst thou art in the way with him: lest perhaps the adversary deliver thee to the judge, and the judge deliver thee to the officer, and thou be cast into prison.  Amen, I say to thee, thou shalt not go out from thence, till thou pay the last farthing.

Haydock Commentary Ezechiel 18:21-28
Notes Copied From Haydock Commentary Site

  • Ver. 21. Penance. The end determines all.  If a person be then found just or unjust at his departure, he will be treated accordingly.  W.
  • Ver. 23. Will. God sincerely wishes that the sinner should be converted.  If he refuse grace, it is only in punishment of former transgressions.  S. Aug. ep. 217. — He wills antecedently their salvation, (1 Tim. ii. 4.) though he has a consequent will to punish them, as they speak in the schools, because they themselves will not be saved.  Sanct.  C. — God’s absolute will is always fulfilled, not that which is conditional.  S. Jo. Dam. (Fide ii. 29.)  S. Tho. p. 1. q. 19. a. 6. — He does enough by offering his graces and the death of Christ, to shew that his will is sincere; though by a consequent will his justice punishes the impenitent.  Thus a virtuous judge would have all to observe the laws and live: but finding some transgress, so as to become pernicious, he punishes them with death.  W.
  • Ver. 24. Remembered, to procure him pardon; yet he will suffer less than if he had never done any good.  C.
  • Ver. 25. Not right, in thus punishing or rewarding for the last act; (Theod.) or rather, God shews that those who complain are guilty.
  • Ver. 27. Alive. Mortal sin destroys that life of grace.  C.

Haydock Commentary Matthew 5:20-26

  • Ver. 20. Of the Scribes and of the  Pharisees. The Scribes were the doctors of the law of Moses; the Pharisees were a precise set of men, making profession of a more exact observance of the law: and upon that account greatly esteemed among the people.  Ch. See how necessary it is, not only to believe, but to keep all the commandments, even the very least.  B. Our Saviour makes this solemn declaration at the opening of his mission, to shew to what a height of perfection he calls us.  Aquin. “Your justice.”  It is our justice when given us by God.  Aug. in Ps. xxx. l. de. spir. & lit. c. ix.  So that Christians are truly just, and have in themselves inherent justice, by observing God’s commandments, without which justice of works, no man can be saved.  Aug. de fide & oper. c. xvi.  Whereby we see salvation, justice and justification, do not come by faith only, or imputation of Christ’s justice.  B.
  • Ver. 21. Shall be liable to the judgment. That is, shall deserve to be punished by that lesser tribunal among the Jews, called the judgment, which took cognizance of such crimes.  Ch. Among the Jews at the time of Christ, there were three sorts of tribunals: the first composed of three judges to try smaller causes, as theft; there was one in each town: the second of twenty-three judges, who judged criminal causes, and had the power of condemning to death.  This was called the Little Sanhedrim, and of this it is supposed Jesus Christ speaks: the third, or Great Sanhedrim of seventy-two judges, who decided on the most momentous affairs, relating to religion, the king, the high priest, and the state in general.  It is this last that is designated under the name of council in the next verse.  A.
  • Ver. 22. Whosoever is angry[2] with his brother. In almost all Greek copies and MSS. we now read angry without a cause: yet S. Jerom, who corrected the Latin of the New Testament from the best copies in his time, tells us that these words, without a cause, were only found in some Greek copies, and not in the true ones. It seems at fist to have been placed in the margin for an interpretation only, and by some transcribers afterwards taken into the text.  This as well as many other places may convince us, that the Latin Vulgate is many times to be preferred to our present Greek copies. Roca.[3]  S. Augustin thinks this was no significant word, but only a kind of interjection expression a motion of anger.  Others take it for a Syro-Chaldaic word, signifying a light, foolish man, though not so injurious as to call another a fool. Shall be guilty of the council:[4] that is, shall deserve to be punished by the highest court of judicature, called the council, or sanhedrim, consisting of seventy-two persons, where the highest causes were tried and judged, and which was at Jerusalem. Thou fool; this was a most provoking injury, when uttered with contempt, spite, or malice. Shall be in danger of hell fire.[5]  Lit. according to the Greek, shall deserve to be cast into the Gehennon of fire. Gehennom was the valley of Hinnom, near to Jerusalem, where the worshippers of the idol Moloch used to burn their children, sacrificed to that idol.  In that place was a perpetual fire, on which account it is made use of by our Saviour (as it hath been ever since), to express the fire and punishments of hell.  Wi. Here is a plain difference between sin and sin; some mortal, that lead to hell; some venial, and less punished.  B.
  • Ver. 23. He commands us to leave unfinished any work we may have begun, though in its own nature most acceptable to God, in order to go and be reconciled to our brother; because God will have mercy and not sacrifice.  Thus he in a manner seems to prefer the love of our neighbour to the love of himself.  M.
  • Ver. 24. Leave thy offering. This is not to be understood, as if a man were always bound to go to the person offended; but it is to signify, that a man is bound in his heart and mind to be reconciled, to forgive every one, and seek peace with all men.  Wi. Beware of coming to the holy table, or to any sacrament, without charity.  Be first reconciled to your brother, and much more to the Catholic Church, which is the whole brotherhood of Christian men.  Heb. xiii. 1.  B.
  • Ver. 25. & 26. Agree whilst you are in the way, or wayfaring men, i.e. in this life, lest you be cast into prison, i.e. according to SS. Cyprian, Ambrose, and Origen, into purgatory; according to S. Augustin, into hell, in which, as the debt is to be paid to inflexible justice, it can never be acquitted, and of course no release can be hoped for from that prison.  A.

