Sunday Scripture Readings October 3 2010 27th Sunday in Ordinary Time

October 3 2010 Twenty Seventh Sunday in Ordinary Time
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Habakukk 1:2-3; 2:2-4
Douay-Rheims Challoner

How long, O Lord, shall I cry, and thou wilt not hear? shall I cry out to thee suffering violence, and thou wilt not save? Why hast thou shewn me iniquity and grievance, to see rapine and injustice before me? and there is a judgment, but opposition is more powerful.

And the Lord answered me, and said:

Write the vision, and make it plain upon tables: that he that readeth it may run over it. For as yet the vision is far off, and it shall appear at the end, and shall not lie: if it make any delay, wait for it: for it shall surely come, and it shall not be slack. Behold, he that is unbelieving, his soul shall not be right in himself: but the just shall live in his faith.

Responsorial Psalm 94:1-2, 6-9 (Ps 95 NAB)
DR Challoner Text Only

Come let us praise the Lord with joy:
let us joyfully sing to God our saviour.
Let us come before his presence with thanksgiving;
and make a joyful noise to him with psalms.
Come let us adore and fall down:
and weep before the Lord that made us.
For he is the Lord our God:
and we are the people of his pasture and the sheep of his hand.
To day if you shall hear his voice, harden not your hearts:
As in the provocation, according to the day of temptation in the wilderness:
where your fathers tempted me, they proved me, and saw my works.

2 Timothy 1:6-8, 13-14
Haydock NT

For which cause I admonish thee, that thou stir up the grace of God, which is in thee, by the imposition of my hands. For God hath not given us the spirit of fear: but of power, and of love, and of sobriety. Be not thou, therefore, ashamed of the testimony of our Lord, nor of me, his prisoner: but labour with the gospel, according to the power of God:

Hold the form of sound words, which thou hast heard of me in faith, and in the love which is in Christ Jesus. Keep the good deposit by the Holy Ghost, who dwelleth in us.

The Holy Gospel of Jesus Christ According to Saint Luke 17:5-10
Haydock New Testament

And the apostles said to the Lord;

Increase our faith.

And the Lord said;

If you had faith like to a grain of mustard-seed, you might say to this mulberry-tree; Be thou rooted up, and be transplanted into the sea, and it shall obey you.

But which of you having a servant ploughing or feeding cattle, will say to him when he is come from the field: Immediately go, sit down to table: And will not rather say to him: Make ready my supper, and gird thyself, and serve me whilst I eat and drink, and afterwards thou shalt eat and drink?

Doth he thank that servant, because he did the things which he commanded him? I think not.  So you also, when you shall have done all the things that are commanded you, say: We are unprofitable servants: we have done that which we ought to do.

Haydock Commentary Habakukk 1:2-3; 2:2-4
Notes Copied From Haydock Commentary Site

  • Ver.  2. Save. Some think that he expresses the sentiments of the weak, like David, (Ps. lxxii. 2.) or what he had formerly entertained.  The language of the prophets is very bold.  Ex. xxxii. 32.  Job iii. 3.  Jer. xx. 14.  Jon. iv. 8.  C.
  • Ver.  3. Opposition. Sept. “the judge receives” bribes.  H. — Such was the state of Juda after Josias.  Jer. xxi. 12.
  • HABACUC 2
  • CHAPTER II.
  • Ver. 2. Over it. It shall be so legible (H.) anyone may hear or take a copy.  C.
  • Ver.  3. Slack. That which happens at the time fixed is not.  W. — Heb. “the vision is for an appointed time.”  Habacuc might live to see the conquest and downfall of Nabuchodonosor.  Many think that the first and second coming of Christ (Heb. x. 36.  Rom. i. 17.) are here insinuated, as the dominion of the aforesaid king represented the slavery of mankind under the devil, and the liberty granted by Cyrus was a type of their redemption.  The felicity of the Jews is the last event which the prophet specifies, and this is here the literal sense.  S. Cyr.  C.
  • Ver. 4. Unbelieving. Prot. “lifted up.”  H. — The king’s vain projects shall fail.  Sept. Rom. “If he withdraw himself, my soul shall not have pleasure in him.  But my just man shall live by my faith.”  Others read with S. Paul, “my just man shall live by faith.”  Heb. x. 38.  C. — The source of content arises from faith, (without which this life would be a sort of death, as the apostle and S. Aug. Trin. xiv. 12. &c. observe) because it is the beginning of life by grace, which the works of the law could not otherwise confer.  Gal. iii.  W. — The Heb. will admit the sense of the Sept. and we ought rather to shew this in passages which the authors of the New Testament quote, than to excuse them.  Here their version seems preferable to that given by moderns, ecce elata est, non recta anima ejus in eo, the drift of which who can guess?  Beza has acted unfairly, “at si quis se subduxerit non est gratum animo meo;” whereas the text speaks of the “just man,” as Theophylactus observes.  “Hence all who know his theological opinions, may see how suspicious his translation must be accounted.”  Pearson. pref. Sept.  H.

