Daily Scripture Readings Monday Dec 13 2010 Memorial of St Lucy Virgin and Martyr

December 13 2010 Monday Memorial of Saint Lucy, virgin and martyr

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Numbers 24:2-7, 15-17a
Douay-Rheims Challoner

And lifting up his eyes, he saw Israel abiding in their tents by their tribes: and the spirit of God rushing upon him, He took up his parable and said: Balaam the son of Beor hath said: The man hath said, whose eye is stopped up: The bearer of the words of God hath said, he that hath beheld the vision of the Almighty, he that falleth, and so his eyes are opened: How beautiful are thy tabernacles O Jacob, and thy tents, O Israel! As woody valleys, as watered gardens near the rivers, as tabernacles which the Lord hath pitched, as cedars by the waterside. Water shall flow out of his bucket, and his seed shall be in many waters. For Agag his king shall be removed, and his kingdom shall be taken away.

Therefore taking up his parable, again he said: Balaam the son of Beor hath said: The man whose eye is stopped up, hath said: The hearer of the words of God hath said, who knoweth the doctrine of the Highest, and seeth the visions of the Almighty, who falling hath his eyes opened: I shall see him, but not now: I shall behold him, but not near. A STAR SHALL RISE out of Jacob and a sceptre shall spring up from Israel

Responsorial Psalm 24:4-9 (Ps 25 NAB)
DR Challoner Text Only

Let all them be confounded that act unjust things without cause.
Shew, O Lord, thy ways to me, and teach me thy paths.
Direct me in thy truth, and teach me;
for thou art God my Saviour;
and on thee have I waited all the day long.
Remember, O Lord, thy bowels of compassion;
and thy mercies that are from the beginning of the world.
The sins of my youth and my ignorances do not remember.
According to thy mercy remember thou me:
for thy goodness’ sake, O Lord.
The Lord is sweet and righteous:
therefore he will give a law to sinners in the way.
He will guide the mild in judgment:
he will teach the meek his ways.

The Holy Gospel of Jesus Christ According to Saint Matthew 21:23-27
Haydock New Testament

And when he was come into the temple, the chief priests and ancients of the people came to him as he was teaching, saying:

By what authority dost thou these things? And who gave thee this authority?

Jesus answering, said to them:

I also will ask you one word, which if you shall tell me, I will tell also tell you by what authority I do these things. The baptism of John, whence was it? From heaven or from men?

But they thought within themselves, saying:

If we shall say, From heaven, he will say to us: Why then did you not believe him? But if we shall say, From men, we are afraid of the multitude: for all held John as a prophet.

And answering Jesus, they said:

We know not.

And he said to them:

Neither do I tell you by what authority I do these things.

Haydock Commentary Numbers 24:2-7, 15-17a
Notes Copied From Haydock Commentary Site

  • Ver. 3. Up. The same term only occurs again, (Lament. iii. 8,) where it may have the same sense, though the Sept. &c. give it here a quite opposite meaning, “the man whose eyes are open,” the prophet.  But Balaam alludes to his not being able to see the angel as soon as his ass, as he does, v. 4.  C. xxii. 31.  C.
  • Ver. 4. Falleth. Out of respect to God, or in a trance.  Sept. “in sleep, his eyes are uncovered.”  He was accustomed to commune with the spirits in the night.  C. xxii. 8.  H. — He who is clear-sighted enough in teaching others, neglecteth his own salvation; or, being  naturally incapable of diving into futurity, he derives this power solely from the operation of the spirit.  M.
  • Ver. 6. Woody. Heb. also “extensive torrents.” — Tabernacles. Heb. ahalim, which some render lign-aloes, or stacte, as S. Jerom does, Ps. xliv. 9.  Prov. vii. 17.  Cant. iv. 14.  The aloe-tree, however, was brought from India, and was not common in Arabia.  The Syrian aloe was only a shrub; and this tree, of which Balaam speaks, must have been tall and beautiful. — Pitched. Heb. “planted.”  C. — The Sept. agree however with the Vulg.  H. — Side. Cedars grow very large on the top of Libanus, and are always green; the fruit resembles the pine-apple; the wood is incorruptible.  Sionita 6.  By humility we must rise to the summit of perfection.  D.
  • Ver. 7. Waters. Sept. Chal. and Syr. “From his seed a man shall spring, who shall have dominion over many nations.”  This must be understood of the Messias; or, his posterity shall be very numerous; (see Prov. v. 15. 16,) or his country shall be well watered, and his crops luxuriant. — Agag. Saul lost his crown for sparing the king of the Amalecites, who always took this title, 1 K. xv. 9.  Heb. may be translated, “Above Agag shall his (Israel’s) king be exalted, yet,” &c. or “and his kingdom shall increase.”  Philo and S. Ambrose read, “his kingdom shall be raised on high.”  The Sam. and some copies of the Sept. have, “Over Gog;” while others have Og, (C.) which may be referred to the king of Basan, who, though lately overthrown, had been possessed of great power and wealth.  Israel was not satisfied with the extent of his dominions.  H. — Those who read Gog, suppose that the victories of Christ over Antichrist are foretold.  Origen, hom. 17.  S. Cyp. Test. i. 10.  C.
  • Ver. 16. Who knoweth. This is a new title, which he had not before assumed, v. 4.
  • Ver. 17. Him. The great personage whom I have in view, whose coming is deferred yet for many ages.  H. — The whole prediction refers to the Messias, whom Balaam beheld by the eyes of his posterity, the wise men, (C.) or in the prophetic vision.  M. — Some modern Rabbins pretend that he speaks of David, who was indeed a figure of Christ, (C.) and defeated the Moabites, 2 K. v. 8.  But the prophecy was perfectly fulfilled only in our Saviour’s person, who is called the bright and morning star, (Apoc. xxii. 16,) to whom all nations were given for an inheritance.  Ps. ii.  Acts i. 8.  W. — Heb. also, “I see this thy ruin, but,” &c.  Sept. “I will shew to him, yet not now; I will make him happy, (C.); but (makarizo, I bless) it, or he does not approach.”  God executed what he ever promised in favour of all Israel, when he sent them his beloved Son. — A star. Christ, the light of the world, the splendour of his Father’s glory, whose birth was made known in the East, by a star, or meteor of unusual brightness.  H. — This material star is not the primary object of the prediction, since it did not rise out of Jacob, but it pointed out the orient from on high, and then disappeared.  The ancient Jews understood this passage of the Messias.  Onkelos, &c.  Hence the impostor, Ben. Cusiba, took advantage of this general opinion, to draw the people after him, as the person designated; when he assumed the title of Bar-chocheba, “the son of the star,” in the second age of the church. — Of Seth. Though David, as the figure of the Messias, conquered the Moabites, he cannot be said to have subdued all nations, the descendants of Seth, by Noe, nor all the just of whom Seth was the father, in opposition to the children of Cain.  But Christ will subject all the just to his empire, and will judge all mankind. Some, nevertheless, take the children of Seth to be the Moabites, who had been already mentioned; and Junius translates the Heb. with allusion to the shameful origin of that people.  The Samar. may also signify, if we substitute d for r in korkor, as Jeremias also reads (C. xlviii. 45,) kodod. “He shall penetrate the ends of Moab, and shall overturn the walls of the children of elevation, or of pride.”  There were many hills in the country of the Moabites, and the people were noted for haughtiness.  Jer. xlviii. 28. 29. 45.  C. — Some also assert, that Seth was the name of a king, (Grot.) and of a town of Moab.  R. Nathan. — But of this there is no proof.  H.

Haydock Commentary Matthew 21:23-27

  • Ver. 24-25. The baptism of John, by which is also understood his doctrine and preaching, was it from heaven or not? Wi.
  • Ver. 26. He will say to us: Why then did not you believe him? When he divers times bore witness to you that I am your Messias.  Wi.