Daily Scripture Readings Thursday February 25 2010 1st Week of Lent

February 25 2010 Thursday First Week of Lent
Saint of the Day – Blessed Sebastian of Aparicio

About the sources used. The readings on this site are not official for the Mass of Roman Rite of the Catholic Church in the USA, but are from sources free from copyright. They are here to present the comparable readings alongside traditional Catholic commentary as published in the Haydock Bible for your own personal study. Readings vary depending on your local calendar.

Official Readings of the Liturgy at – http://www.usccb.org/nab/

Esther C:12, 14-16, 23-25 (DR 14:1-14)
Douay-Rheims Challoner

Queen Esther also, fearing the danger that was at hand, had recourse to the Lord. And when she had laid away her royal apparel, she put on garments suitable for weeping and mourning: instead of divers precious ointments, she covered her head with ashes and dung, and she humbled her body with fasts: and all the places in which before she was accustomed to rejoice, she filled with her torn hair. And she prayed to the Lord the God of Israel, saying:

O my Lord, who alone art our king, help me a desolate woman, and who have no other helper but thee. My danger is in my hands. I have heard of my father that thou, O Lord, didst take Israel from among all nations, and our fathers from all their predecessors, to possess them as an everlasting inheritance, and thou hast done to them as thou hast promised. We have sinned in thy sight, and therefore thou hast delivered us into the hands of our enemies: For we have worshipped their gods. Thou art just, O Lord. And now they are not content to oppress us with most hard bondage, but attributing the strength of their hands to the power of their idols, They design to change thy promises, and destroy thy inheritance, and shut the mouths of them that praise thee, and extinguish the glory of thy temple and altar, That they may open the mouths of Gentiles, and praise the strength of idols, and magnify for ever a carnal king.

Give not, O Lord, thy sceptre to them that are not, lest they laugh at our ruin: but turn their counsel upon themselves, and destroy him that hath begun to rage against us. Remember, O Lord, and shew thyself to us in the time of our tribulation, and give me boldness, O Lord, king of gods, and of all power: Give me a well ordered speech in my mouth in the presence of the lion, and turn his heart to the hatred of our enemy, that both he himself may perish, and the rest that consent to him. But deliver us by thy hand, and help me, who have no other helper, but thee, O Lord, who hast the knowledge of all things.

Responsorial Psalm 137:1-3, 7c-8 (Ps 138 NAB)
DR Challoner Text Only

I will praise thee, O Lord, with my whole heart:
for thou hast heard the words of my mouth.
I will sing praise to thee in the sight of the angels:
I will worship towards thy holy temple,
and I will give glory to thy name.
For thy mercy, and for thy truth:
for thou hast magnified thy holy name above all.
In what day soever I shall call upon thee, hear me:
thou shalt multiply strength in my soul.

The Holy Gospel of Jesus Christ According to Saint Matthew 7:7-12
Haydock New Testament

Jesus said:

Ask, and it shall be given you: seek, and you shall find: knock, and it shall be opened to you. For everyone that asketh, receiveth: and he that seeketh, findeth: and to him that knocketh, it shall be opened.

Or what man is there among you, of whom if his son shall ask bread, will he reach him a stone? Or if he shall ask a fish, will he reach him a serpent? If you then being evil, know how to give good gifts to your children: how much more will your Father, who is in heaven, give good things to them that ask him?

All things, therefore, whatsoever you would that men should do to you, do you also to them. For this is the law and the prophets.