Haydock Commentary 2 Timothy 1:6-8, 13-14

  • Ver. 6. That thou stir up[2] the grace of God. In the Greek is a metaphor for fire that is blown up again. — Which is in thee by the imposition of my hands, when thou wast ordained bishop.  Wi. — The grace, which S. Paul here exhorts Timothy to stir up in him, was the grace he had received by imposition of hands, either in his confirmation, or at receiving the sacrament of orders, being a bishop.  This verse seems to shew that the imposition of hands is used in these two sacraments, as the essential matter of the sacraments, being the instrumental cause of the grace therein conferred.  Dion. Carthus.
  • Ver. 7. Of fear.[3]  Of a cowardly fear, and want of courage. — Of sobriety.[4]  Though the Protestants here translate of a sound mind, yet they translate the same Greek word by sobriety in divers other places, as Acts xxvi. 25.  1 Tim. ii. 9 and 15. and c. iii. 2. Tit. i. 8. &c.  Wi.
  • Ver. 8. Labour with[5] the gospel. That is, labour with me in preaching, &c.  Or by the Greek, be partner with me in suffering.  Wi.
  • Ver. 14. Keep the good (doctrine) deposited or committed[7] in trust to thee. This is different, though the word be the same, from what he spoke of, v. 12.  There he mentioned what he had committed and deposited in the hands of God; here he speaks of what God hath committed, and deposited in the hands of Timothy, after it was delivered to him by S. Paul and the other preachers of the gospel: that is, he speaks of the care Timothy must take to preserve the same sound doctrine, and to teach it to others.  See 1 Tim. vi. 20.  Wi.

Haydock Commentary Luke 17:5-10

  • Ver. 5. Increase our faith. The disciples having heard our Saviour inculcating maxims hard to flesh and blood, such as avoiding scandal, and forgiving our enemies, humbly beg their faith may be increased, that they may be able to comply with these maxims; for they had heard Christ say, that every thing was possible to him that believed.  Theophy. — Christ compares faith to a grain of mustard seed; because, though the grain be small, it is nevertheless stronger than most herbs.  S. Chrysos.
  • Ver. 6. To this mulberry-tree. In S. Matthew, (xvii. 19.) we read, to this mountain. Christ might say both at different times.  Wi.
  • Ver. 7. The design and end of this parable is to shew that, rigorously speaking, we are useless servants with regard to God.  This sovereign Master has a right to exact of us every kind of service, and to make us apply ourselves to any task he may think proper, without our having any reason to complain either of the difficulty, trouble, or length of our labours; we are entirely his, and he is master of our persons, time, and talents.  We hold of him whatever we possess, and wo to us if we abuse his trust, by applying our talents to any use contrary to his designs.  But though he be Lord and Master, he leaves our liberty entire.  If he produces in us holy desires, if he works in us meritorious actions, gives us virtuous inclinations and supernatural gifts, he sets to our account the good use we make of them; and in crowning our merits, he crowns his own gifts.  S. Aug. lib. ix. Confes. and Serm. 131.  Calmet.
  • Ver. 10. Unprofitable servants. Because our service is of no profit to our Master; and he justly claims it as our bounden duty.  But though we are unprofitable to him, our serving him is not unprofitable to us; for he is pleased to give, by his grace, a value to our good works, which, in consequence of his promise, entitles them to an eternal reward.  Ch. — The word useless, when joined to servant, generally means a servant from whom his master does not derive the service he has a right to expect; as in S. Matt. xxv. 30.  Here the word is taken in a less odious sense.  It means a servant who does not testify sufficient zeal and ardour in his master’s service, who is not very eager to please him.  With regard to God, we are always useless servants, because he wants not our services; and without his assistance, we can neither undertake nor finish any thing to please him.  Calmet.
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Daily Scripture Readings Tuesday September 28 2010 26th Week in Ordinary Time

September 28 2010 Tuesday Twenty Fifth Week in Ordinary Time
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Job 3:1-3, 11-17, 20-23
Douay-Rheims Challoner

After this, Job opened his mouth, and cursed his day, And he said:

Let the day perish wherein I was born, and the night in which it was said: A man child is conceived. Why did I not die in the womb? why did I not perish when I came out of the belly? Why received upon the knees? why suckled at the breasts?

For now I should have been asleep and still, and should have rest in my sleep: With kings and consuls of the earth, who build themselves solitudes: Or with princes, that possess gold, and fill their houses with silver: Or as a hidden untimely birth, I should not be; or as they that, being conceived, have not seen the light.

There the wicked cease from tumult, and there the wearied in strength are at rest. Why is light given to him that is in misery, and life to them that are in bitterness of soul? That look for death, and it cometh not, as they that dig for a treasure: And they rejoice exceedingly when they have found the grave? To a man whose way is hidden, and God hath surrounded him with darkness?

Responsorial Psalm 87:2-8 (Ps 88 NAB)
DR Challoner Text Only

O Lord, the God of my salvation:
I have cried in the day,
and in the night before thee.
Let my prayer come in before thee:
incline thy ear to my petition.
For my soul is filled with evils:
and my life hath drawn nigh to hell.
I am counted among them that go down to the pit:
I am become as a man without help,
Free among the dead.
Like the slain sleeping in the sepulchres,
whom thou rememberest no more:
and they are cut off from thy hand.
They have laid me in the lower pit:
in the dark places, and in the shadow of death.
Thy wrath is strong over me:
and all thy waves thou hast brought in upon me.

The Holy Gospel of Jesus Christ According to Saint Luke 9:51-56
Haydock New Testament

And it came to pass when the days of his assumption were being accomplished, that he steadfastly set his face to go to Jerusalem. And he sent messengers before his face: and going, they entered into a city of the Samaritans to prepare for him. And they received him not, because his face was of one going to Jerusalem. And when his disciples, James and John, had seen this, they said:

Lord, wilt thou that we command fire to come down from heaven and consume them?