Catena Aurea Matthew 21:23-27
from http://www.catecheticsonline.com/

  • Pseudo-Chrys.: The Priests were tormented with jealousy, because they had seen Christ entering the Temple in great glory. And not being able to master the fire of jealousy which burnt in their breasts, they break forth in speech.
  • Chrys.: Forasmuch as they could not detract from His miracles, they bring matter of blame from His forbidding to sell in the Temple. As though they had said, Hast Thou assumed the seat of authority? Hast Thou been anointed Priest, that Thou exertest this power?
  • Pseudo-Chrys.: By that they add, “Or who gave thee this authority?” they shew that there be many persons who give power to men, whether corporal or spiritual! as though they had said, Thou art not come of a priestly family; the Senate has not conferred on Thee this power, neither has Caesar granted it. But had they believed that all power is from God, they would never have asked, “Who gave thee this authority?” For every man judges of others by himself. The fornicator thinks that none are chaste; the chaste does not readily suspect any of fornication; he who is not a Priest of God, thinks no man’s Priesthood to be of God.
  • Jerome: Or in these words they urge the same cavil as above, when they said, “He casteth out demons through Beelzebub the Prince of the demons.” [Mat_12:24] For when they say, “By what authority doest thou thee things?” they doubt concerning the power of God, and would have it understood that the things He does are of the Devil. But when they add, “Who gave thee this authority?” they most clearly deny the Son of God, whom they suppose to work miracles, not by His own, but by others’ strength. The Lord could have confuted the calumny of His tempters by a simple answer, but He put a question to them of such skilful contrivance, that they must be condemned either by their silence or their knowledge; “Jesus answered and said unto them, I also will ask you one question.”
  • Pseudo-Chrys.: Not that they should answer it, and thereupon hear of Christ the answer to their question, but that being puzzled they should ask Him no farther; according to that precept He had given above, “Give not that which is holy to the dogs.” [Mat_7:6] For even if He had told them, it would have profited nothing, because the darkened will cannot perceive the things that are of the light. For him that enquires we ought to instruct, but him that tempts, to overthrow by a stroke of reasoning, but not to publish to him the power of the mystery. The Lord thus sets before them in His question a dilemma; and that they might not escape Him, says, “Which if ye tell me, I in like wise will tell you by what authority I do these things.” His question is this; “The baptism of John whence was it? from heaven, or of men?”
  • Aug., in Joan. Tr., v. 4: John received his authority to baptize from Him, whom he afterwards baptized; and that baptism which was committed to him is here called the baptism of John. He alone received such a gift; no righteous man before or after him was entrusted with a baptism to be called from himself. For John came to baptize in the water of repentance, to prepare the way for the Lord, not to give inward cleansing, which mere man cannot do.
  • Jerome: What the Priests revolved in their malice is shewn when he adds, “But they reasoned with themselves.” For had they replied that it was from heaven, the question was inevitable, Why then were ye not baptized by John? But should they reply that it was an invention of human device, and had in it nothing divine, they feared a tumult among the people. For all the assembled multitudes had received John’s baptism, and held him accordingly for a Prophet. This godless party therefore make answer, and by a seeming humility of speech confessing that they know not, turned to hide their insidious designs. And they answered Jesus, and said, “We know not.” In saying that they knew not, they lied; and it might have followed upon their answering thus, that the Lord also should say, I know not; but truth cannot lie, and therefore it follows, “And he said unto them, Neither tell I you by what authority I do these things.” This shews that they knew, but would not answer, and that He also knew, but would not answer, because they would not speak what they knew.
  • Origen: But some one will say in opposition to this, that it was absurd to ask by what authority Jesus did these things. For that it could not be that He would answer, that He did these by the Devil’s authority; and He would not tell them as it truly was, that He did them by His own power. If it should be said, that the rulers put this question to Him in order to deter Him from His proceedings; as when we say to one who is dealing with what is ours in a way which we do not like, we say to him, Who bade thee do this? meaning to deter him from what he is so doing; — if it is to be taken so, what means Christ’s answer, Do you tell Me this, and I will tell you by what authority I do these things. Perhaps therefore, the place should be understood as follows. There are in the general two opposite powers, one on the side of God, the other on the side of the Devil; but of particular powers there are many; for it was not one and the same power that wrought in all the Prophets to enable them to do miracles, but one in these, another in those; and, it may be, for lesser things a lesser power, for greater things a greater power. The Chief Priests had seen Jesus working many miracles, whereupon they desired to know the special degree and properties of that power which wrought in Him. For others who have wrought miracles wrought them at first in one power, and afterwards when more advanced in another and greater power; but the Saviour wrought all in one power, that which He received of the Father. But because they were not worthy to hear such mysteries, therefore He gives them no answer, but on the contrary put a question to them.
  • Raban.: There are two reasons why the knowledge of truth should be kept back from those who ask; either when he who asks is unfit to receive, or from his hatred or contempt of the truth is unworthy to have that which he asks opened to him.
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Daily Scripture Readings Friday September 24 2010 25th Week in Ordinary Time

September 24 2010 Friday Twenty Fifth Week in Ordinary Time
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Ecclesiastes 3:1-11
Douay-Rheims Challoner

All things have their season, and in their times all things pass under heaven.
A time to be born and a time to die. A time to plant, and a time to pluck up that which is planted.
A time to kill, and a time to heal. A time to destroy, and a time to build.
A time to weep, and a time to laugh. A time to mourn, and a time to dance.
A time to scatter stones, and a time to gather. A time to embrace, and a time to be far from embraces.
A time to get, and a time to lose. A time to keep, and a time to cast away.
A time to rend, and a time to sew. A time to keep silence, and a time to speak.
A time of love, and a time of hatred. A time of war, and a time of peace.
What hath man more of his labour?
I have seen the trouble, which God hath given the sons of men to be exercised in it.
He hath made all things good in their time, and hath delivered the world to their consideration, so that man cannot find out the work which God hath made from the beginning to the end.

Responsorial Psalm 143:1b and 2abc, 3-4
DR Challoner

Blessed be the Lord my God.
My mercy, and my refuge:
my support, and my deliverer:
My protector, and I have hoped in him.
Lord, what is man,
that thou art made known to him?
or the son of man,
that thou makest account of him?
Man is like to vanity:
his days pass away like a shadow.

The Holy Gospel of Jesus Christ According to Saint Luke 9:18-22
Haydock New Testament

And it came to pass, as he was alone praying, his disciples also were with him: and he asked them, saying;

Whom do the people say that I am?

But they answered, and said:

John the Baptist: but some say Elias; and others say, that one of the former prophets is risen again.

And he said to them:

But whom do you say that I am?

Simon Peter answering, said:

The Christ of God.

But he strictly charging them, commanded they should tell this to no man, Saying:

The Son of man must suffer many things, and be rejected by the ancients, and chief priests, and Scribes, and be killed, and rise again the third day.

Haydock Commentary Ecclesiastes 3:1-11
Notes Copied From Haydock Commentary Site

  • Ver. 1. Heaven, in this world, where alone things change.  S. Jer. — Nothing is here perpetual, but to be used in a proper manner.  W. — The heart must not be attached to any thing created.  C. — Pleasure had been condemned and approved.  C. 2.  He shews that all must have its time. M.
  • Ver. 5. Stones, with a sling, or to render a field useless.  4 K. iii. 25.  Is. v. 2. — Embraces. Countenance was sometimes prescribed for married people.  Lev. xx. 18. and 1 Cor. vii.  S. Jer.   S. Aug. Ench. 78.  C. — Hatred often succeeds love.  v. 8. and 2 K. xiii. 14.  H.
  • Ver. 9. Labour? What advantage does he derive from any of these things?  C. i. 3.  C.
  • Ver. 11. Consideration. Lit. “dispute.”  Heb. and Sept. “heart.”  H. — Pagn. “He has implanted the desire of immortality in their hearts.” — End. If we could discover the properties of each thing, we should be in raptures; (C.) but as we cannot, this increases our vexation.  M.

Haydock Commentary Luke 9:18-22

  • Ver. 18. As he was alone praying: i.e. remote from the people, though his disciples are said to have been with him. Wi.

Daily Scripture Readings Monday September 20 2010 Memorial of Saint Andrew Kim Taegŏn, priest and martyr, and Saint Paul Chŏng Hasang, martyr, and their companions, martyrs

September 20 2010 Monday
Memorial of Saint Andrew Kim Taegŏn, priest and martyr, and
Saint Paul Chŏng Hasang, martyr, and their companions, martyrs

Disclaimer – Official Readings of the Liturgy at – http://www.usccb.org/nab/

Proverbs 3:27-34
Douay-Rheims Challoner

Do not withhold him from doing good, who is able: if thou art able, do good thyself also.
Say not to thy friend: Go, and come again: and to morrow I will give to thee: when thou canst give at present.
Practise not evil against thy friend, when he hath confidence in thee.
Strive not against a man without cause, when he hath done thee no evil.
Envy not the unjust man, and do not follow his ways.
For every mocker is an abomination to the Lord, and his communication is with the simple.
Want is from the Lord in the house of the wicked: but the habitations of the just shall be blessed.
He shall scorn the scorners, and to the meek he will give grace.