Haydock Commentary Esther 14:1-14
Notes Copied From Haydock Commentary Site

  • Ver. 1. Fearing. Gr. “caught in the agony of death.”  The old Vulgate has many variations in this chapter.  C. — This prayer should be placed after that of Mardochai, at the end of C. iv.  M.
  • Ver. 2. Ointments. Gr. “instead of the proud sweets, she filled her head with ashes and dust.”  Such as might be soon cleansed again.  H. — Torn. Gr. “curled hair,” (straptwn trichwn.  H.) some of which she cut off.  See Lev. xix. 27. and xxi. 5.  Houbig.
  • Ver. 4. Hands; very imminent.  I am ready to expose my life.  Ps. cxviii. 109.  C.
  • Ver. 5. Heard. Old Vulg. often repeats, “from the books of my fathers;” adducing the various instances of protection which God had shewn to his people, Noe, Abraham, Jonas, the three children, Daniel, Ezechias, and Anna: which intimates that Esther made the sacred books the subject of her frequent meditations, as good people ought to do.  H.
  • Ver. 7. For. Gr. “since we have extolled,” &c.  Esther had not been guilty herself of this prevarication; but too many of the people had.  H.
  • Ver. 8. But. Gr. Compl. “Yea, thou hast placed (or rather as the Alex. MS. reads, they have placed) their hands upon the hands of their idols, (H.  making league together.  C.) to tear away the decree of thy mouth,” (H.) and to  put in execution the projects of (M.) the devil.  H.
  • Ver. 10. Idols. Gr. “of the vain things, and to render wonderful for ever,” &c.
  • Ver. 11. Not idols, as they are often here designated, (C. and 1 Cor. viii.) being only the imaginations of men.  W. — Destroy. Gr. “Make an example of the man, who had begun (H. evils. C.) against us.”  H. — She throws the blame upon Aman, and not upon her husband.  C.
  • Ver. 12. Gods. Gr. “nations, and Lord of all power.”  H.
  • Ver. 13. Lion. This expression seems not sufficiently respectful.  Capellus. — But why might not Esther use it with regard to one, who  was raging against her people more than any lion, as S. Paul applies it to Nero, probably after her example?  Houbigant.  2 Tim. iv. 17. — David also thus styles Saul and his persecutors in general.  Ps. vii. 3. &c.  C.

Haydock Commentary Matthew 7:7-12

  • Ver. 7. After having preached these great and wonderful truths, after having commanded his apostles to keep themselves free from the vices of mankind, and make themselves like not to angels or archangels only, but to the Lord of all things; and  not only observe justice themselves, but likewise to labour for the correction of others, lest they should be disheartened at these almost insurmountable difficulties: our Redeemer subjoins, Ask, and you shall receive, &c.  When we offer our petitions to the Almighty, we must imitate the example of Solomon, who immediately obtained what he asked of the Lord, because he asked what he ought.  Two things, therefore, are necessary to every prayer, that it be offered up with perseverance and fervour, and that it contain a lawful prayer.  Chry. hom. xxiv. The reasons why so many do not obtain the effects of their prayers, are, 1st. Because they ask for what is evil; and he that makes such a request, offers the Almighty an intolerable injury by wishing to make him, as it were, the author of evil:  2nd. Although what they ask be not evil, they seek it for an evil end.  S. James iv.:  3rd. Because they who pray, are themselves wicked; (S. John ix.) for God doth not hear sinners:  4th. Because they ask with no faith, or with faith weak and wavering:  (S. James i.)  5th. Because although what we ask be good in itself, yet the Almighty refuses it, in order to grant us a greater good:  6th. Because God wishes us to persevere, as he declares in the parable of the friend asking bread, Luke, ch. ii.; and that we may esteem his gifts the more:  7th. We do not always receive what we beg, because, according to S. Augustine, (lib. ii, de Serm. Dom. et epis. 34, ad Paulinum) God often does not grant us what we petition for, that he may grant us something more useful and profitable.  Maldonatus.
  • Ver. 8. Whatever we ask necessary to salvation with humility, fervour, perseverance, and other due circumstances, we may be assured God will grant when it is best for us.  If we do not obtain what we pray for, we must suppose it is not conducive to our salvation,  in comparison of which all else is of little moment.  A.
  • Ver. 9. Lest any one considering the great inequality between God and man, should despair of obtaining favours of God, and therefore should not dare to offer up his petitions, he immediately introduces this similitude of the Father; so that if we were on the point of despairing on account of our sins, from his fatherly tenderness we might still have hopes.  S. Thos. Aquinas.
  • Ver. 12. For this is the law and the prophets; that is, all precepts that regard our neighbour are directed by this golden rule, do as you would be done by. Wi. The whole law and all the duties between man and man, inculcated by the prophets, have this principle for foundation.  The Roman emperor Alexander Severus, is related to have said, that he esteemed the Christians for their acting on this principle.  A. This is the sum of the law and of the prophets, the whole law of the Jews.  M.