And turning, he rebuked them, saying:

You know not of what spirit you are. The Son of man came not to destroy souls, but to save. And they went into another town.

Haydock Commentary Job 3:1-3, 11-17, 20-23
Notes Copied From Haydock Commentary Site

  • Ver. 1. Cursed his day. Job cursed the day of his birth, not by way of wishing evil to any thing of God’s creation; but only to express in a stronger manner his sense of human miseries in general, and of his own calamities in particular.  Ch. — He has these only in view: though, in another light, it is better for a man to be born, and to undergo any misery, that he may obtain eternal rewards.  H. — Some allowances  must be made for extreme pain, and for the style of the Eastern (C.) poetry.  H. — Jeremias, (xx. 14.) Habacuc, (i. 2.) the psalmist, and even our Saviour in his agony, made use of such strong expressions.  Mat. xxvi. 39. and xxvii. 46.  Some heretics accuse Job of impatience and blasphemy.  The devil, therefore came off with victory; and the praises given to Job’s patience are false.  He might offend by some degree of exaggeration.  C. — But even that is by no means clear.  Time past could not be recalled, nor receive any injury by the maledictions.  H.
  • Ver. 11. In the. Heb. “from the womb,” (H.) or as soon as I was born.  C. — He seems to have lost sight of original sin, (v. 1.) or there might be some method of having it remitted to children unborn, which we do not know.  H.
  • Ver. 12. Knees, by my father or grandfather.  Gen. xxx 3.  Iliad ix.  C.
  • Ver. 13. Sleep. So death is often styled.
  • Olli dura quies oculos et ferreus urget
  • Somnus: in æternam clauduntur lumina noctem. Æneid x.
  • Ver. 14. Consuls. Heb. “counsellors,” or any in great authority.  Sept. “kings, the counsellors of the land, who rejoiced, boasting of their swords.”  The same word, choraboth, (H.) means both swords and solitudes.  D. — Those great ones had prepared their own tombs, which were usually in solitary places; (C.) or they had filled all with their extensive palaces; and removed the people to a distance.  H.
  • Ver. 15. Houses, while alive; (C.) or their tombs were thus enriched with silver, (M.) as this practice was not uncommon, v. 22.  Joseph. xiii. 15. — Marcian forbade it.  S. Chrys. complains it subsisted in his time.  Orat. Annæ.  C.
  • Ver. 16. Light; dying in the womb.  He expresses a desire that he had been thus prevented from feeling his present miseries and danger of sin.  H.
  • Ver. 17. Tumult. In the grave they can no longer disturb the world.  M. — In strength. Sept. “in body.”  Both heroes and labourers then find rest, (C.) if they have lived virtuously.  H.
  • Ver. 21. Not. The feel the same eagerness for death as those who seek for a treasure; (C.) and when death is at hand, they rejoice no less than those who discover a grave, in which they hope to find some riches, v. 15. 22.
  • Ver. 22. Grave, full of stores, or the place where they may repose.  H.
  • Ver. 23. To. Why is life given to? &c.  The uncertainty whether a man be worthy of love or hatred, (EcclI. ix. 1.) and whether he will persevere to the end, is what fills Job with distress; though we must trust that God will suffer none to be tempted above their strength.  1 Cor. x. 13. — He finds himself surrounded with precipices, and in the dark.  C. — So God often tries this faithful servants. D.

Haydock Commentary Luke 9:51-56

  • Ver. 51. The days of his assumption, i.e. of his ascension into heaven.  See the same Greek word in Mar. xvi. 19. and Acts i. 11. He steadfastly set his face to go to Jerusalem, or literally, he fixed[3] his countenance to go up to Jerusalem. And (v. 53.) because his face was of one going to Jerusalem. These expressions come from the style of the Hebrews.  See 4 Kings xii. 17.  Jerem. xlii. 15.  Ezech. iv. 3.  The sense is, that the Samaritans perceived that he and  his company were going up to adore in Jerusalem, at which they were displeased, having an antipathy against the Jews and their temple.  Wi. It is not here said, as some interpreters have believed, that his journey to Jerusalem was the last of his life, in which he was crucified.  It appears from the context, that there were still many months before the death of Christ, and that this journey was probably for the feast of Pentecost.  But that year was the last of the life of Jesus Christ and he already knew the dispositions of the Jews, and what was to befall him shortly.  These words, he set his face, are often used in Scripture for obstinacy and hardness in evil.  Prov. vii. 13. 12. 29.  Jeremy xlii. 15. &c.  But we may likewise take them to signify a strong resolution, and intrepid and inflexible firmness, to perform what you have resolved.  Jesus Christ shewed by his air, by his conduct and discourse, that notwithstanding the malice of his enemies, he was determined to go to Jerusalem.  Calmet.
  • Ver. 52. Messengers, &c.  S. Jerom believes that Christ sent true angels before him to announce  his coming.  The Greek word aggeloV, generally signifies an angel; but it likewise means a messenger.  Most interpreters believe he sent James and John, to prepare what was necessary for provisions and lodging.  This precaution was necessary, as he was always followed by great crowds.  The history, from verse 51 to the end of the chapter, is mentioned by none of the evangelists, except S. Luke.  Calmet.
  • Ver. 54. Wilt thou that we command fire, &c.  In the Greek is added as Elias did. These words might be first in the margin, and thence by transcribers taken into the text.  The two apostles, called the sons of thunder, knew their Master was greater than Elias; and therefore they are for calling for fire from heaven, as he had done.  Wi. It was probably this trait in the life of James and John, which gained t hem the name of boanerges, the sons of thunder.  Their too great zeal for the glory of Jesus Christ, and the spirit of revenge, of which they were not yet healed, caused them to make this petition; which seemed in some manner justified by the example of Elias, 4th book of Kings, chap. i. 10.  Many editions have the addition of these words, as Elias did. Calmet.
  • Ver. 55. You know not of what spirit you are, i.e. that my Spirit, which you ought to follow, is the Spirit of mercy, mildness, and patience.  Wi.
  • Ver. 56. But to save souls.  It might be translated, to save men’s lives;[4] but is seems better here to stick to the letter, especially since in most Greek copies we read, the souls of men. Wi.