Responsorial Psalm 14:2-5 (Ps 15 NAB)
DR Challoner Text Only

He that walketh without blemish,
and worketh justice:
He that speaketh truth in his heart,
who hath not used deceit in his tongue:
Nor hath done evil to his neighbour:
nor taken up a reproach against his neighbours.
In his sight the malignant is brought to nothing:
but he glorifieth them that fear the Lord.
He that sweareth to his neighbour, and deceiveth not;
He that hath not put out his money to usury,
nor taken bribes against the innocent:
He that doth these things, shall not be moved for ever.

The Holy Gospel of Jesus Christ According to Saint Luke 8:16-18
Haydock New Testament

Jesus said:

Now no man that lighteth a candle, covereth it with a vessel, or putteth it under a bed: but setteth it upon a candlestick, that they who come in, may see the light. For there is not any thing secret, that shall not be made manifest: nor hidden, that shall not be known, and come abroad. Take heed, therefore, how you hear. For whosoever hath, to him shall be given: and whosoever hath not, that also which he thinketh he hath, shall be taken away from him.

Haydock Commentary Proverbs 3:27-34
Notes Copied From Haydock Commentary Site

  • Ver. 27. Able. Prot. “withhold not good from them to whom it is due, when it is in the power of thine hand to do it.”  Relieve the distressed.  H. — They have a title to that wealth, since those who possess it are bound to relieve the indigent.  C. — Sept. “refrain not from doing good,” &c.  H.
  • Ver. 28. Present. Alms in season are doubly valuable.  W. — Antigonus acquired the title of Dwswn, “about to give,” as he never gave, (Plutarch) but only promised.
  • Ver. 30. Cause. We may defend ourselves; but herein great discretion is necessary.  C. — Cum pari contendere anceps est: cum superiore furiosum; cum inferiore sordidum. Senec. Prov.
  • Ver. 31. Ways. Of injustice.  Seek not to attain his prosperity by the same means.  C.
  • Ver. 33. Want. Heb. “a curse.” — Shall be. Heb. “he blesseth.”  H.
  • Ver. 34. Scorners. Lit. “he will delude the scorners.”  H. — He will treat them as they would treat others.  Ps. xvii. 27.  C. — Sept. “the Lord resisteth the proud,” &c.  So the apostles quote this passage.  1 Pet. v. 5.  Jam. iv. 6.  H.

Haydock Commentary Luke 8:16-18

  • Ver. 16. Our Lord calls himself the lighted candle, placed in the middle of the world.  Christ was by nature God, and by dispensation man: and thus, not unlike a torch placed in the middle of a house, does our Lord, seated in the soul of man, illumine all around him.  But by the candlestick, is understood the Church, which he illuminates by the refulgent rays of his divine word.  S. Maximus. By these expressions, Jesus induces his audience to be very diligent, and quite alive in the momentous affair of salvation; informing them that they are placed in the public view of the whole world.  S. Chry. hom. xv. in Matt.
  • Ver. 18. He here exhorts his audience to attend to what he was about to deliver, and to apply themselves with all their attention to the divine word; for he who has a desire of hearing the word, shall also receive the grace and power of understanding it.  But the man who has no desire of hearing it, though from his learning he might expect to understand it, shall not understand it, because he does not willingly attend to the divine admonitions; hence it is said, Whosoever hath, to him also shall be given. Ven. Bede.

Daily Scripture Readings Saturday September 11 2010 23rd Week in Ordinary Time

September 11 2010 Saturday Twenty Third Week in Ordinary Time
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1 Corinthians 10:14-22
Haydock New Testament

Wherefore, my dearly beloved, flee from the service of idols. I speak as to wise men: judge ye yourselves what I say. The chalice of benediction which we bless, is it not the communion of the blood of Christ? And the bread which we break, is it not the partaking of the body of the Lord? For we being many, are one bread, one body, all who partake of one bread. Behold Israel, according to the flesh; are not they, who eat of the sacrifices, partakers of the altar?

What then? Do I say, that what is offered in sacrifice to idols, is any thing? Or that the idol is any thing? But the things which the heathens sacrifice, they sacrifice to devils, and not to God. And I would not that you should be made partakers with devils: you cannot drink the chalice of the Lord, and the chalice of devils: You cannot be partakers of the table of the Lord, and of the table of devils. Do  we provoke the Lord to jealousy? Are we stronger than he? All things are lawful for me, but all things are not expedient.

Responsorial Psalm 115:3-4, 8-9
(Ps 116:12-13, 17-18 NAB)
DR Challoner Text Only

What shall I render to the Lord,
for all the things that he hath rendered to me?
I will take the chalice of salvation;
and I will call upon the name of the Lord.
I will sacrifice to thee the sacrifice of praise,
and I will call upon the name of the Lord.
I will pay my vows to the Lord
in the sight of all his people:

The Holy Gospel of Jesus Christ According to Saint Luke 6:43-49
Haydock New Testament

Jesus said:

For there is no good tree that bringeth forth evil fruit: nor an evil tree that bringeth forth good fruit. For every tree is known by its fruit. For men do not gather figs from thorns: nor from a bramble bush do they gather grapes. A good man, out of the good treasure of his heart, bringeth forth that which is good: and an evil man, out of the evil treasure, bringeth forth that which is evil. For out of the abundance of the heart the mouth speaketh.

And why call you me Lord, Lord: and do not the things which I say? Every one that cometh to me, and heareth my words, and doth them: I will she you to whom he is like. He is like to a man building a house, who digged deep, and laid the foundation upon a rock. And when a flood came, the stream beat vehemently upon that house, and it could not shake it: for it was founded on a rock. But he that heareth, and doth not: is like to a man building his house upon the earth without a foundation: against which the stream beat vehemently, and immediately it fell: and the ruin of that house was great.

Haydock Commentary 1 Corinthians 10:14-22
Notes Copied From Haydock Commentary Site