Daily Scripture Readings Wednesday February 24 2010 1st Week of Lent

February 24 2010 Wednesday First Week of Lent
Saint of the Day – Blessed Luke Belludi

About the sources used. The readings on this site are not official for the Mass of Roman Rite of the Catholic Church in the USA, but are from sources free from copyright. They are here to present the comparable readings alongside traditional Catholic commentary as published in the Haydock Bible for your own personal study. Readings vary depending on your local calendar.

Official Readings of the Liturgy at – http://www.usccb.org/nab/

Jonah 3:1-10
Douay-Rheims Challoner

And the word of the Lord came to Jonah the second time saying:

Arise, and go to Ninive, the great city: and preach in it the preaching that I bid thee.

And Jonah arose, and went to Ninive, according to the word of the Lord: now Ninive was a great city of three days’ journey. And Jonah began to enter into the city one day’s journey: and he cried and said:

Yet forty days and Ninive shall be destroyed.

And the men of Ninive believed in God: and they proclaimed a fast, and put on sackcloth from the greatest to the least. And the word came to the king of Ninive: and he rose up out of his throne, and cast away his robe from him, and was clothed in sackcloth, and sat in ashes. And he caused it to be proclaimed and published in Ninive, from the mouth of the king and of his princes, saying:

Let neither men nor beasts, oxen, nor sheep taste anything: let them not feed, nor drink water. And let men and beasts be covered with sackcloth, and cry to the Lord with all their strength, and let them turn every one from his evil way, and from the iniquity that is in their hands. Who can tell if God will turn, and forgive: and will turn away from his fierce anger, and we shall not perish?

And God saw their works, that they were turned from their evil way: and God had mercy with regard to the evil which he had said that he would do to them, and he did it not.

Responsorial Psalm 50:3-4, 12-13, 18-19 (Ps 51 NAB)
DR Challoner Text Only

Have mercy on me, O God, according to thy great mercy.
And according to the multitude of thy tender mercies blot out my iniquity.
Wash me yet more from my iniquity, and cleanse me from my sin.
Create a clean heart in me, O God: and renew a right spirit within my bowels.
Cast me not away from thy face; and take not thy holy spirit from me.
For if thou hadst desired sacrifice, I would indeed have given it:
with burnt offerings thou wilt not be delighted.
A sacrifice to God is an afflicted spirit:
a contrite and humbled heart, O God, thou wilt not despise.

The Holy Gospel of Jesus Christ According to Saint Luke 11:29-32
Haydock New Testament

And when the people were gathered together, he began to say:

This generation is a wicked generation: they ask a sign, and a sign shall not be given them, but the sign of Jonah, the prophet. For as Jonah was a sign to the Ninivites, so shall the Son of man also be to this generation. The Queen of the South shall rise in judgment with the men of this generation, and shall condemn them: because she came from the ends of the earth to hear the wisdom of Solomon; and behold more than Solomon here. The men of Nineveh shall rise in judgment with this generation, and shall condemn it, because they did penance at the preaching of Jonah; and behold more than Jonah here.