Daily Scripture Readings Saturday September 25 2010 25th Week in Ordinary Time

September 25 2010 Saturday Twenty Fifth Week in Ordinary Time
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Ecclesiastes 11:9—12:8
Douay-Rheims Challoner

Rejoice therefore, O young man, in thy youth,
and let thy heart be in that which is good in the days of thy youth,
and walk in the ways of thy heart, and in the sight of thy eyes:
and know that for all these God will bring thee into judgment.

Remove anger from thy heart, and put away evil from thy flesh.
For youth and pleasure are vain.

Remember thy Creator in the days of thy youth, before the time of affliction come,
and the years draw nigh of which thou shalt say: They please me not:

Before the sun, and the light, and the moon,
and the stars be darkened, and the clouds return after the rain:

When the keepers of the house shall tremble,
and the strong men shall stagger, and the grinders shall be idle in a small number,
and they that look through the holes shall be darkened:

And they shall shut the doors in the street, when the grinder’s voice shall be low,
and they shall rise up at the voice of the bird, and all the daughters of music shall grow deaf.

And they shall fear high things, and they shall be afraid in the way,
the almond tree shall flourish, the locust shall be made fat,
and the caper tree shall be destroyed:
because man shall go into the house of his eternity,
and the mourners shall go round about in the street.

Before the silver cord be broken, and the golden fillet shrink back,
and the pitcher be crushed at the fountain, and the wheel be broken upon the cistern,

And the dust return into its earth, from whence it was,
and the spirit return to God, who gave it.

Vanity of vanities, said Ecclesiastes, and all things are vanity.

Responsorial Psalm 89:3-6, 12-14 and 17 (Ps 90 NAB/Hebrew)
DR Challoner Text Only

Turn not man away to be brought low: and thou hast said:
Be converted, O ye sons of men.
For a thousand years in thy sight are as yesterday, which is past.
And as a watch in the night,
Things that are counted nothing, shall their years be.
In the morning man shall grow up like grass;
in the morning he shall flourish and pass away:
in the evening he shall fall, grow dry, and wither.
Can number thy wrath? So make thy right hand known:
and men learned in heart, in wisdom.
Return, O Lord, how long?
and be entreated in favour of thy servants.
We are filled in the morning with thy mercy:
and we have rejoiced, and are delighted all our days.
And let the brightness of the Lord our God be upon us:
and direct thou the works of our hands over us;
yea, the work of our hands do thou direct.

The Holy Gospel of Jesus Christ According to Saint Luke 9:43b-45
Haydock New Testament
Verse numbering varies.

And all were astonished at the mighty power of God: But while they all wondered at all the things he did, he said to his disciples:

Lay you up in your hearts these words: for it shall come to pass, that the Son of man shall be delivered into the hands of men.

But they understood not this word, and it was hid from them, so that they perceived it not. And they were afraid to ask him concerning this word.

Haydock Commentary Ecclesiastes 11:9—12:8
Notes Copied From Haydock Commentary Site

  • Ver. 9. Eyes. He speaks ironically, (C.) or exhorts to spiritual joy and moderation.  S. Greg. Mor. xxiv.
  • Ver. 10. Anger. All turbulent passions, and evil or carnal pleasures.  S. Jer.
  • ECCLESIASTES 12
  • CHAPTER XII.
  • Ver. 1. Not. Prevent old age, to procure a stock of virtues.  H. — Solomon refutes the former sentiments of the wicked, which he had perhaps once entertained.  C.
  • Ver. 2. Before the sun, &c.  That is, before old age: the effects of which upon all the senses and faculties are described in the following verses, under a variety of figures.  Ch. — All are exhorted to live well, before death come to deprive them of their senses and all helps: and to continue in expectation of judgment, the signs of which are given, as Matt. xxiv.  W.  S. Jer. — Rain. One misery succeeds another, the understanding is darkened, and the senses become dull.  C. — The Jews explain v. 2. 7. of the future distress of their nation under captivity.  S. Jer.  H.
  • Ver. 3. House. The sides, (S. Jer.) or rather the arms.  C. — Some understand prelates, or angels.  Thaumat. — And the powers that are in heaven shall be moved. Mar. xiii. 25.  H. — Men. The arms, (Chal.) or thighs, (Smith) or those who were formerly the most robust. — Number. The rest have been lost, and what remain are of little service for chewing meat.  C. — Holes. Spectacles, (Geier) as if they had been already in use.  C. — Heb. “windows.”  H.
  • Ver. 4. Doors. The lips, (C.) feet, (Chal.) nostrils, (Vat.) or the trachea and pulmonary arteries. — Bird. The cock-crowing; or at the least sound their slumbers are broken. — Deaf. Heb. “be low.”  The ears cannot enjoy music, nor can the voice of the old people please.  2 K. xix. 25.
  • Ver. 5. Way. They shall walk bent down, and afraid of rough ground. — Flourish. Their head shall become white, like the almond-flower.  Jer. i. 11. — Fat. Sept. “heavy.” — Destroyed. The hair shall fall off.  C. — Concupiscence shall be extinct.  Vat.  T. — Eternity. The body being consigned to the grave, and the soul to the region of spirits, to have no farther concern with the transactions of the world.  H.  Job vii. 9. — Street. This custom is often mentioned.  Herod. ii. 85.  Lu. vii. 32. — The women dance, having one (C.) or two old people disfigured in the midst of them, to recount the actions of the deceased.  Brun.
  • Ver. 6. Cord. The nerves. — Fillet. Veins, or the spermatic vessels, (C.) and the soul.  S. Jer. — Cistern. When the bladder, &c. become disordered.  Num. xxiv. 7.  C.
  • Ver. 7. It. Man is composed of two distinct parts; the destination of which we ought never to forget.  Thus the objection of infidels (c. iii. 19.) is refuted.  Plato and some of the ancients had the same idea of the soul’s spiritual nature; though some took it to be an aerial body.  C.
  • Ver. 8. Ecclesiastes. “The preacher.”  W. — He returns to his first proposition, and having pushed the objection of free-thinkers as far as possible, shews us what we ought to believe and practise.  He establishes the distinction of soul and body, the advantage of instruction, (v. 11.) without meddling with things too high, (v. 12.) the obligation of fearing God, (v. 13.) and future retribution.  v. 14.  This is the sum of all sound morality.  C.