  • Ver. 14. There are various kinds of idolatry.  It is the perfection of Angels never to err: it is a human imperfection to fall into error, but a diabolical crime, so to love our error, as to divide the Church by schism, or leave it by heresy: this love of self is the most dangerous idolatry.
  • Ver. 16. The chalice of benediction,[2] &c.  Which the priests bless or consecrate, is it not the communion of the blood of Christ?  And the bread which we break, (so called because of the outward appearance of bread) is it not the partaking or communion of the body of the Lord? See S. Chrys. here, hom. xxiv. p. 396. and p. 400.  See also the Annotations, Matt. xxvi. 26.  Wi. Here the apostle puts them in mind of the partaking of the body and blood of Christ in the sacred mysteries, and becoming thereby one mystical body with Christ.  From whence he infers, (v. 21.) that they who are made partakers with Christ, by the eucharistic sacrifice, and sacrament, must not be made partakers with devils, by eating of the meats sacrificed to them.  Ch.
  • Ver. 17. We being many, are one bread. Or, as it  may be rendered, agreeably both to the Latin and Greek, because the bread is one, all we, being many, are one body, who partake of that one bread. For it is by our communicating with Christ and with one another, in this blessed Sacrament, that we are formed into one mystical body; and made, as it were, one bread, compounded of many grains of corn, closely united together.  Ch. From the sacrament of the real body of Christ in the eucharist, he passeth to the effect of this sacrament, which is to unite all those who partake of it, as members of the same mystical body of Christ, which is his Church: and from hence he presently draws this consequence, that such as are members of that body, of which Christ is the head, cannot have any communication with idolaters, or with those that offer sacrifices to idols and devils.  Wi.
  • Ver. 18. Behold Israel, according to the flesh. That is, the people that were the offspring of Israel or Jacob.  Are not these they who offered sacrifices to the true God, and eat or the sacrifices, which were offered on his altars, and by offering to him such sacrifices, acknowledged him to be their God, and the only true God: and so you, if you partake, and eat of the sacrifices of idolaters, and of what they tell you was offered to their idols, you seem at least, to join with them in acknowledging, and paying reverence to their idols, which are devils: and you cannot be partakers of the table of the Lord, and of the table of devils. Co we provoke the Lord to jealousy? that is, how dare we provoke our Lord, who is a jealous God, and will admit of no rival, by partaking of sacrifices offered to false gods? how dare we thus contemn his power, as if we were stronger than he, or that he could not punish us? Wi.
  • Ver. 19. What then? do I say, &c.  He puts this objection, as if it were contradictory to what he had taught before, (c. viii. v. 4.) that an idol is nothing, &c. but he answers this objection by saying that all things, that is, all meats are lawful in themselves, but not always expedient, nor edifying, when they give scandal to weak brethren, or when the infidels themselves think that such as eat things offered to idols, join with them in honouring their idols.  Wi. The meaning of this passage is: whilst I advise you to abstain from eating of any thing consecrated to idols, I do not advise you as supposing that these offerings have any power in themselves to defile your souls, in the same manner as by eating of the body and blood of Christ we receive strength to overcome our spiritual enemies.  S. Paul here anticipates an objection that might be made by some to whom he was writing.  Est.
  • Ver. 21. In all this discourse, a comparison is instituted between the Christian host and oblation, its effects, conditions and properties, with the altars, hosts, sacrifices and immolations of the Jews and Gentiles; which the apostle could not have done, had there not been a proper sacrifice in the Christian worship.  The holy Fathers teach the same with the ancient Councils.  This in the council of Nice: The lamb of God laid upon the altar. Conc. Ephes.  The unbloody service of the sacrifice. In S. Cyril Alex. in Conc. Ephes. Anath. 11.  The quickening holy sacrifice; the unbloody host and victim. Tertul. de coron. milit. The propitiatory sacrifice both for the living and the dead. This Melchisedech did most singularly prefigure in his mystical oblation of bread and wine; this also according to the prophecy of Malachy, shall continue from the rising to the setting sun, a perpetual substitute for all the Jewish sacrifices; and this, in plain terms, is called the Mass, by S. Augustin, Serm. ccli. 91.  Conc. Cartha. ii. c. 3. 4. c. 84. Milevit. 12.  S. Leo, ep. 81. 88. c. 2.  S. Gregory, l. ii. ep. 9. 92. &c. &c.  See next chap. v. 24.

Haydock Commentary Luke 6:43-49

  • Ver. 48. That man buildeth safely who hath both faith and good works; whereas the man that trusteth to his faith alone, to his reading or knowledge of Scripture, and doth not work and live accordingly, buildeth on sand.  B.

Catena Aurea Luke 6:43-49
From Catechetics Online

  • THEOPHYL; Our Lord continues the words which He had begun against the hypocrites, saying, For a good tree brings not forth corrupt fruit; i.e. as if He says, If you would have a true and unfeigned righteousness, what you set forth in words make up also in works, for the hypocrite though he pretends to be good is not good, who does evil works; and the innocent though he be blamed, is not therefore evil, who does good works.
  • TITUS BOS. But take not these words to thyself as an encouragement to idleness, for the tree is moved conformably to its nature but you have the exercise of free will; and every barren tree has been ordained for some good, but you were created to the good work of virtue.
  • ISIDORE PELEUS; He does not then exclude repentance, but a continuance in evil, which as long as it is evil cannot bring forth good fruit, but being converted to virtue, will yield abundance. But what nature is to the tree, our affections are to us. If then a corrupt tree cannot bring forth good fruit, how shall a corrupt heart?
  • CHRYS. But although the fruit is caused by the tree, yet, it brings to us the knowledge of the tree, because the distinctive nature of the tree is made evident by the fruit, as it follows, For every tree is know by its fruit.
  • CYRIL; Each man’s life also will be a criterion of his character. For not by extrinsic ornaments and pretended humility is the beauty of true happiness discovered, but by those things which a man does; of which he gives an illustration, adding, For of thorns men do not gather figs.
  • AMBROSE; On the thorns of this world the fig cannot be found, which as being better in its second fruit, is well fitted to be a similitude of the resurrection. Either because, as you read, The fig trees have put forth their green figs, that is, the unripe and worthless fruit came first in the Synagogue. Or because our life is imperfect in the flesh, perfect in the resurrection, and therefore we ought to cast far from us worldly cares, which eat into the mind and scorch up the soul, that by diligent culture we may obtain the perfect fruits. This therefore has reference to the world and the resurrection, the next to the soul and the body, as it follows, Nor of a bramble bush gather they grapes. Either because no one living in sin obtains fruit to his soul, which like the grape nearest the ground is rotten, on the higher branches becomes ripe. Or because no one can escape the condemnations of the flesh, but he whom Christ has redeemed, Who as a grape hung on the tree.
  • THEOPHYL; Or, I think the thorns and bramble are the cares of the world and the prickings of sin, but the figs and the grapes are the sweetness of a new life and the warmth of love, but the fig is not gathered from the thorns nor the grape from the bramble, because the mind still debased by the habits of the old man may pretend to, but cannot bring forth the fruits of the new man. But we must know, that as the fruitful palm tree is enclosed and supported by a hedge, and the thorn bearing fruit not its own, preserves it for the use of man, so the words and acts of the wicked wherein they serve the good are not done by the wicked themselves, but by the wisdom of God working upon them.
  • CYRIL; But having shown that the good and the bad man may be discerned by their works as a tree by its fruits, he now sets forth the same thing by another figure, saying, A good man out of the good treasure of his heart brings forth that which is good, and the evil man out of the evil treasure brings forth that which is evil.
  • THEOPHYL; The treasure of the heart is the same as the root of the tree. He therefore who has in his heart the treasure of patience and perfect love, brings forth the best fruits, loving his enemy, and doing the other things which have been taught above. But he who keeps a bad treasure in his heart does the contrary to this.
  • BASIL; The quality of the words shows the heart from which they proceed, plainly manifesting the inclination of our thoughts. Hence it follows, For out of the abundance of the heart the mouth speaks.
  • CHRYS. For it is a natural consequence when wickedness abounds within, that wicked words are breathed as far as the mouth; and therefore when you hear of a man uttering abominable things, do not suppose that there lies only so much wickedness in him as is expressed in his words, but believe the fountain to be more copious than the stream.
  • THEOPHYL; By the speaking of the mouth the Lord signifies all things, which by word, or deed, or thought, we bring forth from the heart. For it is the manner of the Scripture to put words for deeds.
  • THEOPHYL; Lest any one should vainly flatter himself with the words, Out of the abundance of the heart the mouth speaks, as if words only and not rather works were required of a Christian, our Lord adds the following, But why call you me Lord, Lord, and do not the things which I say? As if He said, Why do you boast of sending forth the leaves of a right confession, and show forth no fruit of good works.
  • CYRIL; But Lordship both in name and reality belongs only to the Highest Nature.
  • ATHAN. This is not then the word of man, but the Word of God, manifesting His own birth from the Father, for He is the Lord Who is born of the Lord alone. But fear not the duality of Persons, for they are not separate in nature.
  • CYRIL; But the advantage which arises from the keeping of the commandments, or the loss from disobedience, he shows as follows; Whosoever comes to me, and hears my sayings, he is like to a man who built his house upon a rock, &c.
  • THEOPHYL; The rock is Christ. He digs deep; by the precepts of humility He plucks out all earthly things from the hearts of the faithful, lest they should serve God from regard to their temporal good.
  • BASIL; But lay your foundations upon , a rock, that is, lean upon the faith of Christ, so as to persevere immovable in adversity, whether it come from man or God.
  • THEOPHYL; Or the foundation of the house is the resolution to live a good life, which the perfect hearer firmly lays in fulfilling the commandments of God.
  • AMBROSE; Or, He teaches that the obedience to heavenly precepts is the foundation of all virtue, by means of which this our house can be moved neither by the torrent of pleasures, nor by the violence of spiritual wickedness, neither by the storms of this world, nor by the cloudy disputations of heretics; hence it follows, But the flood came, &c.
  • THEOPHYL; A flood comes in three ways, either by unclean spirits, or wicked men, or the very restlessness of mind or body; and as far as men trust in their own strength they fall away, but as long as they cling to the immovable rock they cannot even be shaken.
  • CHRYS. The Lord also shows us that faith profits a man nothing, if his manner of life be corrupt. Hence it follows, But he that hears and does not, is like a man, that without a foundation built an house upon the earth, &c.
  • THEOPHYL; The house of the devil is the world which lies in wickedness, which he builds upon the earth, because those who obey him he drags down from heaven to earth; he builds without foundation, for sin has no foundation, standing not by its own nature, for evil is without substance, which yet whatever it is, grows up in the nature of good. But because the foundation is called so from fundus, we may not unfitly understand that fundamentum is placed here for fundus. As then he who is fallen into a well is kept at the bottom of the well, so the soul falling away remains stationary, as it were, at the very bottom, as long as it continues in any measure of sin. But not content with the sin into which it is fallen, while daily sinking into worse, it can find no bottom, as it were, in the well to which it may fix itself. But every kind of temptation increasing, both the really bad and the feignedly good become worse, until at last they come to everlasting punishment Hence it follows, Against which the stream did beat vehemently. By the force of the stream may be understood the trial of the last judgment, when both houses being finished, the wicked shall go into everlasting punishment but the righteous into life eternal.
  • CYRIL; Or they build upon the earth without foundation, who upon the quicksand of doubt, which relates to opinion, lay the foundation of their spiritual building, which a few drops of temptation wash away.
  • AUG. Now this long discourse of our Lord, Luke begins in the same way as Matthew; for each says, Blessed are the poor. Then many things which follow in the narration of each are like, and finally the conclusion of the discourse is found to be altogether the same, I mean with respect to the men who build upon the rock and the sand. It might then easily be supposed that Luke has inserted the same discourse of our Lord, and yet has left out some sentences which Matthew has kept, and likewise put in others which Matthew has not; were it not that Matthew says the discourse was spoken by our Lord on the mountain, but Luke on the plain by our Lord standing. It is not however thought likely from this that these two discourses are separated by a long course of time, because both before and after both have related some things like or the same. It may however have happened that our Lord was at first on a higher part of the mountain with His disciples alone, and that then he descended with them from the mount, that is, from the summit of the mountain to the flat place, that is, to some level ground, which was on the side of the mountain, and was able to hold large multitudes, and that there He stood until the crowds were gathered together to Him, and afterwards when He sat down His disciples came nearer, and to them, and the rest of the multitude who were present, He held the same discourse.