Haydock Commentary Jonas 3:1-10
Notes Copied From Haydock Commentary Site

  • Ver. 2. Bid thee before, or when thou shalt be there.  C. — He seems to have retired to Jerusalem.  M.
  • Ver. 3. Journey. By the computation of some ancient historians, Ninive was about fifty miles round: so that to go through all the chief streets and public places, was three days’ journey.  Ch. — Diodorus (iii. 1.) says Ninive was 150 stadia or furlongs in length.  It must have been therefore 480 round; and as each furlong contains 125 paces of 5 ft. each, the compass would be “60 Italian miles, (about 50 Eng.)” which would employ a person three days to go through the principal streets.  W. — Ninive “was much larger that Babylon.”  Strabo xvi. — Heb. “a great city of God,” &c. denoting its stupendous size.
  • Ver. 4. Journey. He records what he said the first day, though he seems to have preached many (Theod.) even during forty days, after which time (H.) he expected the city would fall, and therefore retired out of the walls.  C. iv. — Forty. Sept. three. S. Justin, (dial.) “three, or forty-three.”  Theodoret thinks that the mistake was made by some ancient transcriber, and has since prevailed in all the copies of the Sept.  All the rest have forty.  S. Aug. (de civ. Dei. xviii. 44.) believes the Sept. placed three for a mysterious reason.  Origen (hom. xvi.  Num.) suggests that the prophet determined the number, and hence God did not execute the threat.  C. — This and many other menaces are conditional.  If men repent, God will change his sentence.  S. Chrys.  S. Greg. Mor. xvi. 18.  W.
  • Ver. 5. God. They were convinced that he had wrought such wonders in the person of Jonas, with a desire of their welfare, particularly as he allowed them some delay.  Accordingly they did penance for about forty days, and their conversion was so sincere, that Christ proposes it to his disciples.  Mat. xii. 41.  C. — Thus “the city was overturned in its perverse manners.”  S. Aug. de civ. Dei. xxi. 24. and Ps. l. — They were at an end, and the city was renovated.  H.
  • Ver. 6. King Sardanapalus, (Salien, A. 3216) or rather his father, Phul, whom Strabo calls Anacyndaraxes, (C.) and who died in the year 3237, (Usher) four years after he had invaded Palestine.  4 K. xv. 19.
  • Ver. 7. Princes. Their consent was requisite, to form an irrevocable edict.  Dan. vi. 8. — Men. Even infants, according to the Fathers.  Joel ii. 16.  S. Basil adds also, the young of cattle.  This was done to excite rational beings to repentance.  Theod. —  We do not find that cattle were deprived of food on such occasions among the Jews.  But Virgil specifies that this was the case at the death of Cæsar, (Ecl. v.) as it was in droughts among some nations of America.  Horn ii. 13.  C. — When people are greatly moved by repentance, they exceed in austerity; but if this be not indiscreet, God accepts of their good intention.  W.
  • Ver. 10. Mercy. Heb. “repented,” as some copies of the Sept. read, while others have, “was comforted.”  H. — God suspended the stroke.  But as the people soon relapsed, Sardanapalus burnt himself to death, and the city was taken, (S. Jer.) thirty-seven years after Jeroboam.  A. 3257.  Usher. — Yet this was only a prelude to its future ruin, foretold by Tobias, (xiv. 5. in Gr.) and effected by Nabopolassar and Astyages. C.  A. 3378.  Usher. — The vestiges did not appear in the days of Lucian, (Charon.  C.) soon after Christ.  H.

Haydock Commentary Luke 11:29-32

  • Ver. 29. But the sign of Jonas. Instead of a prodigy in the heavens or in the air, I will give you one in the bosom of the earth, more wonderful than that of the prophet Jonas, who came out alive from the belly of the fish, which had swallowed him.  Thus I will return alive from the bosom of the earth three days after my death.  Calmet. He gave them a sign, not from heaven, for they were unworthy to behold it, but from the deep; the sign of his incarnation, not of his divinity; of his passion, not of his glory.  V. Bede.
  • Ver. 31. Queen of the South shall condemn this generation, not by exercising the power of judgment against them, but by having performed an action which, when put in competition with theirs, will be found superior to them.  V. Bede.

Daily Scripture Readings February 28 2010 2nd Sunday of Lent

February 28 2010 Second Sunday of Lent

About the sources used. The readings on this site are not official for the Mass of Roman Rite of the Catholic Church in the USA, but are from sources free from copyright. They are here to present the comparable readings alongside traditional Catholic commentary as published in the Haydock Bible for your own personal study. Readings vary depending on your local calendar.

Official Readings of the Liturgy at – http://www.usccb.org/nab/

Genesis 15:5-12, 17-18
Douay-Rheims Challoner

And he brought him forth abroad, and said to him:

Look up to heaven and number the stars if thou canst.

And he said to him:

So shall thy seed be.

Abram believed God, and it was reputed to him unto justice. And he said to him:

I am the Lord who brought thee out from Ur of the Chaldees, to give thee this land, and that thou mightest possess it.

But he said:

Lord God, whereby may I know that I shall possess it?

And the Lord answered, and said:

Take me a cow of three years old, and a she-goat of three years. and a ram of three years, a turtle also, and a pigeon.

And he took all these, and divided them in the midst, and laid the two pieces of each one against the other: but the birds he divided not. And the fowls came down upon the carcasses, and Abram drove them away. And when the sun was setting, a deep sleep fell upon Abram, and a great and darksome horror seized upon him. And when the sun was set, there arose a dark mist, and there appeared a smoking furnace, and a lamp of fire passing between those divisions. That day God made a covenant with Abram, saying:

To thy seed will I give this land, from the river to Egypt even to the great river Euphrates.

