Sunday Scripture Readings October 3 2010 27th Sunday in Ordinary Time

October 3 2010 Twenty Seventh Sunday in Ordinary Time
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Habakukk 1:2-3; 2:2-4
Douay-Rheims Challoner

How long, O Lord, shall I cry, and thou wilt not hear? shall I cry out to thee suffering violence, and thou wilt not save? Why hast thou shewn me iniquity and grievance, to see rapine and injustice before me? and there is a judgment, but opposition is more powerful.

And the Lord answered me, and said:

Write the vision, and make it plain upon tables: that he that readeth it may run over it. For as yet the vision is far off, and it shall appear at the end, and shall not lie: if it make any delay, wait for it: for it shall surely come, and it shall not be slack. Behold, he that is unbelieving, his soul shall not be right in himself: but the just shall live in his faith.

Responsorial Psalm 94:1-2, 6-9 (Ps 95 NAB)
DR Challoner Text Only

Come let us praise the Lord with joy:
let us joyfully sing to God our saviour.
Let us come before his presence with thanksgiving;
and make a joyful noise to him with psalms.
Come let us adore and fall down:
and weep before the Lord that made us.
For he is the Lord our God:
and we are the people of his pasture and the sheep of his hand.
To day if you shall hear his voice, harden not your hearts:
As in the provocation, according to the day of temptation in the wilderness:
where your fathers tempted me, they proved me, and saw my works.

2 Timothy 1:6-8, 13-14
Haydock NT

For which cause I admonish thee, that thou stir up the grace of God, which is in thee, by the imposition of my hands. For God hath not given us the spirit of fear: but of power, and of love, and of sobriety. Be not thou, therefore, ashamed of the testimony of our Lord, nor of me, his prisoner: but labour with the gospel, according to the power of God:

Hold the form of sound words, which thou hast heard of me in faith, and in the love which is in Christ Jesus. Keep the good deposit by the Holy Ghost, who dwelleth in us.

The Holy Gospel of Jesus Christ According to Saint Luke 17:5-10
Haydock New Testament

And the apostles said to the Lord;

Increase our faith.

And the Lord said;

If you had faith like to a grain of mustard-seed, you might say to this mulberry-tree; Be thou rooted up, and be transplanted into the sea, and it shall obey you.

But which of you having a servant ploughing or feeding cattle, will say to him when he is come from the field: Immediately go, sit down to table: And will not rather say to him: Make ready my supper, and gird thyself, and serve me whilst I eat and drink, and afterwards thou shalt eat and drink?

Doth he thank that servant, because he did the things which he commanded him? I think not.  So you also, when you shall have done all the things that are commanded you, say: We are unprofitable servants: we have done that which we ought to do.

Haydock Commentary Habakukk 1:2-3; 2:2-4
Notes Copied From Haydock Commentary Site

  • Ver.  2. Save. Some think that he expresses the sentiments of the weak, like David, (Ps. lxxii. 2.) or what he had formerly entertained.  The language of the prophets is very bold.  Ex. xxxii. 32.  Job iii. 3.  Jer. xx. 14.  Jon. iv. 8.  C.
  • Ver.  3. Opposition. Sept. “the judge receives” bribes.  H. — Such was the state of Juda after Josias.  Jer. xxi. 12.
  • HABACUC 2
  • CHAPTER II.
  • Ver. 2. Over it. It shall be so legible (H.) anyone may hear or take a copy.  C.
  • Ver.  3. Slack. That which happens at the time fixed is not.  W. — Heb. “the vision is for an appointed time.”  Habacuc might live to see the conquest and downfall of Nabuchodonosor.  Many think that the first and second coming of Christ (Heb. x. 36.  Rom. i. 17.) are here insinuated, as the dominion of the aforesaid king represented the slavery of mankind under the devil, and the liberty granted by Cyrus was a type of their redemption.  The felicity of the Jews is the last event which the prophet specifies, and this is here the literal sense.  S. Cyr.  C.
  • Ver. 4. Unbelieving. Prot. “lifted up.”  H. — The king’s vain projects shall fail.  Sept. Rom. “If he withdraw himself, my soul shall not have pleasure in him.  But my just man shall live by my faith.”  Others read with S. Paul, “my just man shall live by faith.”  Heb. x. 38.  C. — The source of content arises from faith, (without which this life would be a sort of death, as the apostle and S. Aug. Trin. xiv. 12. &c. observe) because it is the beginning of life by grace, which the works of the law could not otherwise confer.  Gal. iii.  W. — The Heb. will admit the sense of the Sept. and we ought rather to shew this in passages which the authors of the New Testament quote, than to excuse them.  Here their version seems preferable to that given by moderns, ecce elata est, non recta anima ejus in eo, the drift of which who can guess?  Beza has acted unfairly, “at si quis se subduxerit non est gratum animo meo;” whereas the text speaks of the “just man,” as Theophylactus observes.  “Hence all who know his theological opinions, may see how suspicious his translation must be accounted.”  Pearson. pref. Sept.  H.