Daily Scripture Readings Friday Sept 10 2010 23rd Week in Ordinary Time

September 10 2010 Friday Twenty Third Week in Ordinary Time
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1 Corinthians 9:16-19, 22b-27
Haydock New Testament

For if I preach the gospel, it is no glory to me: for a necessity lieth upon me: for wo is unto me, if I preach not the gospel. For if I do this thing willingly, I have a reward: but if against my will, a dispensation is committed to me. What is my reward then? That preaching the gospel, I may deliver the gospel without charge, that I abuse not my power in the gospel. For whereas I was free as to all, I made myself the servant of all: that I might gain more.

I became all things to all men, that I might save all. And I do all things for the gospel’s sake: that I may be made partaker thereof. Know you not that they who run in the race, all run indeed, but one receiveth the prize? So run that you may obtain. And every one that striveth for the mastery refraineth himself from all things: and they indeed that they may receive a corruptible crown: but we an incorruptible one.

I, therefore, so run, not as at an uncertainty: I so fight, not as one beating the air: But I chastise my body, and bring it into subjection: lest, perhaps, when I have preached to others, I myself should become reprobate.

Responsorial Psalm 83:3-6, 12 (Ps 84 NAB)
DR Challoner Text Only

My soul longeth and fainteth for the courts of the Lord.
My heart and my flesh have rejoiced in the living God.
For the sparrow hath found herself a house,
and the turtle a nest for herself
where she may lay her young ones:
Thy altars, O Lord of hosts, my king and my God.
Blessed are they that dwell in thy house, O Lord:
they shall praise thee for ever and ever.
Blessed is the man whose help is from thee:
in his heart he hath disposed to ascend by steps,
For God loveth mercy and truth:
the Lord will give grace and glory.

The Holy Gospel of Jesus Christ According to Saint Luke 6:39-42
Haydock New Testament

And he spoke also to them a similitude:

Can the blind lead the blind? Do they not both fall into the ditch? The disciple is not above his master: but every one shall be perfect, if he be as his master. And why seest thou the mote in thy brother’s eye, but the beam that is in thy own eye, thou considerest not? Or how canst thou say to thy brother: Brother, let me pull the mote out of thy eye: when thou thyself seest not the beam in thy own eye? Thou hypocrite, cast first the beam out of thy own eye: and then shalt thou see clearly to take out the mote from thy brother’s eye.

Haydock Commentary 1 Corinthians 9:16-19, 22b-27
Notes Copied From Haydock Commentary Site

  • Ver. 16. It is no glory. That is, I have nothing to glory of.  Ch. If I preach the gospel through compulsion, fear, or mere necessity, having no other means of maintenance, I must not look for a reward in heaven; but now doing it through charity and freely, I shall have my reward from God; and the more abundant the charity, the greater the reward.  S. Aug. de Op. Mor. i. 5.
  • Ver. 17. But if against my will. That is, if I do not do it with alacrity and zeal, but instigated by the sole motive of punishment, woe unto me, as he says in the preceding verse, if I am instigated by this motive alone; still the dispensation of the gospel is entrusted to me, and I must comply with that obligation, either with the zeal and alacrity of a son, of for fear of punishment, as a slave.  Estius.
  • Ver. 19. Free as to all. That is, whereas I was under no obligation to any man, yet I made myself the servant of all, &c.  Calmet.
  • Ver. 23. How convincing it this and many similar texts against those who deny the merit of good works, and who would not have men to act with a view to any recompense, though rewards and recompenses are very frequently mentioned in holy writ.  A.
  • Ver. 24. Know you not? Nothing is more famous in the annals of history than the public games in Greece: it is to these the apostle is here alluding.  Calmet. All run indeed, &c.  He brings the examples of runners and wrestlers for a prize in the Grecian games, where only one could gain the prize.  It is true in our case many obtain the crown for which we strive, but every one is in danger of losing it, and so must use all  his endeavours to obtain it. Wi.
  • Ver. 25. He refraineth himself, &c.  Curbs his inclinations, abstains from debauchery, and any thing that may weaken him, or hinder him from gaining this corruptible crown, how much more ought we to practise self-denials for an eternal crown?  In the fifth verse, where we translate, a woman, a sister, or a sister, a woman: the Prot. translation has a sister, a wife. We have reason to reject this translation, since it is evident by this epistle, that S. Paul at least then had not a wife, c. vii. v. 7. 8.  And the ancient interpreters expressly examined and rejected this translation.  See S. Jerom against Jovian. l. i. tom. 4. part 2. p. 167. edit. Ben. S. Aug. l. de opere Monach. tom. vi. c. 4. p. 478. Nov. edit.  The Greek word, as every one knows, signifies either a woman or a wife.  Nor doth any thing here determine it to signify a wife.  He speaks of a woman, or of women that were sisters, that is, Christians; so that a sister expounds what kind of woman it was.  Dr. Hammond puts in the margin a sister-woman, as it were to correct the Prot. translation.  Wi.
  • Ver. 27. I chastise, &c.  Here S. Paul shews the necessity of self-denial and mortifications to subdue the flesh, and its inordinate desires.  Ch. Not even the labours of an apostle are exemptions from voluntary mortifications and penance.

Haydock Commentary Luke 6:39-42

  • Sorry. Nothing here.