Responsorial Psalm 26:1, 7-9, 13-14 (Ps 27 NAB)
DR Challoner Text Only

The Lord is my light and my salvation, whom shall I fear?
The Lord is the protector of my life: of whom shall I be afraid?
Hear, O Lord, my voice, with which I have cried to thee: have mercy on me and hear me.
My heart hath said to thee: My face hath sought thee: thy face, O Lord, will I still seek.
Turn not away thy face from me; decline not in thy wrath from thy servant.
Be thou my helper, forsake me not; do not thou despise me, O God my Saviour.
I believe to see the good things of the Lord in the land of the living.
Expect the Lord, do manfully, and let thy heart take courage, and wait thou for the Lord.

Philippians 3:20—4:1
Haydock New Testament

But our conversation is in heaven: whence also we expect the Saviour, our Lord Jesus Christ, Who will reform the body of our lowness, made like to the body of his glory, according to the operation whereby also he is able to subdue all things unto himself.

Therefore, my brethren, dearly beloved, and most desired, my joy and my crown: so stand fast in the Lord, most beloved.

The Holy Gospel of Jesus Christ According to Saint Luke 9:28b-36
Haydock New Testament

Jesus took Peter, and James, and John, and went up into a mountain to pray. And whilst he prayed, the appearance of his countenance was altered: and his raiment became white and glittering. And behold two men were talking with him.  And they were Moses and Elias, Appearing in majesty: and they spoke of his decease, which he was to accomplish in Jerusalem.

But Peter, and they that were with him, were heavy with sleep.  And awaking, they saw his majesty, and the two men that stood with him. And it came to pass, that as they were departing from him, Peter saith to Jesus:

Master, it is good for us to be here: and let us make three tabernacles, one for thee, and one for Moses, and one for Elias:

not knowing what he said. And as he spoke these things, there came a cloud, and overshadowed them: and they were afraid, when they entered into the cloud. And a voice came out of the cloud, saying:

This is my beloved Son, hear him.

And whilst the voice was uttered, Jesus was found alone.  And they held their peace, and told no man in those days any of these things which they had seen.

Haydock Commentary Genesis 15:5-12, 17-18
Notes Copied From Haydock Commentary Site

  • Ver. 6. Reputed by God, who cannot judge wrong; so that Abram increased in justice by this act of faith, believing that his wife, now advanced in years, would have a child; from whom others should spring, more numerous than the stars of heaven.  H. — This faith was accompanied and followed by many other acts of virtue.  S. Jam. ii. 22.  W.
  • Ver. 8. Whereby, &c.  Thus the blessed Virgin asked, how shall this be done? Lu. i. 34. without the smallest degree of unbelief.  Abram wished to know, by what signs he should be declared the lawful owner of the land.  H.
  • Ver. 9. Three years, when these animals have obtained a perfect age.
  • Ver. 12. A deep sleep, or ecstasy, like that of Adam.  G. ii. 21, wherein God revealed to him the oppression of his posterity in Egypt, which filled him with such horror (M.) as we experience when something frightful comes upon us suddenly in the dark.  This darkness represents the dismal situation of Joseph, confined in a dungeon; and of the Hebrews condemned to hard labour, in making bricks, and obliged to hide their male children, for fear of their being discovered, and slain. Before these unhappy days commenced, the posterity of Abram were exposed to great oppression among the Chanaanites, nor could they in any sense be said to possess the land of promise, for above 400 years after this prophetic sleep.  H.
  • Ver. 17. A lamp, or symbol of the Divinity, passing, as Abram also did, between the divided beasts, to ratify the covenant.  See Jer. xxxiv. 18.
  • Ver. 18. Of Egypt, a branch of the Nile, not far from Pelusium.  This was to be the southern limit, and the Euphrates the northern; the two other boundaries are given, Num. xxxiv. — Perhaps Solomon’s empire extended so far.  At least, the Jews would have enjoyed these territories, if they had been faithful.  M.