Haydock Commentary Luke 9:44-45

  • Ver. 45. They understood not this word. They understood well enough what was meant by being delivered into the hands of his enemies, and being put to death; but they could not comprehend  how Jesus Christ, whom they knew to be the Messias, and the Son of God, and whom they believed to be immortal, and eternal, could suffer death, or affronts and outrages from men.  These ideas seemed incompatible; they perceived in them some mystery, which they could not penetrate.  Calmet.

Daily Scripture Readings Friday September 24 2010 25th Week in Ordinary Time

September 24 2010 Friday Twenty Fifth Week in Ordinary Time
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Ecclesiastes 3:1-11
Douay-Rheims Challoner

All things have their season, and in their times all things pass under heaven.
A time to be born and a time to die. A time to plant, and a time to pluck up that which is planted.
A time to kill, and a time to heal. A time to destroy, and a time to build.
A time to weep, and a time to laugh. A time to mourn, and a time to dance.
A time to scatter stones, and a time to gather. A time to embrace, and a time to be far from embraces.
A time to get, and a time to lose. A time to keep, and a time to cast away.
A time to rend, and a time to sew. A time to keep silence, and a time to speak.
A time of love, and a time of hatred. A time of war, and a time of peace.
What hath man more of his labour?
I have seen the trouble, which God hath given the sons of men to be exercised in it.
He hath made all things good in their time, and hath delivered the world to their consideration, so that man cannot find out the work which God hath made from the beginning to the end.

Responsorial Psalm 143:1b and 2abc, 3-4
DR Challoner

Blessed be the Lord my God.
My mercy, and my refuge:
my support, and my deliverer:
My protector, and I have hoped in him.
Lord, what is man,
that thou art made known to him?
or the son of man,
that thou makest account of him?
Man is like to vanity:
his days pass away like a shadow.

The Holy Gospel of Jesus Christ According to Saint Luke 9:18-22
Haydock New Testament

And it came to pass, as he was alone praying, his disciples also were with him: and he asked them, saying;

Whom do the people say that I am?

But they answered, and said:

John the Baptist: but some say Elias; and others say, that one of the former prophets is risen again.

And he said to them:

But whom do you say that I am?

Simon Peter answering, said:

The Christ of God.

But he strictly charging them, commanded they should tell this to no man, Saying:

The Son of man must suffer many things, and be rejected by the ancients, and chief priests, and Scribes, and be killed, and rise again the third day.

Haydock Commentary Ecclesiastes 3:1-11
Notes Copied From Haydock Commentary Site

  • Ver. 1. Heaven, in this world, where alone things change.  S. Jer. — Nothing is here perpetual, but to be used in a proper manner.  W. — The heart must not be attached to any thing created.  C. — Pleasure had been condemned and approved.  C. 2.  He shews that all must have its time. M.
  • Ver. 5. Stones, with a sling, or to render a field useless.  4 K. iii. 25.  Is. v. 2. — Embraces. Countenance was sometimes prescribed for married people.  Lev. xx. 18. and 1 Cor. vii.  S. Jer.   S. Aug. Ench. 78.  C. — Hatred often succeeds love.  v. 8. and 2 K. xiii. 14.  H.
  • Ver. 9. Labour? What advantage does he derive from any of these things?  C. i. 3.  C.
  • Ver. 11. Consideration. Lit. “dispute.”  Heb. and Sept. “heart.”  H. — Pagn. “He has implanted the desire of immortality in their hearts.” — End. If we could discover the properties of each thing, we should be in raptures; (C.) but as we cannot, this increases our vexation.  M.

Haydock Commentary Luke 9:18-22

  • Ver. 18. As he was alone praying: i.e. remote from the people, though his disciples are said to have been with him. Wi.