Catena Aurea Luke 6:39-42
From Catechetics Online

  • CYRIL; The Lord added to what had gone before a very necessary parable, as it is said, And he spoke a parable to them, for His disciples were the future teachers of the world, and it therefore became them to know the way of a virtuous life, having their minds illuminated as it were by a divine brightness, that they should not be blind leaders of the blind. And then he adds, Can the blind lead the blind? But if any should chance to attain to an equal degree of virtue with their teachers, let them stand in the measure of their teachers, and follow their footsteps.
    • Hence it follows, The disciple is not above his master. Hence also Paul says, Be you also followers of me, as I am of Christ. Since Christ therefore judged not, why judge you? for He came not to judge the world, but to show mercy.
  • THEOPHYL. Or else, If you judge another, and in the very same way sin yourself, are not you like to the blind leading the blind? For how can you lead him to good when you also yourself commit sin? For the disciple is not above his master. If therefore you sin, who think yourself a master and guide, where will he be who is taught and led by you? For he will be the perfect disciple who is as his master.
  • THEOPHYL; Or the sense of this sentence depends upon the former, in which we are enjoined to give alms, and forgive injuries. If, says He, anger has blinded you against the violent, and avarice against the grasping, how can you with your corrupt heart cure his corruption? If even your Master Christ, who as God might revenge His injuries, chose rather by patience to render His persecutors more merciful, it is surely binding on His disciples, who are but men, to follow the same rule of perfection.
  • AUG. Or, He has added the words, Can the blind, lead the blind, in order that they , might not expect to receive from the Levites that measure of which He says, They shall give into your bosom, because they gave tithes to them. And these He calls blind, because they received not the Gospel, that the people might the rather now begin to hope for that reward through the disciples of the Lord, whom wishing to point out as His imitators, He added, The disciple is not above his master.
  • THEOPHYL. But the Lord introduces another parable taken from the same figure, as follows, but why see you the mote (that is, the slight fault) which is in your brother’s eye, but the beam which is in your own eye (that is, your great sin) you regard not?
  • THEOPHYL; Now this has reference to the previous parable, in which He forewarned them that the blind cannot be led by the blind, that is, the sinner corrected by the sinner. Hence it is said, Or, how can you say to your brother, Brother let me cast out the mote that is in your eye, if you see not the beam that is in your own eye?
  • CYRIL; As if He said, How can he who is guilty of grievous sins, (which He calls the beam,) condemn him who has sinned only slightly, or even in some cases not at all? For this the mote signifies.
  • THEOPHYL. But these words are applicable to all, and especially to teachers, who while they punish the least sins of those who are put under them, leave their own unpunished. Wherefore the Lord calls them hypocrites, because to this end judge they the sins of others, that they themselves might seem just. Hence it follows, You hypocrite, first cast the beam out of your own eye, &c.
  • CYRIL; That is to say, first show yourself clean from great sins, and then afterwards shall you give counsel to your neighbor, who is guilty only of slight sins.
  • BASIL; In truth, self knowledge seems the most important of all. For not only the eye, looking at outward things, fails to exercise its sight upon itself, but our understanding also, though very quick in apprehending the sin of another, is slow to perceive its own defects.

Sunday Scripture Readings September 5 2010 23rd Sunday In Ordinary Time

September 5 2010 Twenty Third Sunday in Ordinary Time
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Wisdom 9:13-18b
Douay Rheims Challoner

For who among men is he that can know the counsel of God? or who can think what the will of God is? For the thoughts of mortal men are fearful, and our counsels uncertain. For the corruptible body is a load upon the soul, and the earthly habitation presseth down the mind that museth upon many things. And hardly do we guess aright at things that are upon earth: and with labour do we find the things that are before us. But the things that are in heaven, who shall search out? And who shall know thy thought, except thou give wisdom, and send thy Holy Spirit from above: And so the ways of them that are upon earth may be corrected, and men may learn the things that please thee?

Responsorial Psalm 89:3-6, 12-17 (Ps 90 NAB)
DR Challoner Text Only

Turn not man away to be brought low:
and thou hast said: Be converted, O ye sons of men.
For a thousand years in thy sight are as yesterday, which is past.
And as a watch in the night, Things that are counted nothing, shall their years be.
In the morning man shall grow up like grass;
in the morning he shall flourish and pass away:
in the evening he shall fall, grow dry, and wither.
Can number thy wrath? So make thy right hand known:
and men learned in heart, in wisdom.
Return, O Lord, how long? and be entreated in favour of thy servants.
We are filled in the morning with thy mercy:
and we have rejoiced, and are delighted all our days.
We have rejoiced for the days in which thou hast humbled us:
for the years in which we have seen evils.
Look upon thy servants and upon their works: and direct their children.
And let the brightness of the Lord our God be upon us:
and direct thou the works of our hands over us;
yea, the work of our hands do thou direct.

Philemon 9-17
Haydock NT

For charity sake I rather beseech, thou being such a one, as Paul an old man, and now also a prisoner of Jesus Christ: I beseech thee for my son, Onesimus, whom I have begotten in my chains, Who heretofore was unprofitable to thee, but now profitable both to me and to thee. Whom I have sent back to thee. And do thou receive him as my own bowels: Whom I would have retained with me, that for thee he might have ministered to me in the bands of the gospel: But without thy counsel I would do nothing, that thy good deed might not be as it were of necessity, but voluntary. For perhaps he, therefore, departed for a season from thee, that thou mightest receive him for ever: Not now as a servant, but instead of a servant, a most dear brother, especially to me: but how much more to thee, both in the flesh, and in the Lord? If, therefore, thou count me a partner, receive him as myself

The Holy Gospel of Jesus Christ According to Saint Luke 14:25-33
Haydock NT

And there went great multitudes with him: and turning, he said to them:

If any man come to me, and hate not his father and mother, and wife, and children, and brethren, and sisters, yea, and his own life also, he cannot be my disciple. And whosoever doth not carry his cross, and come after me, cannot be my disciple. For which of you, having a mind to build a tower, doth not first sit down and reckon the charges that are necessary, whether he have wherewithal to finish it? Lest after he hath laid the foundation, and is not able to finish it, all that see it begin to mock him, Saying: ‘This man began to build, and was not able to finish.’

Or what king about to go to make war against another king, doth not first sit down and think, whether he be able with ten thousand to meet him that with twenty thousand cometh against him? Or else whilst the other is yet afar off, sending an embassy, he desireth conditions of peace. So likewise every one of you that doth not renounce all that he possesseth, cannot be my disciple.

Haydock Commentary Wisdom 9:13-18

  • Ver. 17. Thought. How shall we govern as we ought, and act as thy vicegerents, without thy Spirit? Prov. xvi. 10. and 2 K. xiv. 17.

Haydock Commentary Philemon 9-17

  • Ver. 9. I rather beseech thee, thou being such a one, as Paul. That is, united to him in spirit, by the same faith and charity; I am therefore confident thou wilt not refuse the request of Paul, now an aged man, and a prisoner, for the sake of Jesus Christ. Wi.
  • Ver. 10. I beseech thee, &c. &c. He at length tells Philemon what his request is, and names the person Onesimus, but in such terms as shew how much S. Paul has this affair at heart, and that he will look upon the favour he asks as done to himself. It is, that thou wilt pardon Onesimus, whom I look upon and love as my son, and a most dear son, whom I have begotten, a prisoner, and in my chains. Wi.—How great is the ingenuity shewn by S. Paul in this epistle, in obtaining for Onesimus the pardon of his master, Philemon. Having in the preceding verse endeavoured by every argument which a real tenderness and compassion could inspire, and making use of every expression that could conciliate the favour of Philemon, to obtain his charitable request, he in this verse for the first time dares mention Onesimus by name; a name which he was sensible must sound harsh in the ears of one who had received an injury from him. See how he endeavours to prevent so unhappy an effect, by adding to the name every epithet that could any way tend to soften all feelings of asperity, and excite compassion and pity. I beseech thee then for my son, whom I have begotten, and that in my chains. Calmet.—The pardon I crave is not for your slave, but for my son. If in all antiquity there be any thing in the persuasive kind of eloquence truly admirable, it is this short epistle in which there are contained almost as many arguments as words.
  • Ver. 11. Who heretofore was unprofitable to thee, in taking and spending what belonged to thee, yet now, after a sincere conversion, is profitable both to me and thee; to me, by the services he has done me in prison; and the joy I have had by his conversion; and also to thee, because I know thou wouldst have been glad to have rendered me all possible services thyself, and he has done them for thee; he hath supplied thy place. For these reasons I could have wished to have detained him with me: but I have sent him back, thou being his master, nor would I do any thing in regard of thy servant, without they advice and consent, that if thou thinkest it fitting to send him back again to me, and to give him his freedom, it may be without any constraint upon thee, without any necessity, thy voluntary and charitable act and deed. Wi.—S. Paul here makes an allusion to the word Onesimus, signifying useful in the Greek. He was before unprofitable, he says, to thee, contrary to the import of his name; but now he is truly an Onesimus, or useful, both to you and to me; to you indeed, by his conversion, and the resolution he now makes to serve you faithfully the remainder of his life; to me also, by the services he renders me in my chains. Calmet.—S. Jerome observes that some hypercritics pretended that this subject was not deserving the solicitude of an apostle, and on that account questioned its author; but this reasoning is unworthy of those who adore a God who did not refuse to die for rebellious and impious slaves. It shews pastors how solicitous they should always be for the salvation of the meanest of their flock; yes, though they may appear obdurate, and dead and buried in the pit of sin.
  • Ver. 12-15. Do thou receive him as my own bowels. That is, as myself. Perhaps by the permission of God’s providence (who never permits evil, but for some greater good) he departed from thee for a little while, that thou mightest receive him for ever, being now after his conversion in a way of being made partaker with thee of the same eternal happiness. Wi.
  • Ver. 16. Receive him not now as a servant, but also as a most dear brother, especially to me. Nay I may say, how much more dear even to thee, both in the flesh, having been a Gentile as thou thyself wast, and having been also a servant in thy family. And secondly, he ought now to be dear to thee in our Lord, he who was thy servant, being now united to thee by the same faith, and by an union of charity. See Estius. Wi.
  • Ver. 17. If, therefore, thou count me a partner, as a brother in Christ, as a member of Christ with thee, receive him as myself. Wi.