Haydock Commentary Philippians 3:20—4:1

Nada

Haydock Commentary Luke 9:28b-36

  • Ver. 28. Mountain, &c. — Since Christ has ascended the mountain, both to pray and to be transfigured, all of us who hope for the fruit of his resurrection, and long to see the king in his glory, must dwell in heaven by our thoughts, and apply our minds to continual prayer.  Ven. Bede.
  • Ver. 30. And behold two men. Moses and Elias, by ministering to our Lord in his glory, shewed him to be the Lord of both the Old and New Testament.  The disciples also, upon seeing the glory of their fellow-creatures, would be filled with admiration at the condescension of their divine Master; and considering the delights of future happiness, be stirred up to a holy emulation of those who had laboured before them, and be fortified in their ensuing conflicts; for nothing so much lightens the present labour, as the consideration of the future recompense.  S. Cyril.
  • Ver. 31. They spoke of his decease,[2] or his departure out of this world. S. Peter useth the same Greek word for his death.  2 Pet. i. 15.  Wi.
  • Ver. 33. It is good for us. It is not good, O Peter, for Christ to remain always.  Should he have remained there, the promise he had made thee would never have been fulfilled.  Thou wouldst never have obtained the keys of the kingdom of heaven, and the reign of death would not have been destroyed.  Seek not for joys before the time, as Adam sought to be made like God.  The time will come, when thou shalt for eternity behold him, and reign with him who is life and light.  Damasus Orat. de Transfigurat. Domini. — Three tabernacles. The Lord does appoint thee the builder, not of tabernacles, but of his whole Church.  Thy disciples, thy sheep, have fulfilled thy desire, by erecting tabernacles for Christ and his faithful servants.  These words of S. Peter, let us make, &c. were not spoken of himself, but by the prophetic inspiration of the Holy Ghost.  Therefore it is added, he knew not what he said.  Damasus, ut supra. — S. Peter knew not what he said, because by proposing to make three tabernacles for these three personages, he improperly ranked together, the servants and their Lord, the creature and the Creator.  Titus Bostrensis.
  • Ver. 35. And a voice, &c.  This is the voice of the Father from the cloud, as if he should say, “I call him not one of my sons, but my true and natural Son, to the resemblance of whom all others are adopted.  S. Cyril. — Not Elias, not Moses, but he whom you see alone, is my beloved Son.  S. Ambrose. — Therefore, it is added: and when the voice was heard, Jesus was alone, lest any one should imagine these words, This is my beloved Son, were addressed to Moses or Elias.”  Theophylact.

Daily Scripture Readings Tuesday February 23 2010 1st Week of Lent

February 23 2010 Tuesday First Week of Lent
Saint of the Day – St. Polycarp

About the sources used. The readings on this site are not official for the Mass of Roman Rite of the Catholic Church in the USA, but are from sources free from copyright. They are here to present the comparable readings alongside traditional Catholic commentary as published in the Haydock Bible for your own personal study. Readings vary depending on your local calendar.

Official Readings of the Liturgy at – http://www.usccb.org/nab/

Isaiah 55:10-11
Douay-Rheims Challoner

And as the rain and the snow come down from heaven, and return no more thither, but soak the earth, and water it, and make it to spring, and give seed to the sower, and bread to the eater: So shall my word be, which shall go forth from my mouth: it shall not return to me void, but it shall do whatsoever I please, and shall prosper in the things for which I sent it.

Responsorial Psalm 33:4-7, 16-19 (Ps 34 NAB)
DR Challoner Text Only

O magnify the Lord with me; and let us extol his name together.
I sought the Lord, and he heard me; and he delivered me from all my troubles.
Come ye to him and be enlightened: and your faces shall not be confounded.
This poor man cried, and the Lord heard him: and saved him out of all his troubles.
The eyes of the Lord are upon the just: and his ears unto their prayers.
But the countenance of the Lord is against them that do evil things:
to cut off the remembrance of them from the earth.
The just cried, and the Lord heard them: and delivered them out of all their troubles.
The Lord is nigh unto them that are of a contrite heart: and he will save the humble of spirit.

The Holy Gospel of Jesus Christ According to Saint Matthew 6:7-15
Haydock New Testament

Jesus said:

And when you are praying, speak not much, as the heathens do: for they think that they shall be heard for their much speaking. Be not you therefore like them.  For your Father knoweth what you stand in need of, before you ask him. You therefore shall pray in this manner:

Our Father who art in heaven, hallowed be thy name.
Thy kingdom come.  Thy will be done on earth as it is in heaven.
Give us this day our supersubstantial bread.
And forgive us our debts, as we also forgive our debtors.
And lead us not into temptation.  But deliver us from evil.  Amen.

For if you forgive men their offences, your heavenly Father will forgive you also your offences. But if you will not forgive men, neither will your Father forgive you your offences.

Haydock Commentary Isaiah 55:10-11
Notes Copied From Haydock Commentary Site

  • Ver. 11. Sent it. I will assuredly bring you from Babylon; and the rain shall sooner return upwards than I will break my promise.