Missing Readings

I’m sorry for missing so many readings. Things have been very busy here lately and sometimes I simply forget to post the readings. As of now, with a few exceptions due to the way Holy Days fit on the calendar and a couple of computer problems in the past, the 3 year cycle of Sunday readings and the 2 year daily cycle are pretty much done and published on this site. I’m mainly copying and reformatting older posts. It wasn’t until around the spring of 2008 that the files took on the basic format that they’re in now and many of the original files were lost, surviving only as blog posts.

I may have to step back from this for now, although the Sunday readings should not be a problem. It’s the  daily readings that are the main issue. If you don’t see the daily readings as regularly as before at least you’ll know the reason. God bless you all.

Sunday Scripture Readings September 26 2010 26th Sunday in Ordinary Time

September 26 2010 Twenty Sixth Sunday in Ordinary Time
Disclaimer – Official Readings of the Liturgy at – http://www.usccb.org/nab/

Amos 6:1a,4-7
Douay-Rheims Challoner

Woe to you that are wealthy in Sion; You that sleep upon beds of ivory, and are wanton on your couches: that eat the lambs out of the flock, and the calves out of the midst of the herd; You that sing to the sound of the psaltery: they have thought themselves to have instruments of music like David; That drink wine in bowls, and anoint themselves with the best ointments: and they are not concerned for the affliction of Joseph.

Wherefore now they shall go captive at the head of them that go into captivity: and the faction of the luxurious ones shall be taken away.

Responsorial Psalm 145:7, 8-9, 9-10 (Ps 146 NAB)
DR Challoner Text Only

Blessed is he
Who keepeth truth for ever:
who executeth judgment for them that suffer wrong:
who giveth food to the hungry.
The Lord looseth them that are fettered:

The Lord enlighteneth the blind.
The Lord lifteth up them that are cast down:
the Lord loveth the just.

The Lord keepeth the strangers,
he will support the fatherless and the widow:
and the ways of sinners he will destroy.

The Lord shall reign for ever:
thy God, O Sion, unto generation and generation.

1 Timothy 6:11-16
Haydock New Testament

But thou, O man of God, fly these things: and pursue justice, piety, faith, charity, patience, meekness. Fight the good fight of faith, lay hold on eternal life whereunto thou art called, and hast confessed a good confession before many witnesses.

I charge thee before God, who quickeneth all things, and before Christ Jesus, who gave testimony under Pontius Pilate, a good confession: That thou keep the commandment without spot, blameless, unto the coming of our Lord Jesus Christ: Which in his times he shall shew, who is the Blessed and only Mighy, the King of kings, and Lord of lords: Who only hath immortality, and inhabiteth light inaccessible, whom no man hath seen, nor can see: to whom be honour and empire everlasting. Amen.

The Holy Gospel of Jesus Christ According to Saint Luke 16:19-31
Haydock New Testament

There was a certain rich man, who was clothed in purple and fine linen: and feasted sumptuously every day. And there was a certain beggar, by name Lazarus, who lay at his gate, full of sores, Desiring to be filled with the crumbs that fell from the rich man’s table; and no one did give him: moreover, the dogs came and licked his sores.

And it came to pass that the beggar died, and he was carried by the Angels into Abraham’s bosom. And the rich man also died: and he was buried in hell. And lifting up his eyes when he was in torments, he saw Abraham afar off, and Lazarus in his bosom: And he cried, and said:

Father Abraham, have mercy on me, and send Lazarus, that he may dip the tip of his finger in water, to cool my tongue, for I am tormented in this flame.

And Abraham said to him:

Son, remember that thou didst receive good things in thy life-time, and likewise Lazarus evil things: but now he is comforted, and thou art tormented. And besides all this, between us and you there is fixed a great chaos: so that they who would pass from hence to you, cannot, nor from thence come hither.

And he said:

Then, Father, I beseech thee that thou wouldst send him to my father’s house: For I have five brethren, that he may testify to them, lest they also come into this place of torments.

And Abraham said to him:

They have Moses and the prophets; let them hear them.

But he said:

No, father Abraham; but if one went to them from the dead, they will do penance.

And he said to him:

If they hear not Moses and the prophets, neither will they believe if one rise again from the dead.

Haydock Commentary Amos 6:1a,4-7

  • Ver. 1. Wealthy. Sept. Syr. and Arab. “despisers of Sion.” Heb. also, “who hate Sion.” The prophecy wholly regards Israel. C.—It is a great crime for the rich to neglect the poor; but still more so, when wealthy clergymen shew no compassion for the spiritual or corporal wants of their neighbours. W.—State. Heb. “to whom the house of Israel comes” for judgment.
  • Ver. 4. Ivory, with which the beds for eating were adorned. v. 7. C.—Wanton. Heb. “stretch themselves out upon their,” &c. H.
  • Ver. 5. David. They think they excel him in music; but he consecrated his talent to a better purpose. C.—Sept. “they deemed them stable, and not fugitive things.” H.—They have placed their chief good in such pleasures. Theod. C.
  • Ver. 6. In bowls. Sept. “refined,” (H.) or cleared of the dregs.—Joseph, of their brethren, or they seem to have no share in the sufferings of mankind. Ps. lxxii. 5.
  • Ver. 7. Luxurious. Heb. “the feast of those who stretch themselves out, shall,” &c. Sept. “the neighing shall be removed from Ephraim.” His luste shall be punished. Jer. v. 8.—Some translate Heb. “the mourning of those who stretch themselves on their beds is at hand.” Others, “their funeral feast is distant.” None shall bewail their death. So ambiguous is the original. C.