Haydock Commentary 2 Timothy 1:6-8, 13-14

  • Ver. 6. That thou stir up[2] the grace of God. In the Greek is a metaphor for fire that is blown up again. — Which is in thee by the imposition of my hands, when thou wast ordained bishop.  Wi. — The grace, which S. Paul here exhorts Timothy to stir up in him, was the grace he had received by imposition of hands, either in his confirmation, or at receiving the sacrament of orders, being a bishop.  This verse seems to shew that the imposition of hands is used in these two sacraments, as the essential matter of the sacraments, being the instrumental cause of the grace therein conferred.  Dion. Carthus.
  • Ver. 7. Of fear.[3]  Of a cowardly fear, and want of courage. — Of sobriety.[4]  Though the Protestants here translate of a sound mind, yet they translate the same Greek word by sobriety in divers other places, as Acts xxvi. 25.  1 Tim. ii. 9 and 15. and c. iii. 2. Tit. i. 8. &c.  Wi.
  • Ver. 8. Labour with[5] the gospel. That is, labour with me in preaching, &c.  Or by the Greek, be partner with me in suffering.  Wi.
  • Ver. 14. Keep the good (doctrine) deposited or committed[7] in trust to thee. This is different, though the word be the same, from what he spoke of, v. 12.  There he mentioned what he had committed and deposited in the hands of God; here he speaks of what God hath committed, and deposited in the hands of Timothy, after it was delivered to him by S. Paul and the other preachers of the gospel: that is, he speaks of the care Timothy must take to preserve the same sound doctrine, and to teach it to others.  See 1 Tim. vi. 20.  Wi.

Haydock Commentary Luke 17:5-10

  • Ver. 5. Increase our faith. The disciples having heard our Saviour inculcating maxims hard to flesh and blood, such as avoiding scandal, and forgiving our enemies, humbly beg their faith may be increased, that they may be able to comply with these maxims; for they had heard Christ say, that every thing was possible to him that believed.  Theophy. — Christ compares faith to a grain of mustard seed; because, though the grain be small, it is nevertheless stronger than most herbs.  S. Chrysos.
  • Ver. 6. To this mulberry-tree. In S. Matthew, (xvii. 19.) we read, to this mountain. Christ might say both at different times.  Wi.
  • Ver. 7. The design and end of this parable is to shew that, rigorously speaking, we are useless servants with regard to God.  This sovereign Master has a right to exact of us every kind of service, and to make us apply ourselves to any task he may think proper, without our having any reason to complain either of the difficulty, trouble, or length of our labours; we are entirely his, and he is master of our persons, time, and talents.  We hold of him whatever we possess, and wo to us if we abuse his trust, by applying our talents to any use contrary to his designs.  But though he be Lord and Master, he leaves our liberty entire.  If he produces in us holy desires, if he works in us meritorious actions, gives us virtuous inclinations and supernatural gifts, he sets to our account the good use we make of them; and in crowning our merits, he crowns his own gifts.  S. Aug. lib. ix. Confes. and Serm. 131.  Calmet.
  • Ver. 10. Unprofitable servants. Because our service is of no profit to our Master; and he justly claims it as our bounden duty.  But though we are unprofitable to him, our serving him is not unprofitable to us; for he is pleased to give, by his grace, a value to our good works, which, in consequence of his promise, entitles them to an eternal reward.  Ch. — The word useless, when joined to servant, generally means a servant from whom his master does not derive the service he has a right to expect; as in S. Matt. xxv. 30.  Here the word is taken in a less odious sense.  It means a servant who does not testify sufficient zeal and ardour in his master’s service, who is not very eager to please him.  With regard to God, we are always useless servants, because he wants not our services; and without his assistance, we can neither undertake nor finish any thing to please him.  Calmet.
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