Haydock Commentary Luke 14:25-33

  • Ver. 26. Hate not, &c. The law of Christ does not allow us to hate even our enemies, much less our parents: but the meaning of the text is, that we must be in that disposition of soul so as to be willing to renounce and part with everything, how near or dear soever it may be to us, that would keep us from following Christ. Ch.—The word hate is not to be taken in its proper sense, but to be expounded by the words of Christ, (Matt. x. 37.) that no man must love his father more than God, &c. Wi.—Christ wishes to shew us what dispositions are necessary in him who desires to become his disciple; (Theophy.) and to teach us that we must not be discouraged, if we meet with many hardships and labours in our journey to our heavenly country. S. Greg.—And if for our sakes, Christ even renounced his own mother, saying, Who is my mother, and who are my brethren? Why do you wish to be treated more delicately than your Lord? S. Ambrose.—He wished also to demonstrate to us, that the hatred he here inculcates, is not to proceed from any disaffection towards our parents, but from charity for ourselves; for immediately he adds, and his own life also. From which words it is evident, that in our love we must hate our brethren as we do ourselves.
  • Ver. 28. For which of you, &c. The similitude, which our divined Saviour makes use of, represents the offices and duty of a true Christian, for he has to build within himself and conduct others by his example to war with the devil, the world, and the flesh; and he has to season, purify, and keep all his actions free from corruption by the spiritual salt of mortification and prayer. Tirinus.
  • Ver. 29. Lest after, &c. Here he wishes to shew us, that we are not to embrace any state of life, particularly that of an ecclesiastic, without previous and serious consideration, whether we shall be able to go through with the difficulties and dangers which will inevitably befall us: lest afterwards we find ourselves constrained to yield to our enemies, who will deride us, and say: This man began to build, and was not able to finish. Tirinus.

Sunday Scripture Readings August 15 2010 Solemnity of the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary

August 15 2010 Solemnity of the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary – Vigil
Disclaimer – Official Readings of the Liturgy at – http://www.usccb.org/nab/

Revelation 11:19a; 12:1-6a, 10ab (Apocalypse)
Haydock New Testament

The_Assumption_of_the_Virgin Francesco_BotticiniAnd the temple of God was opened in heaven: And the ark of his testament was seen in his temple, and there were lightnings, and voices, and an earthquake, and great hail. And there appeared a great wonder in heaven: a woman clothed with the sun, and the moon under her feet, and on her head a crown of twelve stars: and being with child, she cried travailing in birth, and was in pain to be delivered.

And there appeared another wonder in heaven: and behold, a great red dragon, having seven heads and ten horns, and on his head seven diadems, and his tail drew the third part of the stars of heaven, and cast them to the earth: and the dragon stood before the woman, who was ready to be delivered, that, when she should be delivered, he might devour her son.

And she brought forth a man child, who was to rule all nations with an iron rod: and her son was taken up to God, and to his throne: and the woman fled into the wilderness, where she had a place prepared by God.

And I heard a loud voice in heaven, saying: Now is come salvation, and strength, and the kingdom of our God, and the power of his Christ.

Responsorial Psalm 44:10-12, 16 (Ps 45 NAB)
DR Challoner Text Only

The daughters of kings have delighted thee in thy glory.
The queen stood on thy right hand,
in gilded clothing; surrounded with variety.
Hearken, O daughter, and see, and incline thy ear:
and forget thy people and thy father’s house.
And the king shall greatly desire thy beauty;
for he is the Lord thy God, and him they shall adore.
They shall be brought with gladness and rejoicing:
they shall be brought into the temple of the king.

1 Corinthians 15:20-27
Haydock NT

But now Christ is risen from the dead, the first-fruits of them that sleep. For by a man came death, and by a man the resurrection of the dead. And as in Adam all die, so also in Christ all shall be made alive.

But every one in his own order: the first-fruits, Christ; then they that are of Christ, who have believed in his coming: Afterwards the end, when he shall have delivered up the kingdom to God and the Father, when he shall have abolished all principality, and authority, and power. For he must reign, until he hath put all enemies under his feet.

And the enemy, death, shall be destroyed last: For he hath put all things under his feet. And whereas he saith, All things are put under him; undoubtedly, he is excepted, who put all things under him.

The Holy Gospel of Jesus Christ According to Saint Luke 1:39-56
Haydock New Testament

And Mary rising up in those days, went into the mountainous country with haste, into a city of Juda: And she entered into the house of Zachary, and saluted Elizabeth. And it came to pass, that when Elizabeth heard the salutation of Mary, the infant leaped in her womb: and Elizabeth was filled with the Holy Ghost: And she cried out with a loud voice, and said:

Bless art thou among women, and blessed is the fruit of thy womb. And when is this to me, that the mother of my Lord should come to me? For behold as soon as the voice of thy salutation sounded in my ears, the infant in my womb leaped for joy. And blessed art thou that hast believed, because those things shall be accomplished that were spoken to the by the Lord.

Sandro_Botticelli_MadonnaoftheMagnificatAnd Mary said:

My soul doth magnify the Lord:
And my spirit hath rejoiced in God, my Saviour.
Because he hath regarded the humility of his handmaid:
For behold, from henceforth all generations will call me blessed.
For he that is mighty hath done great things to me:
And Holy is his name.
And his mercy is from generation to generations, To them that fear him.
He hath shewed might in his arm:
He hath scattered the proud in the conceit of their heart.
He hath put down the mighty from their seat,
And hath exalted the humble.
He hath filled the hungry with good things:
And the rich he hath sent away empty.
He hath received Israel, his servant,
Being mindful of his mercy.
As he spoke to our fathers,
To Abraham, and to his seed, for ever.

And Mary abode with her about three months: and she returned to her own house.