Haydock Commentary 1 Timothy 6:11-16

  • Ver. 11. But thou, O man of God. This, says S. Chrys. is one of the highest titles and commendations that can be given to any man. So are called Samuel, Elias, Eliseus. 1 K. ii. and ix. 3 K. xxxiii. Wi.
  • Ver. 12. Fight the good fight. Lit. strive a good strife. S. Paul oftentimes brings this comparison of men striving for a prize.—And hast confessed a good confession before many witnesses, not only when baptized, not only when thou wast ordained a bishop, but by thy constancy and sufferings, and persecutions, says S. Chrys. though we know not the particulars. Wi.—Timothy had made profession of his faith at his baptism, at his ordination, and during the whole course of a life which, through many labours and persecutions, had been dedicated entirely to promote the faith. D. Thomas.—Like him let us also combat, if we aspire after the same triumph and prize.
  • Ver. 13. Under Pontius Pilate, &c. Some expound it of the words and particular testimony Christ gave when he said he was king, but not of this world, who came to teach the truth. We may rather understand it with others, of all Christ taught and suffered under Pilate, or whilst he was governor of Judea. Wi.
  • Ver. 14. That thou keep the commandment. Some understand that of fighting manfully; others of loving God; others rather comprehend all that S. Paul had commanded him, and all the instructions given.—Unto the coming of our Lord; which coming, he in due time will shew. This is the construction by the Greek. Wi.00This coming will be desirable for Christians who have preserved or recovered their baptismal innocence, and for pastors who have faithfully fulfilled their ministry; but terrible, in the extreme, for all who have lived in the constant neglect and omission of their duties.
  • Ver. 16. Who only hath immortality; i.e. is immortal of himself, and by his own nature.—Light inaccessible;

to human eyes or understandings. Wi.

Haydock Commentary Luke 16:19-31

  • Ver. 19. There was a certain rich man, &c. By this history of the rich man and Lazarus, he declares that those who are placed in affluent circumstances, draw upon themselves a sentence of condemnation, if seeing their neighbor in want, they neglect to succour him. S. Cyril, in Cat. Graec. Partum.—He that hath the substance of this world, and shall see his brother in need, and shut up his bowels against him, how doth the charity of God abide in him? John, 1 Ep. iii. 17. A received tradition of the Jews informs us, that this Lazarus was a beggar, then at Jerusalem, suffering in the most wretched condition of poverty, and infirmity: him our Saviour introduces, to manifest more plainly the truth of what he had been saying. S. Cyril, ut supra.—By this, we are not to understand that all poverty is holy, and the possession of riches criminal; but, as luxury is the disgrace of riches, so holiness of life is the ornament of poverty. S. Ambrose.—A man may be reserved and modest in the midst of riches and honours, as he may e proud and avaricious in the obscurity of a poor and wretched life.—Divers interpreters have looked upon this as a true history; but what is said of the rich man seeing Lazarus, of his tongue, or his finger, cannot be literal: souls having no such parts. Wi.—In this parable, which S. Ambrose takes to be a real fact, we have the name of the poor mendicant; but our Lord suppresses the name of the rich man, to signify that his name is blotted out of the book of life: besides, the rich man tells Abraham, that he has five brothers, who were probably still living; wherefore, to save their honour, our Lord named not their reprobated brother.
  • Ver. 22. Abraham’s bosom. The place of rest, where the souls of the saints resided, till Christ had opened heaven by his death. Ch.—It was an ancient tradition of the Jews, that the souls of the just were conducted by angels into paradise. The bosom of Abraham (the common Father of all the faithful) was the place where the souls of the saints, and departed patriarchs, waited the arrival of their Deliverer. It was thither that Jesus went after his death; as it is said in the Creed, “he descended into hell,” to deliver those who were detained there, and who might at Christs’s ascension enter into heaven. Calmet. See 1 Pet. iii. 19.—“Many shall come from the east and the west, and shall sit down with Abraham.” Matt. viii. 11.
  • Ver. 25. It appears from Philo, (de Execrat. p. 9, 37 b.) that the Jews not only acknowledged the existence of souls, and their state of happiness or misery after this life, but also that the souls of the saints and patriarchs interceded with God for their descendants, and obtained for them the succour they stood in need of. Calmet.
  • Ver. 26. Between us and you is fixed a great chaos, or gulf; i.e. God’s justice has decreed, that the bad should forever be separated from the good. We may here take notice that the Latin and Greek word, (v. 22) translated hell, even in the Prot. translation, cannot signify only the grave. Wi.
  • Ver. 27. If they hear not Moses, &c. We think that if we saw a man raised from the dead, who should tell us what he had seen and suffered in another world, it would make more impression upon us than past miracles, which we hear of, or the promises and threats of the prophets, apostles, and our blessed Saviour, which are contained in the Scripture; but it is a false notion, a vain excuse. The wicked, and unbelievers, would even in that case find pretexts and objections for not believing. S. Chrys. hom. iv.—They would say that the dead man was a phantom; that his resurrection was not real; his assertion nugatory. When Christ raised Lazarus from the dead, the miracle was known, evident and public, yet we find none of the Pharisees converted by it. They were even so mad as to enter into a design to kill Lazarus, to get rid of a witness who deposed against their incredulity. How many other miracles did he not perform in their sight, which they attributed to the prince of darkness, or to magic? Christ raised himself from the dead. This fact was attested by many unexceptionable witnesses. And what do the hardened Jews do? They object, that his disciples, stealing away the body, maliciously persuaded the people that he had risen again. Such is the corruption of the human heart, that when once delivered up to any passion, nothing can movie it. Every day we see or hear of malefactors publicly executed yet their example has no effect on the survivors, nor does it prevent the commissions of fresh crimes. Calmet.—“We have also the more firm prophetical word; whereunto you do well to attend, as to a light that shineth in a dark place, until the day dawn, and the day-star arise in your hearts.” 2 Pet. i. 19.—We may learn many very instructive lessons from this affecting history of Lazarus.—The rich may learn the dreadful consequences to be apprehended from riches, when made subservient to sensuality, luxury, and ambition. The poor may learn to make their poverty and sufferings however grievous the nature, instrumental to their future happiness, by bearing them with patience and resignation and resignation to the will of heaven. The former are taught that to expose a man to eternal misery, nothing more is required than to enjoy all the good things of this world according to their own will; the latter that however they may be despised and rejected of men, they may still have courage, knowing that the short day of this fleeting life, with all its apparent evils will soon be over; and that the day of eternity is fast approaching, when everyone shall receive according as he has done good or evil in his body.