Haydock Commentary Matthew 6:7-15

  • Ver. 7. Long prayer is not here forbidden; for Christ himself spent whole nights in prayer: and he sayeth, we must pray always; and the apostle, that we must pray without intermission, 1 Thess. v.; and the holy Church hath had from the beginning her canonical hours for prayer, but rhetorical and elaborate prayer, as if we thought to persuade God by our eloquence, is forbidden; the collects of the Church are most brief and most effectual.  Aug. ep. 121. c. viii, ix, x.  B. — Perseverance in prayer is recommended us by the example of the poor widow, who by her importunity prevailed over the unjust judge.  Chry. hom. xix. — The Greek word means, to babble or trifle.
  • Ver. 9. As God is the common Father of all, we pray for all.  Let none fear on account of their lowly station here, for all are comprised in the same heavenly nobility. . . By saying, “who art in heaven,” he does not mean to insinuate that he is there only, but he wishes to withdraw the humble petitioner from earth, and fix his attention on heaven.  Chry. hom. xx.  Other prayers are not forbidden.  Jesus Christ prayed in different words (John, c. viii.), and the apostles; (Acts i, 24,) but this is an example of the simple style to be used in prayer, and is applicable to all occasions. — Hallowed be thy name, from the word holy, be held and kept holy, be glorified by us, and that not only by our words, but principally by the lives we lead.  The honour and glory of God should be the principal subject of our prayers, and the ultimate end of our every action; every other thing must be subordinate to this.  A.
  • Ver. 10. Those who desire to arrive at the kingdom of heaven, must endeavour so to order their life and conversation, as if they were already conversing in heaven.  This petition is also to be understood for the accomplishment of the divine will in every part of the world, for the extirpation of error, and explosion of vice, that truth and virtue may everywhere obtain, and heaven and earth differ no more in honouring the supreme majesty of God.  Chry. hom. xx.
  • Ver. 11. Our supersubstantial bread.[2]  So it is at present in the Latin text: yet the same Greek word in S. Luke, is translated daily bread, as we say it in our Lord’s prayer, and as it was used to be said in the second or third age, as we find by Tertullian and S. Cyprian.  Perhaps the Latin word, supersubstantialis, may bear the same sense as daily bread, or bread that we daily stand in need of; for it need not be taken for supernatural bread, but for bread which is daily added, to maintain and support the substance of our bodies.  Wi. — In S. Luke the same word is rendered daily bread. It is understood of the bread of life, which we receive in the blessed sacrament.  Ch. — It is also understood of the supernatural support of the grace of God, and especially of the bread of life received in the blessed eucharist.  A. — As we are only to pray for our daily bread, we are not to be over solicitous for the morrow, nor for the things of this earth, but being satisfied with what is necessary, turn all our thoughts to the joys of heaven.  Chry. hom. xx.
  • Ver. 12. Of all the petitions this alone is repeated twice.  God puts our judgment in our own hands, that none might complain, being the author of his own sentence.  He could have forgiven us our sins without this condition, but he consulted our good, in affording us opportunities of practising daily the virtues of piety and mildness.  Chry. hom. xx. — These debts signify not only mortal but venial sins, as S. Augustine often teaches.  Therefore every man, be he ever so just, yet because he cannot live without venial sin, ought to say this prayer.  Cont. 2 epis. Pelag. l. i. c. 14. — l. xxi. de civit. Dei. c. xxvii.  B.
  • Ver. 13. God is not the tempter of evil, or author of sin.  James i. 13.  He tempteth no man: we pray that he would not suffer the devil to tempt us above our strength: that he would remove the temptations, or enable us to overcome them, and deliver us from evil, particularly the evil of sin, which is the first, and the greatest, and the true efficient cause of all evils.  A. — In the Greek we here read, for thine is the kingdom, and the power, and the glory; which words are found in some old Greek liturgies, and there is every appearance that they have thence slipped into the text of S. Matt.  They do not occur in S. Luke (vi. 4.), nor in any one of the old Latin copies, nor yet in the most ancient of the Greek texts.  The holy Fathers prior to S. Chrysostom, as Grotius observes, who have explained the Lord’s prayer, never mention these words. — And not being found in Tertullian, S. Cyprian, S. Jerom, S. Ambrose, S. Augustine, &c., nor in the Vatican Greek copy, nor in the Cambridge MSS. &c. as Dr. Wells also observes, it seems certain that they were only a pious conclusion, or doxology, with which the Greeks in the fourth age began to conclude their prayers, much after the same manner as, Glory be to the Father, &c. was added to the end of each psalm.  We may reasonably presume, that these words at first were in the margin of some copies, and afterwards by some transcribers taken into the text itself.  Wi.
  • Ver. 14. Here he again recommendeth the forgiving of others, as the means of obtaining forgiveness.  A.