Haydock Commentary Apocalypse 11:19; 12:1-6a, 10ab
Notes Copied From Haydock Commentary Site

  • Ver. 19. The temple of God was opened . . . the ark of his testament was seen; which P. Alleman applies to the cross that appeared in the air to Constantine. Such applications may be probable, but cannot be called certain. Wi. – Many have applied this to the appearance of the Blessed Virgin into heaven as the Ark of the New Covenant, hence our celebration of this passage on the Solemnity of the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary into heaven. –Bob. For more on that I recommend Scott Hahn’s book – Hail Holy Queen, in which Dr Hahn provides excellent insight into this entire passage.
  • CHAPTER XII.
  • Ver. 1. A woman clothed with the sun, and the moon under her feet. By this woman, interpreters commonly understand the Church of Christ, shining with the light of faith, under the protection of the sun of justice, Jesus Christ. The moon, the Church, hath all changeable things of this world under her feet, the affections of the faithful being raised above them all. A woman: the Church of God. It may also, by allusion, be applied to our blessed Lady. The Church is clothed with the sun, that is, with Christ: she hath the moon, that is, the changeable things of the world, under her feet; and the twelve stars with which she is crowned, are the twelve apostles: she is in labour and pain, whilst she brings forth her children, and Christ in them, in the midst of afflictions and persecutions. Ch. Under the figure of a woman and of a dragon, are represented the various attempts of Satan to undermine the Church. On her head . . . twelve stars, her doctrine being delivered by the twelve apostles and their successors. Wi.
  • Ver. 2. With child, &c., to signify that the Church, even in the time of persecutions, brought forth children to Christ. Wi. It likewise signifies the difficulties which obstructed the first propagation of Christianity. Past.
  • Ver. 3. Another wonder in heaven; that is, in the Church of Christ, though revealed to S. John, in the visions, as if they were seen in heaven. A great red dragon; a fiery dragon, with seven heads and ten horns; i.e. many heads and many horns. By the dragon is generally understood the devil, (see v. 7 and 9) and by the heads and horns, kings and princes, who act under him, persecuting the servants of God. Wi. Dragon, &c. the devil; and by the seven heads and ten horns, are meant those princes and governors who persecute the Church of Christ. Calmet.
  • Ver. 4. His tail drew the third part of the stars: a great part of mankind. This is spoken with an allusion to the fall of Lucifer from heaven, with the rebellious angels, driven from thence by S. Michael. Wi. According to Pastorini, the passage refers to the angels whom Lucifer drew after him by sin to the earth. Menochius interprets it of those bishops and eminent persons who fell under the weight of persecution, and apostatized. And the dragon stood before the woman, &c. The devil is always ready, as far as God permits him, to make war against the Church and the faithful servants of God. The woman, the Church, brought a man child, or rather many men children, stout and valiant in the profession of the true faith, able to resist and triumph over the attempts of the persecutors in all nations, not of themselves, but by the grace and power of Jesus Christ, their protector, whi is able to rule all nations as it were with a rod of iron, to frustrate all their attempts, and turn their hearts as he pleaseth. Wi.
  • Ver. 5. A man child; that is, a masculine race of Christians, willing to confess the name of the Lord, and to fight his battles; who, through the merits of Jesus Christ, should triumph over all the attempts of the world. Calmet. Her son (or children) was taken up to heaven, guarded by the special favour of God. They always overcome the devil, and all their adversaries, by reason of the blood of the Lamb, by the merits of Christ. And they loved not the life of the body, so as to preserve it, by incurring the death of the soul. Wi.
  • Ver. 6. The woman fled into the wilderness. The Church, in the times of persecutions, must be content to serve God in a private manner; but by the divine Providence, such persecutions never lasted with violence only for a short time, signified by 1260 days, or as the same is expressed here, (v. 14) for a time, and times, and half a time, i.e. for a year, and two years, and half a year. Wi. The Christians were accustomed to fly during the times of persecution into the deserts, to avoid the fury of the pagans. This was done by the greatest saints; and S. Jerom remarks, that it was this which gave rise to the eremitical state of life.

Haydock Commentary 1 Corinthians 15:20-27

  • Ver. 13-23. Note from Bob – These notes are for a larger chunk of text not included in the readings, but the quality of the notes is adequate that they need not rely entirely on the text of St Paul’s Epistle. He brings many reasons to convince them of the resurrection. 1. If there be no resurrection for others, Christ is not risen again: but his resurrection (as he tells them ver. 4) was foretold in the Scriptures. 2. And if Christ be not risen again, . . your faith is also in vain, this being one of the chief articles of your belief. 3. We should be found guilty of lies and impostures; and yet we have confirmed this doctrine by many miracles. 4. It would follow that you are not freed from your sins; i.e. unless Christ, by his resurrection, has triumphed over sin and death. 5. Without a resurrection we Christians, who live under self-denials and persecutions, would be the most miserable of all men, neither happy in this world nor in the next, for the happiness of the soul requires also a happy resurrection of the body. 6. Christ is the first-fruits, and the first begotten of the dead, of those who have slept: and by his being the first-fruits, it must be supposed that others also will rise after him. 7. As death came by the first man, (Adam) so the second man (Christ) came to repair the death of men, both as to body and soul; and without Christ’s resurrection, both the souls of men have remained dead in their original sins, and their bodies shall not rise again. Wi.
  • Ver. 24. &c. Afterwards the end; i.e. after the general resurrection of all, will be the end of the world. Then Christ shall deliver up his kingdom, as to this world, over all men, over the devil and his apostate angels, signified by principalities and powers; not but that Christ, both as God and man, shall reign for all eternity, not only over his elect but over all creatures, having triumphed by his resurrection over the enemy of mankind, the devil, over sin, and over death, which is as it were the last enemy of his elect. At the general resurrection, Christ will present these elect to his heavenly Father, as the fruits of his victory over sin and death; and though as man he came to suffer and die, and was also made subject to his eternal Father, yet being God as well as man, he is Lord of all, and will make his faithful servants partakers of his glory in his heavenly kingdom. Wi.

Haydock Commentary Luke 1:39-56

  • Ver. 36. We find that Aaron, who was of the tribe of Levi, took a wife of the tribe of Juda, viz. Elizabeth, the sister of Naasson. In the successors of David we find that Joiada, the chief priest, took a wife of the family of David, viz. the daughter of Joram; from which it appears that both the royal and sacerdotal tribes were united, and that Mary and Elizabeth were relatives. It was certainly proper that Christ should be born of both these tribes, because he was in himself both king and priest. Ven. Bede.
  • Ver. 38. Behold the handmaid. With all modesty and humility of heart and mind, the blessed Virgin consented to the divine will: and from that moment in her was conceived the Saviour and Redeemer of the world. Wi. Thus ought the virgin, who brought forth meekness and humility itself, to shew forth an example of the most profound humility. S. Amb.
  • Ver. 39. This city is generally supposed to be Hebron, a sacerdotal town, (Jos. xxi. 11.) situated in the mountains, to the south of Juda, and about 120 miles from Nazareth. V.
  • Ver. 41. The infant leaped in her womb.[7] According to the general opinion of the interpreters, this motion of the child at the time was not natural: and some think that God gave to S. John, even in his mother’s womb, a passing knowledge of the presence of his Redeemer. See S. Aug. in the above cited letter to Dardanus. Wi.
  • Ver. 42. In the same words she is pronounced blessed by Elizabeth, and by the angel Gabriel, both inspired by the Holy Ghost, and this not only to the praise of Jesus, but for his sake, to the praise of Mary, calling her blessed, and her fruit blessed; and thus, as Ven. Bede asserts, holding her up to the veneration of both men and angels.
  • Ver. 43. The mother of my Lord. A proof that Christ was truly God, and the blessed Virgin Mary truly the mother of God. Wi. Elizabeth was a just and blessed woman; yet the excellency of the mother of God does so far surpass that of Elizabeth, and of every other woman, as the great luminary outshines the smaller stars. S. Jerom præf. in Sophon.
  • Ver. 47. In God my Saviour, as appears by the Greek text,[8] though literally in Latin, in God my salvation. Wi.
  • Ver. 48. The humility of his handmaid,[9] i.e. the humble, low, and abject condition; as perhaps might be translated both in this and in v. 52. For the blessed Virgin does not here commend and praise her own virtue of humility; as divers interpreters observe. See S. Francis de Sales, in his introduction to a devout life, part 3, c. vi. Wi. As death entered into the world by the pride of our first parents, so was it proper that the path to life should be opened by the humility of Mary. Ven. Bede. Not Elizabeth only, but all nations of believers are to call her blessed. Theophy.
  • Ver. 51. The wise men of the Gentiles, the Pharisees and Scribes, were powerful; but these the Almighty cast down, and exalted those, who humbled themselves under his powerful hand. 1 Peter v. The Jews were proud in their strength, but their incredulity brought on them their humiliation; whilst the low and mean among the Gentiles, have by faith ascended to the summit of perfection. S. Cyril Alex. in S. Thom. catenâ aureâ. Wi.
  • Ver. 53. The Jews were rich in the possession of the law, and the doctrines of the prophets; but, as they would not humbly unite themselves to the incarnate word, they were sent away empty, without faith, without knowledge, deprived of all hopes of temporal goods, excluded from the terrestrial Jerusalem, and also from that which is in heaven. But the Gentiles, oppressed with hunger and thirst, by adhering to their Lord, were filled with all spiritual gifts. S. Basil in Ps. xxxiii.