Daily Scripture Readings Monday September 20 2010 Memorial of Saint Andrew Kim Taegŏn, priest and martyr, and Saint Paul Chŏng Hasang, martyr, and their companions, martyrs

September 20 2010 Monday
Memorial of Saint Andrew Kim Taegŏn, priest and martyr, and
Saint Paul Chŏng Hasang, martyr, and their companions, martyrs

Disclaimer – Official Readings of the Liturgy at – http://www.usccb.org/nab/

Proverbs 3:27-34
Douay-Rheims Challoner

Do not withhold him from doing good, who is able: if thou art able, do good thyself also.
Say not to thy friend: Go, and come again: and to morrow I will give to thee: when thou canst give at present.
Practise not evil against thy friend, when he hath confidence in thee.
Strive not against a man without cause, when he hath done thee no evil.
Envy not the unjust man, and do not follow his ways.
For every mocker is an abomination to the Lord, and his communication is with the simple.
Want is from the Lord in the house of the wicked: but the habitations of the just shall be blessed.
He shall scorn the scorners, and to the meek he will give grace.

Responsorial Psalm 14:2-5 (Ps 15 NAB)
DR Challoner Text Only

He that walketh without blemish,
and worketh justice:
He that speaketh truth in his heart,
who hath not used deceit in his tongue:
Nor hath done evil to his neighbour:
nor taken up a reproach against his neighbours.
In his sight the malignant is brought to nothing:
but he glorifieth them that fear the Lord.
He that sweareth to his neighbour, and deceiveth not;
He that hath not put out his money to usury,
nor taken bribes against the innocent:
He that doth these things, shall not be moved for ever.

The Holy Gospel of Jesus Christ According to Saint Luke 8:16-18
Haydock New Testament

Jesus said:

Now no man that lighteth a candle, covereth it with a vessel, or putteth it under a bed: but setteth it upon a candlestick, that they who come in, may see the light. For there is not any thing secret, that shall not be made manifest: nor hidden, that shall not be known, and come abroad. Take heed, therefore, how you hear. For whosoever hath, to him shall be given: and whosoever hath not, that also which he thinketh he hath, shall be taken away from him.

Haydock Commentary Proverbs 3:27-34
Notes Copied From Haydock Commentary Site

  • Ver. 27. Able. Prot. “withhold not good from them to whom it is due, when it is in the power of thine hand to do it.”  Relieve the distressed.  H. — They have a title to that wealth, since those who possess it are bound to relieve the indigent.  C. — Sept. “refrain not from doing good,” &c.  H.
  • Ver. 28. Present. Alms in season are doubly valuable.  W. — Antigonus acquired the title of Dwswn, “about to give,” as he never gave, (Plutarch) but only promised.
  • Ver. 30. Cause. We may defend ourselves; but herein great discretion is necessary.  C. — Cum pari contendere anceps est: cum superiore furiosum; cum inferiore sordidum. Senec. Prov.
  • Ver. 31. Ways. Of injustice.  Seek not to attain his prosperity by the same means.  C.
  • Ver. 33. Want. Heb. “a curse.” — Shall be. Heb. “he blesseth.”  H.
  • Ver. 34. Scorners. Lit. “he will delude the scorners.”  H. — He will treat them as they would treat others.  Ps. xvii. 27.  C. — Sept. “the Lord resisteth the proud,” &c.  So the apostles quote this passage.  1 Pet. v. 5.  Jam. iv. 6.  H.

Haydock Commentary Luke 8:16-18

  • Ver. 16. Our Lord calls himself the lighted candle, placed in the middle of the world.  Christ was by nature God, and by dispensation man: and thus, not unlike a torch placed in the middle of a house, does our Lord, seated in the soul of man, illumine all around him.  But by the candlestick, is understood the Church, which he illuminates by the refulgent rays of his divine word.  S. Maximus. By these expressions, Jesus induces his audience to be very diligent, and quite alive in the momentous affair of salvation; informing them that they are placed in the public view of the whole world.  S. Chry. hom. xv. in Matt.
  • Ver. 18. He here exhorts his audience to attend to what he was about to deliver, and to apply themselves with all their attention to the divine word; for he who has a desire of hearing the word, shall also receive the grace and power of understanding it.  But the man who has no desire of hearing it, though from his learning he might expect to understand it, shall not understand it, because he does not willingly attend to the divine admonitions; hence it is said, Whosoever hath, to him also shall be given. Ven. Bede.